Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSI Announces Appointment of New Board Directors

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is pleased to announce the appointments of Deb Bryant and Tracy Hinds to fill the two vacant seats on the OSI Board of Directors. Their terms will begin immediately and run through October 2021. We hope you will join us in welcoming both to the OSI.

Deb Bryant is returning to the OSI Board after spending several years away. After spending her days as the Senior Director of the Open Source Programs Office at Red Hat, Deb volunteers for open source organizations and supports the open source community. Bryant is passionate about open and transparent governments, bringing open source technology and ideas into the public sector.

Tracy Hinds has an impressive history of managing development, operations, and growth for non-profit and for-profit organizations. Previous Education and Community Manager as well as Board Director of the OpenJS(formerly Node.js) Foundation, Hinds now works as Head of Platform at Samsung NEXT and is the president of GatherScript, where she works to support startup engagement and community, inspired by her prior work as a web engineer, community builder, OSS advocate, and strategist.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Cleverly Reimagined Slax Distro Pushes Portable Linux's Limits

Slax runs on a wide range of different file systems, including EXT (ext2,ext3,ext4), btrfs, and even FAT and NTFS. It took me about one hour to download the must-have computing applications and accessory tools that fit my needs. The installation of each program takes longer than a distro installed to a hard drive. USB drives are much slower than an internal hard drive. Once I had all of my needed software up and running, I generally was pleased with how Slax Linux performed. Slax is not a perfect Linux platform, at least not yet -- but for me its convenience and flexibility outweigh its current shortcomings. Read more

IBM: SystemD, Red Hat Stuff and Fedora

  • systemd 244-RC1 Released With Many Changes

    It looks like a big new systemd release will be out in time for Christmas. The first release candidate of systemd 244 was made available today for testing. Systemd 244-RC1 has also already been uploaded to the likes of Fedora Rawhide for further vetting.

  • Artificial Intelligence Apps with TensorFlow and Joget on OpenShift

    Containers and Kubernetes are key to accelerating the ML lifecycle as these technologies provide data scientists the much needed agility, flexibility, portability, and scalability to train, test, and deploy ML models.  Red Hat OpenShift is the industry’s leading containers and Kubernetes hybrid cloud platform. It provides all the above benefits, and through the integrated DevOps capabilities and integration with hardware accelerators, OpenShift enables better collaboration between data scientists and software developers. This helps accelerate the roll out of intelligent applications across hybrid cloud (data center, edge, and public clouds). Joget is an open source no-code/low-code application platform that empowers non-coders to visually build and maintain apps anytime, anywhere. By accelerating and democratizing app development, Joget is a natural fit for modern Kubernetes Hybrid Cloud platforms like Red Hat OpenShift. 

  • Break down support system silos with agile integration and modernize telco customer and network operations

    When any systems – including communications service provider (CSP) operations support systems (OSS) and business support systems (BSS) – are delivered with a narrow, siloed purpose, they tend to be pretty inflexible. As CSPs look to transform their businesses for success in increasingly competitive and dynamic markets, this inflexibility can stall their modernization efforts. Service providers rely on OSS/BSS to support their services. But for many providers, their OSS/BSS generally lack interoperability. This can limit the exchange of data and access to metrics needed to synthesize more holistic views and address complex problems among the disparate systems. Bottom line: without close integration between OSS and BSS, CSPs may struggle to become digital service providers.

  • Fedora Atomic Host Nearing End Of Life

    Fedora 29 will be End Of Life soon. With it Fedora Atomic Host will have its last incremental release (based on the Fedora 29 stream). Please move to the Fedora CoreOS preview if you can. Last year we introduced the plans for Fedora CoreOS including that Fedora CoreOS would be the successor to Fedora Atomic Host and Container Linux (from CoreOS Inc.). As part of that succession plan we decided that Fedora 29 Atomic Host would be the last stream of Fedora Atomic Host to be released. Fedora 29 Atomic Host has served us well, but with Fedora 29 End of Life coming soon , so will the last release of Fedora 29 Atomic Host. The next release of Fedora 29 Atomic Host (in the next few weeks) will be the last two-week release. It will contain all of the latest content from Fedora 29. After that release, Fedora 29, and Fedora 29 Atomic Host will no longer receive any updates.

  • PHP version 7.2.25 and 7.3.12

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.12 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30-31 and in remi-php73 repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS). RPM of PHP version 7.2.25 are available in remi repository for Fedora 29 and in remi-php72 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Sharing Fedora

    For example, if you go out to lunch with a group of colleagues periodically, you might find it natural to talk about Fedora with them. If someone shows interest, you can suggest to get together with them for a Fedora show and tell. There isn’t any need for formal presentations or prepared talks. This is just having lunch and sharing information with people you know. When you’re with friends, relatives, colleagues, or neighbors, conversation often turns to things computer related, and you can bring up Fedora. There are usually opportunities to point out how Fedora would partially if not completely address their concerns or provide something they want. These are people you know so talking with them is easy and natural. You probably know the kind of things they use PCs for, so you know the features of Fedora that will be attractive to them. Such conversations can start anytime you see someone you know. You don’t need to steer conversations toward Fedora — that might be impolite, depending on the situation. But if they bring up computer related issues, you might find an opportunity to talk about Fedora.

Mesa 19.2.6

Hi list,

I'm releasing a new mesa 19.2.x release to address being unable to compile on
PPC due to a bad backport. There are a couple of additional patches in here
because I didn't want to tease them apart and they're all stable anyway.

Dylan

Shortlog
========

Alejandro Piñeiro (1):
      v3d: adds an extra MOV for any sig.ld*

Dave Airlie (1):
      llvmpipe/ppc: fix if/ifdef confusion in backport.

Dylan Baker (4):
      docs/relnotes/19.2.5: Add SHA256 sum
      meson: generate .pc files for gles and gles2 with old glvnd
      docs: Add release notes for 19.2.6
      VERSION: bumpre to 19.2.6

Eric Engestrom (1):
      vulkan: delete typo'd header

Hyunjun Ko (1):
      freedreno/ir3: fix printing output registers of FS.

Jose Maria Casanova Crespo (1):
      v3d: Fix predication with atomic image operations

Yevhenii Kolesnikov (1):
      glsl: Enable textureSize for samplerExternalOES



git tag: mesa-19.2.6
Read more Also: Mesa 19.2.6 Released Due To POWER Fallout

GNU Guile 2.9.5 (beta) released

We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.5, the fifth beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series. See the release announcement for full details and a download link. Besides the usual set of optimizations, this release adds an --r6rs option for better R6RS support out of the box, and also adds a new --r7rs corresponding to R&RS. Guile's core exception handling has also been rebased onto the raise-exception and with-exception-handler primitives, enabling better compatibility going forward with structured exception objects, which are more common in the broader Scheme community than Guile's old throw and catch. GNU Guile 2.9.5 is a beta release, and as such offers no API or ABI stability guarantees. Users needing a stable Guile are advised to stay on the stable 2.2 series. Read more