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today's leftovers

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  • Molly de Blanc: Autonomy and consent

    When I was an undergraduate, I took a course on medical ethics. The core takeaways from the class were that autonomy is necessary for consent, and consent is necessary for ethical action.

    There is a reciprocal relationship between autonomy and consent. We are autonomous creatures, we are self-governing. In being self-governing, we have the ability to consent, to give permission to others to interact with us in the ways we agree on. We can only really consent when we are self-governing, otherwise, it’s not proper consent. Consent also allows us to continue to be self-governing. By giving others permission, we are giving up some control, but doing so on our own terms.

    In order to actually consent, we have to grasp the situation we’re in, and as much about it as possible. Decision making needs to come from a place of understanding.

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: User Mode Linux 5.2

    User Mode Linux version 5.2 has been uploaded to Debian Unstable and will soon be available on the supported architectures. This upload took more time than usual as I ran into a build time failure caused by newer PCAP library.

    Thanks to active upstream developers, this got sorted out quick. In the longer run, we may have a much better fix for it.

  • PCLinuxOS MATE Review

    Published for Patreons on Oct 8th 2019. Available to the public Oct. 17th, 2019 – Become a Patreon today to get this plus exclusive Linux tips not found anywhere else!

  • Worn Out EMMC Chips Are Crippling Older Teslas

    Much like the rockets and spacecraft of sister company SpaceX, Tesla’s vehicles are powered by Linux running on what’s essentially off-the-shelf computing hardware. Until 2018 the Model S and X were running the open source operating system on a NVIDIA Tegra 3, at which point they switched the Media Control Unit (MCU) over to an Intel Atom solution. In either event, the Linux system is stored on an embedded Multi-Media Controller (eMMC) flash chip instead of a removable storage device as you might expect.

    Now under normal circumstances, this wouldn’t be an issue. There are literally billions of devices running Linux from an eMMC chip. But any competent embedded Linux developer would take the steps necessary to make sure the operating system’s various log files are not being written to a non-replaceable storage device soldered onto the board

    Unfortunately, for reasons that still remain somewhat unclear, the build of Linux running on the MCU is doing exactly that. What’s worse, Tesla’s graphical interface appears to be generating its own additional log messages. Despite the likelihood that nobody will ever actually read them, for every second a Tesla is driving down the road, more lines are being added to the log files.

    Now, it appears that the near continuous writing of data to the eMMC chips on the older Tegra-based MCUs has finally started to take its toll. Owners on Tesla forums are reporting that their MCUs are crashing and leaving the expensive vehicles in “Limp Home Mode”, which allows the car to remain drivable but unable to charge. The prescribed fix for this issue by Tesla is a complete MCU replacement at the cost of several thousand dollars. As this failure will almost certainly happen after the factory warranty has lapsed, the owner will have to foot the bill themselves.

  • Seven more videos from the auditorium at LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Yes, here’s anther bunch of videos from our recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain.

  • Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6

    My new book, Self-publishing using LibreOffice Writer 6, is now available in paperback or PDF.

  • Montreal Subway Foot Traffic Data

    STM kindly sent me daily values for each subway stations from 2001 to 2018. Armed with all this data, I decided to play a little with R and came up with some interesting graphs.

    Behold this semi-interactive map of Montreal's subway! By clicking on a subway station, you'll be redirected to a graph of the station's foot traffic.

  • Is your Internet up-to-date?

    Modern Internet Standards provide for more reliability and further growth of the Internet. Are you using them?

  • Call of Duty: Modern Warfare ditches loot boxes for a battle pass

    Popularized by Fortnite, the battle pass system allows for players to buy the pass at the beginning of the season, and unlock a variety of items as they progress. Modern Warfare’s system sounds like it’ll be extremely similar to the Fortnite model (which has since been adopted by other major titles, like Destiny 2 and PUBG). Players will be able to buy a pass at the beginning of a season, with full transparency as to what the items included are, and how and when they’ll be unlocked.

  • Innr Smart White A19 bulb review: This inexpensive smart bulb seamlessly connects with a Philips Hue Bridge

    If you’re shopping for your first smart bulb and you’re not ready to invest in a hub, an Innr bulb isn’t the cheapest way to go. Instead, you’d be better off with a Bluetooth- or Wi-Fi-enabled bulb that can operate with just a smartphone app. The latest Philips Hue White bulb, for example, which can be controlled via Bluetooth as well as Zigbee), or a Wi-Fi-connected bulb like the $8 Wyze Bulb, which offers the bonus of being color-temperature-tunable.

