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Firefox 70 Is Now Available to Download with Fresh New Look, Extended Dark Mode

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Moz/FF

Judging by the version number, you would think that Firefox 70 is a massive update to the open-source and cross-platform web browser built by Mozilla, but it's not really a major release. However, it does bring some a fresh new look for its icon, new welcome screen, and an extended dark mode for the built-in pages.

So the first thing you'll notice after installing Firefox 70, which you can download right now for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, it's the new Firefox icon that was unveiled by Mozilla a few months ago. In addition, you'll notice that all of Firefox's built-in pages now follows the system dark mode preference and a new welcome screen will help you setup Firefox faster.

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Firefox 70 is Here with New Logo, Secure Password Generator

  • Firefox 70 is Here with New Logo, Secure Password Generator + More

    The release, the latest stable update to the hugely popular open source web browser, features a number of notable improvements and privacy enhancements.

    Among the changes is the new Firefox logo we reported on back in June. The new Firefox logo for the browser — there’s a separate new logo for Firefox as a product family — is as striking as it is colourful, and certainly helps give the browser a more ‘modern’ presence across operating systems.

    But the “visual” changes don’t stop there.

    Users will also now see an indicator in the address bar when loading a website that accesses geolocation data.

Firefox 70 Released With JavaScript Baseline Interpreter, Other

  • Firefox 70 Released With JavaScript Baseline Interpreter, Other Updates

    Firefox 70.0 officially hit the web this morning as the newest version of Mozilla's web browser.

    Firefox 70 is notable on the JavaScript front with enabling the new Baseline Interpreter as a faster JavaScript interpreter. The baseline interpreter is exciting but there are also various security improvements, WebRender being flipped on by default for more systems (though on the Windows side), various developer tooling enhancements, privacy handling refinements, and many other web API / developer additions.

Firefox 70 and More

  • Firefox 70 — a bountiful release for all

    Firefox 70 is released today, and includes great new features such as secure password generation with Lockwise and the new Firefox Privacy Protection Report; you can read the full details in the Firefox 70 Release Notes.

    Amazing user features and protections aside, we’ve also got plenty of cool additions for developers in this release. These include DOM mutation breakpoints and inactive CSS rule indicators in the DevTools, several new CSS text properties, two-value display syntax, and JS numeric separators. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at some of the highlights!

  • Dramatically reduced power usage in Firefox 70 on macOS with Core Animation

    In Firefox 70 we changed how pixels get to the screen on macOS. This allows us to do less work per frame when only small parts of the screen change. As a result, Firefox 70 drastically reduces the power usage during browsing.In short, Firefox 70 improves power usage by 3x or more for many use cases. The larger the Firefox window and the smaller the animation, the bigger the difference. Users have reported much longer battery life, cooler machines and less fan spinning.

Firefox 70 Details

  • Latest Firefox Brings Privacy Protections Front and Center Letting You Track the Trackers

    Our push this year has been building privacy-centric features in our products that are on by default. With this move, we’re taking the guesswork out of how to give yourself more privacy online thanks to always-on features like blocking third-party tracking cookies and cryptominers also known as Enhanced Tracking Protection. Since July 2 we’ve blocked more than 450 billion tracking requests that attempt to follow you around the web.

  • Firefox 70 released

    Version 70 of the Firefox web browser is out. The headline features include a new password generator and a "privacy protection report" showing users which trackers have been blocked. "Amazing user features and protections aside, we’ve also got plenty of cool additions for developers in this release. These include DOM mutation breakpoints and inactive CSS rule indicators in the DevTools, several new CSS text properties, two-value display syntax, and JS numeric separators." See the release notes for more details.

  • Firefox 70 new contributors
  • The Illusion of choice and the need for default privacy protection

    Since July 2019, Firefox’s Enhanced Tracking Protection has blocked over 450 Billion third-party tracking requests from exploiting user data for profit. This shocking number reveals the sheer scale of online tracking and it highlights why the current advertising industry push on transparency, choice and “consent” as a solution to online privacy simply won’t work. The solutions put forth by other tech companies and the ad industry provide the illusion of choice. Let’s step through the reasons why that is and why we ultimately felt it necessary to enable Enhanced Tracking Protection by default.

Mozilla talking privacy and security

  • Firefox privacy protections reveal who’s trying to track you

    You could say that a web browser is kind of like a car. The engine drives you where you want to go, and a dashboard tells you what’s happening under the hood. And cars these days have dashboards that go beyond the basics of your speed and fuel level. They also alert you to things you might not realize, like when you need to brake and if you’re driving in a blind spot. The latest Firefox has a new privacy protections dashboard that reveals who’s trying to track you behind the scenes and helps you stop them.

