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Your reviews: Vista and rivals

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OS

We have selected two readers to explain what they like and don't like about the new operating system and two readers who are extolling the virtues of rival systems - the open source platform Linux and Apple's Mac OS X.

Approximately six months ago I was given an opportunity to beta test Microsoft's latest operating system (OS) Windows Vista.

I've been using Windows since 3.1 came out, so I immediately jumped at the offer. I really wasn't expecting something altogether different from previous versions, but immediately Vista proved to be in a league of its own.

The first thing you notice when you get to the desktop is the appearance. It is visually stunning.

...

One of the advantages of Linux is its flexibility.

For the novice user it is straightforward to use, yet it also gives more experienced users radical powers over their computer which are not available in other operating systems.

Also there is a huge variety of high quality, free software available for Linux.

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The first thing I noticed after switching from Windows to Mac OS X almost six years ago is its complete lack of distractions.

It is clean, uncluttered and lets me get on with my tasks.

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Full Story.

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