  • The Untold Story of the 2018 Olympics Cyberattack, the Most Deceptive [Computer Attack] in History [iophk: Windows TCO]

    All nine of the Olympic staff's domain controllers, the powerful machines that governed which employee could access which computers in the network, had somehow been paralyzed, crippling the entire system. The staff decided on a temporary workaround: They set all the surviving servers that powered some basic services, such as Wi-Fi and the internet-linked TVs, to bypass the dead gatekeeper machines. By doing so, they managed to bring those bare-minimum systems back online just minutes before the end of the ceremony.

  • [Old] Olympic Destroyer Takes Aim At Winter Olympics

    The purpose is to copy the initial stage to the remote system in %ProgramData%\%COMPUTERNAME%.exe and to execute it via a VBScript.

More in Tux Machines

Camus Video Chat: The Open-source Privacy-aware Video Cat Meeting tool that you have been waiting for

Camus is a lightweight cross-platform real-time peer-to-peer video chat application. It's built with Python3 and ready to be deployed on server with simple few steps. We have reviewed and listed several open-source video applications on Medevel.com, but most of them require time and skills to install and use. It's not the case with Camu which is created by a solo developer using several technologies to make it a good alternative for Google Meet, meet.jit.si and of course zoom. In glance, Camus offers similar functionalities to the competing apps like text messaging, customizable video quality, high audio quality and desktop sharing. It's also can be installed easily on any Linux distribution that support Snap or on a web server with Docker. The main reason why do like Camus is its easy install as it takes far more time to install and configure than most of the alternative apps we tested and used before. Read more Also: Empathy first: Driving growth through people leadership

Devices/Embedded: NanoPi, Arduino and More

  • NanoPi R4S SBC launched with optional metal case for $45 and up

    We found NanoPi R4S board in a work-in-progress Wiki last month. The tiny single board computer is designed for headless applications but comes with much better specifications compared to similar boards with a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor with up to 4GB RAM, dual Gigabit Ethernet, and USB 3.0 ports. At the time we had limited information, but FriendlyELEC has now started selling the board for $45 and up, together with an optional metal case for a fanless operation that should ensure very good cooling.

  • Rockchip RK3568 processor to power edge computing and NVR applications

    We recently reported on the Rockchip developer conference (RKDC) 2020, and especially the upcoming Rockchip RK3588 Cortex-A76/A55 processor that packs a lot of power and features, and is now scheduled to launch in Q3 2021. But as you can imagine there were other products revealed during the conference, including the new Rockchip RK3568, similar to the previously announced RK3566, and designed for edge computing and network video recorder (NVR) applications.

  • Tiger Lake module supports industrial models

    Portwell’s “PCOM-B656VGL” Compact Type 6 module runs on 11th Gen Core CPUs including embedded “E” and industrial “GRE” models with up to 64GB DDR4-3200, 4x displays, 4x USB 3.2 Gen2, and 9x PCIe lanes, including 4x Gen4.

  • i.MX8M based SMARC module adds crypto chip and optional TSN

    Adlink’s rugged, Linux-ready “LEC-iMX8M” SMARC module combines a quad -A53 i.MX8M with a crypto chip plus up to 4GB DDR3L, up to 64GB eMMC, and support for HDMI 2.0a with 4K, 2x MIPI-CSI2, and up to 2x GbE with optional TSN. Earlier this month, we reported on Adlink’s SMARC 2.1 form-factor LEC-IMX8MP module with NXP’s AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus. Adlink has also posted a preliminary product page for a SMARC 2.1 module that builds on the standard, similarly quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M. The rugged LEC-iMX8M module is notable for its additional, AES-128-enabled cryptography chip with hardware key storage for up to 16 keys, certificates, or data.

  • Arduino Blog » Creating a continuum tentacle-like robot with Arduino

    Continuum robots — which look like a tentacle or perhaps an elephant’s trunk — use a series of linkage sections and internal tendons to move both horizontally and vertically. While they may seem quite exotic, in the video below element14 Presents’ DJ Harrigan breaks down how he built one with an Arduino Mega and a fairly simple list of parts.