  • New password security features come to Firefox with Lockwise

    Remembering unique, strong passwords for all your accounts and apps is a challenge, but it’s also essential for good digital security. We’re making that easier by helping you generate and manage passwords with Firefox Lockwise — all seamlessly, straight from your browser. Here’s how the new password security features work.

  • No Judgment Digital Definitions: What is a web tracker?

    Let’s say you’re on an outdoor pizza oven website dreaming about someday owning one. Mmm pizza. Next you switch gears and visit a fitness site; low and behold an ad for the pizza oven you were just looking at is there, too. Then you go to YouTube to see how easy it would be to build your own pizza oven (it’s too hard), but first you have to sit through an advertisement about, you guessed it, that same pizza oven. Time to check Instagram on your phone, and there it is again, grinning at you as a sponsored post in your feed.

  • No-judgment digital definitions: What are social media trackers?

    Let’s be honest. We’re usually pretty particular about what we post on social media, right? When we’re on vacation, we’ll post photos on Facebook of a beautiful sunset… and crop out the guy wearing the “no shirt, no shoes, no problem” T-shirt. We’ll post on LinkedIn about our exciting new job… but not that we were laid off four months earlier and self-medicated with pints of ice cream.

    While we choose what we want to share with our friends and followers, we don’t get to choose what those social media platforms learn about us behind the scenes.

Firefox 70 Is Out Today with the Ability to “Track the Trackers”

  • Firefox 70 Is Out Today with the Ability to “Track the Trackers”

    Mozilla has today released Firefox 70.0 for all platforms. The previous version of the browser arrived with Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) enabled by default on all platforms. The latest version of this privacy-focused browser ups the game by also bringing Social tracking protection - which blocks cross-site tracking cookies from sites like Facebook and Twitter - under the Standard settings. [The browser offers Standard, Strict, and Custom privacy settings.]

    The company said that since July 2 it has blocked over 450 billion tracking requests that attempted to follow Firefox users. Mozilla added that all of this happened behind the scenes but the growing threat to privacy warrants more visibility to these efforts.

Firefox 70 Released with New App Icon

CSS Changes

  • The two-value syntax of the CSS Display property

    If you like to read release notes, then you may have spotted in the Firefox 70 notes a line about the implementation of the two-value syntax of the display CSS property. Or maybe you saw a mention in yesterday’s Firefox 70 roundup post. Today I’ll explain what this means, and why understanding this two-value syntax is important despite only having an implementation in Firefox right now.

    [...]

    We can then take a look at the newer value of display, flow-root. If you give an element display: flow-root it becomes a new block formatting context, becoming the root element for a new normal flow. Essentially, this causes floats to be contained. Also, margins on child elements stay inside the container rather than collapsing with the margin of the parent.

    In the next CodePen, you can compare the first example without display: flow-root and the second with display: flow-root. The image in the first example pokes out of the bottom of the box, as it has been taken out of normal flow. Floated items are taken out of flow and shorten the line boxes of the content that follows. However, the actual box does not contain the element, unless that box creates a new block formatting context.

    The second example does have flow-root and you can see how the box with the grey background now contains the float, leaving a gap underneath the text. If you have ever contained floats by setting overflow to auto, then you were achieving the same thing, as overflow values other than the default visible create a new block formatting context. However, there can be some additional unwanted effects such as clipping of shadows or unexpected scrollbars. Using flow-root gives you the creation of a block formatting context (BFC) without anything else happening.

ZDNet coverage

  • Mozilla's Firefox 70 is out: Privacy reports reveal whose cookies are tracking you

    If Firefox users want to see which specific advertising firms are tracking them across sites, they can click on the shield icon and scroll down to "Blocked" and check which social media and third-party ad cookies are currently being blocked on a site.

    Firefox users can view how many social-media trackers, cross-site tracking cookies, fingerprinting scripts, and cryptominers the browser has blocked each day during the past week.

    Firefox doesn't play the competitive role it once served against Microsoft's Internet Explorer. However, Mozilla believes its anti-tracking technology and individual privacy reports can counter the ad industry's misleading and confusing tracking consent forms, ostensibly adopted as part of a push for greater transparency.

    "The solutions put forth by other tech companies and the ad industry provide the illusion of choice," argues Mozilla.

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