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Running Windows applications with CrossOver Linux 6.0

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Software

CodeWeavers this month announced version 6.0 of its flagship Windows compatibility product. Now called CrossOver Linux, the new version is the first with official support for games. With its growing application support and foray into gaming, CrossOver Linux 6 is an excellent alternative for Linux users who are stuck with a Windows application at work or at school.

The changes to application support in CrossOver Linux 6 are frugal -- mostly tweaks and interface improvements to streamline performance. But a lot of work has been done to enable this version to support Steam-powered games such as World of Warcraft and Half Life 2. To give unsupported applications a better chance of working, version 6 has a new Windows XP bottle. Bottles, introduced in version 5.0, are discrete instances of the Windows compatibility layer, designed to improve stability by isolating applications.

CrossOver Linux 6 is available in two flavors: Standard ($40) and Professional ($70). Both versions support the same applications, but Professional edition has a few enterprise-centric features.

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With CrossOver Linux 6, CodeWeavers now supports running several popular Windows applications and games under Linux. In this interview Jeremy White, CEO of CodeWeavers, discusses how his company contributes to the freely available Wine project and its decision to foray into the gaming segment.

NewsForge: How do you pick which applications to support? Are there more factors at play than pledges and votes?

Jeremy White: We first look at bugs that are pending tickets; i.e., points of pain first. Next comes votes, and then come pledges. There are exceptions; sometimes a customer will pay for support. We supported Photoshop because the studios paid us to do so. We also look at things like level of difficulty, so sometimes we'll pick an easier application over a more highly desired application, but that's hard to quantify. And, of course, sometimes we look at opening up whole new opportunities, like supporting games.

NF: What kind of relation do you have with third-party software vendors? Do you actively collaborate?

A peek behind CrossOver Linux with CodeWeavers' CEO

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