Oracle/Red Hat/Fedora: Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment, ABRT, XWayland, Satellite and Ansible

  • Announcing Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment Release 1.2

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment Release 1.2. This release includes several enhancements focused on improving the security and compliance of customer environments. Release 1.2 also includes new versions of core components, including Kubernetes, CRI-O, Kata Containers, and Istio. Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment is an integrated suite of software components for the development and management of cloud-native applications. Based on the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Open Container Initiative standards, Oracle Linux Cloud Native Environment delivers a simplified framework for installations, updates, upgrades, and configuration of key features for orchestrating microservices.

  • EOL of EL6 and EL7 and removal Customer portal support - ABRT

    For a long time, we talked about EOLing EL6 and EL7. What does it actually mean? RHEL 6 is going to be EOL at the end of this month (30th November 2020). We will no longer build ABRT packages for EL6 and we will stop supporting EL6 as content. RHEL 7 is still active but quite old. ABRT team will stop testing, building, and developing on top of RHEL7. We are going to focus on RHEL 8 and upcoming RHEL and Fedora. We still support RHEL 7 as content (e.g., in ABRT Analytics).

  • Fedora Looks To Provide Standalone XWayland Package Tracking X.Org Server Git - Phoronix

    With the X.Org Server being "abandonware" but at the same time the upstream XWayland portion of the codebase continuing to be worked on, Fedora developers at Red Hat are looking at splitting XWayland into its own standalone package to make it easier to ship it without having to use the rest of the xorg-server code-base. While Red Hat developers previously worked to manage X.Org Server releases, there isn't much upside to that these days and they would rather ship a standalone XWayland package for Fedora users rather than go through the process of new xorg-server releases.

  • Preparing for RHEL Extended Life Cycle Support with Red Hat Satellite and the Ansible Automation Platform

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6 was introduced more than 10 years ago, on November 9, 2010. Originally branched from Fedora 12, RHEL 6 has spent the last 10 years faithfully running Linux workloads. After more than a decade of faithful service, RHEL 6’s lifespan is nearly up: on November 30th, RHEL 6 will move out of Maintenance Support 2 and into Extended Life Cycle Support (ELS). Today, we’ll walk through how to prepare our Red Hat Satellite server for the switch of RHEL 6 to ELS, as well as adjusting our currently registered systems. We’ll be doing both of these things via Ansible and the newly introduced redhat.satellite Ansible Collection.

Kernel: IWD, OpenZFS and Mesa

  • Intel IWD 1.10 With DHCP v6 Support - Phoronix

    Version 1.10 of Intel's IWD "iNet Wireless Daemon" has been released as the increasingly useful alternative to the likes of WPA_Supplicant for Linux systems. Intel's open-source wireless daemon for Linux systems continues adding in more features and improvements. While it started out with a focus on minimalism and embedded use-cases, IWD is being evaluated for possible use on Ubuntu among other Linux distributions.

  • Notable Developer Starts Patreon to Fund Apple Silicon Linux Port - MacRumors

    Developer Hector Martin, who describes himself as someone who "likes putting Linux on things," has launched a plan create a Linux port for Apple Silicon Macs.

  • OpenZFS 2.0 Released With Unified FreeBSD/Linux Support, Many New Features - Phoronix

    OpenZFS 2.0 has been officially released! OpenZFS 2.0 marks a major step forward for open-source ZFS file-system support for what started out as ZFSOnLinux but is now OpenZFS with unified FreeBSD and Linux support (macOS support is still being pursued as well) and this release also bringing many new features.

  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 20.3.0-rc3
    Hi list,
    
    Mesa 20.3-rc3 is now available for general consumption. This is a few
    days late thanks to the US Thanksgiving holiday. I think we're
    pretty close to having .0 this week, just one issue left on the tracker.
    
    Dylan
    
  • Mesa 20.3 Is Near With Lavapipe Vulkan, Raspberry Pi V3DV, Better AMD RDNA2 Support - Phoronix

    The weekly release candidates of Mesa 20.3 fell off the wagon last week due to the US Thanksgiving holiday but now is updated today for Mesa 20.3-RC3. Mesa 20.3-RC3 is out and things are looking good for the stable release potentially in a week or two. There remains just one blocker bug left before Mesa 20.3.0 could be cleared for release.