Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Librem/Purism Anti-interdiction Services

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

I often refer to Purism as a company that sits on a three-legged stool of freedom, privacy and security. I’ve even written posts in the past about how those concepts all fit together. While Purism focuses on all of these categories at the same time, we have an incredibly diverse customer base from many different walks of life and often our customers care more about one of the categories than the others. This means that sometimes we offer features or advancements that appeal only to a segment of our overall customer base.

For instance, customers who prioritize freedom might buy a Librem laptop because of the FSF endorsement of PureOS, the coreboot firmware, or our careful selection of hardware that can run on free software drivers. Customers who prioritize privacy might buy a Librem laptop because of the hardware kill switches or our commitment to privacy in our Social Purpose Corporation charter. Customers who prioritize security might pick us for our hardware kill switches, the fact we disable and neutralize the Management Engine by default, because of our PureBoot tamper-evident firmware, how we protect our supply chain, or because of how well our hardware runs QubesOS.

In this post I’m going to elaborate on a service we’ve offered for quite some time, but haven’t publicized much, that will be of particular interest to security-focused customers–our anti-interdiction service. This is a custom add-on service we have provided in the past to high-risk customers who are especially concerned about detecting any tampering with their hardware during shipment. Up until now you had to request this service explicitly to get details but starting today we are listing it as an additional upgrade you can add to any laptop order.

Read more

Librem 5 September 2019 Software Update

  • Librem 5 September 2019 Software Update

    Here’s what happened to the Librem 5 software in September. This doesn’t cover every single improvement or fix that was made, just a selection of them. You can follow the development of the software in our GitLab instance.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Try GNOME 3.38 Orbis

Congratulations to GNOME developers! We can already try version 3.38 "Orbis" right here right now. Simply grab Fedora or openSUSE at the latest development version as you can find Orbis in them. I share with you my experience in trying out Orbis below. Along with this short review I also include the links, video, and a lot of screenshots like usual. Enjoy! Read more

Making Arch GNU/Linux 2020 Works with GLIM Multiboot USB

Continuing my business shipping computer installation media in Indonesia, recently I shipped Arch 2020 to South Sumatra the southern province in Sumatra Island along with other GNU/Linux operating systems. Apparently, nowadays Arch is a little bit different to earlier versions back in 2019 in which the ISO file contents changed by merely a character. Default GLIM configuration won't work anymore. Thus we need a change in the configurations so new Arch will work with GLIM once again. This tutorial brings you my custom change so Arch boots in multiboot way straight from the flash drive. Read more

Programming and Hardware Hacking

  • Raspberry Pi inspired MaaxBoard Mini SBC features NXP i.MX 8M Mini SoC

    Last year, Embest – an Avnet company – introduced MaaXBoard NXP i.MX 8M SBC mostly compatible with Raspberry Pi form factor and running Android 9.0 or Yocto Linux.

  • Code a GUI live with Digital Making at Home
  • RenderDoc 1.10 Released For This Leading Cross-Platform Graphics Debugger

    RenderDoc 1.10 was released on Friday for this leading open-source program supporting frame-capture-based debugging on Vulkan, OpenGL / GLES, and Direct3D across Windows, Linux, and Android along with platforms like Stadia and the Nintendo Switch. RenderDoc 1.10 brings various optimizations and speed improvements, which is always nice to see. RenderDoc should now have lower idle overhead, greater performance when capturing a frame on Vulkan in certain instances, faster cold startup time, improved replay time when switching events for Vulkan captures, and other optimizations.

  • Sublime Text – Best text editor for Linux [Ed: Why promote dodgy proprietary software when better editors exist that are Free/libre?]

    In this guide, you will learn how to install Sublime Text editor on Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, etc. Sublime Text is a cross-platform, light-weight code editor. It natively supports many programming and markup languages. Its functions can be extended with plugins. It has many other features, some of them listed below.

  • GCC 11 Compiler Might Finally Enable DWARF 5 Debugging By Default

    For a number of years the GNU Compiler Collection has shipped experimental support for the DWARF 5 debugging data format while finally for next year's GCC 11 release it might be deemed stable and used by default. The DWARF 5 debug data format was published back in 2017 to succeed the now decade old DWARF Version 4. With DWARF 5 there is support for better data compression, various performance improvements, better debug handling around optimized code, and other enhancements over DWARF4. DWARF 5 itself was in development for a half-decade and is detailed at DWARFstd.org.

Programming and Hardware Hacking

  • Raspberry Pi inspired MaaxBoard Mini SBC features NXP i.MX 8M Mini SoC

    Last year, Embest – an Avnet company – introduced MaaXBoard NXP i.MX 8M SBC mostly compatible with Raspberry Pi form factor and running Android 9.0 or Yocto Linux.

  • Code a GUI live with Digital Making at Home
  • RenderDoc 1.10 Released For This Leading Cross-Platform Graphics Debugger

    RenderDoc 1.10 was released on Friday for this leading open-source program supporting frame-capture-based debugging on Vulkan, OpenGL / GLES, and Direct3D across Windows, Linux, and Android along with platforms like Stadia and the Nintendo Switch. RenderDoc 1.10 brings various optimizations and speed improvements, which is always nice to see. RenderDoc should now have lower idle overhead, greater performance when capturing a frame on Vulkan in certain instances, faster cold startup time, improved replay time when switching events for Vulkan captures, and other optimizations.

  • Sublime Text – Best text editor for Linux [Ed: Why promote dodgy proprietary software when better editors exist that are Free/libre?]

    In this guide, you will learn how to install Sublime Text editor on Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, Manjaro, etc. Sublime Text is a cross-platform, light-weight code editor. It natively supports many programming and markup languages. Its functions can be extended with plugins. It has many other features, some of them listed below.

  • GCC 11 Compiler Might Finally Enable DWARF 5 Debugging By Default

    For a number of years the GNU Compiler Collection has shipped experimental support for the DWARF 5 debugging data format while finally for next year's GCC 11 release it might be deemed stable and used by default. The DWARF 5 debug data format was published back in 2017 to succeed the now decade old DWARF Version 4. With DWARF 5 there is support for better data compression, various performance improvements, better debug handling around optimized code, and other enhancements over DWARF4. DWARF 5 itself was in development for a half-decade and is detailed at DWARFstd.org.