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Text messages deliver woman from abductor

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Sci/Tech

Police in New York state were able to rescue a kidnapped 19-year-old Glen Burnie woman with the help of text messages she secretly sent over her cell phone while her abductor drove her to Long Island, N.Y., Maryland police said.

The woman, Kelly Lazo, was abducted by her ex-boyfriend, Jose Machuca Del Cid, 23, yesterday morning shortly after she left her house, said Sgt. Michael Calvert, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Police Department.

Her family was alerted to the kidnapping only after she started sending text messages on her cell phone after 3 p.m. It had taken Lazo several hours to figure out where she was, police said.

The family called the police, who went to the house and monitored the subsequent messages. She indicated the highway exits the car was passing, which helped the Anne Arundel police track the car to New Jersey and then to Long Island, Calvert said. "We were getting text messages in this county, and we were relaying it on the phone to the police department in New York."

With the information, Nassau County police were able to set up roadblocks on the Long Island Expressway to intercept Del Cid's beige Toyota Camry.
The car was stopped about 8:20 p.m. near Exit 39 of the expressway, and Del Cid was arrested, Nassau County police said.

Lazo was unharmed and was waiting to be picked up by her family, the police said.

Source.

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