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Canonical releases Ubuntu Linux 19.10 Eoan Ermine with GNOME 3.34, light theme, and Raspberry Pi 4 support

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Ubuntu

Thank God for Linux. No, seriously, regardless of your beliefs, you should be thankful that we have the Linux kernel to provide us with a free alternative to Windows 10. Lately, Microsoft's operating system has been plagued by buggy updates, causing some Windows users to lose faith in it. Hell, even Dona Sarkar -- the now-former leader of the Windows Insider program -- has been relieved of her duties and transitioned to a new role within the company (read into that what you will).

While these are indeed dark times for Windows, Linux remains that shining beacon of light. When Windows becomes unbearable, you can simply use Chrome OS, Android, Fedora, Manjaro, or some other Linux distribution. Today, following the beta period, one of the best and most popular Linux-based desktop operating systems reaches a major milestone -- you can now download Ubuntu 19.10! Code-named "Eoan Ermine" (yes, I know, it's a terrible name), the distro is better and faster then ever.

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How To Install Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine to USB Stick

  • How To Install Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine to USB Stick with UEFI Guide

    This tutorial explains steps to install Ubuntu 19.10 safely to your computer either with BIOS or UEFI initialization system. This tutorial mainly guides you to install the OS into an external storage and hence USB Flash Drive is used, but you can practice same installation into normal internal storages, namely Hard Disk Drive (HDD) and Solid State Disk (SSD). You will create at least 2 partitions, and particularly add 1 more partition if your computer is UEFI-based system, and perform 8 steps to finish the installation. Happy working with Eoan Ermine!

Ubuntu 19.10 Has Two Outstanding New Features For Linux Users

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Has Two Outstanding New Features For Linux Users

    Ubuntu 19.10 officially launches today, and if this release is any indication, next year’s Ubuntu 20.04 LTS “Focal Fossa” is going to be one outstanding desktop Linux distribution. But let’s not dismiss the OS you can actually install today. What makes 19.10 so special to me personally? ZFS and great graphics card support.

    Ubuntu 19.10 delivers a pair of welcome advancements for anyone using an Nvidia GPU, and anyone rocking newer 7nm Navi graphics cards from AMD, such as the Radeon 5700 XT.

    First is something I’ve been calling for due to the more performant nature of the proprietary Nvidia graphics driver: it’s right on the Ubuntu 19.10 ISO now, and you can choose to install it over the open source Nouveau driver, which is particularly useful if you want to play games.

How to Upgrade Ubuntu 19.04 to Ubuntu 19.10

  • How to Upgrade Ubuntu 19.04 to Ubuntu 19.10

    With the release of Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) knocking at the door, it's time to upgrade your existing Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) installations.

    Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) is the latest version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, featuring the newest Linux 5.3 kernel series and the GNOME 3.33 desktop environment, as well as up-to-date core components and apps, including LibreOffice 6.3, Mozilla Firefox 69, Mozilla Thunderbird 68, PulseAudio 13, GCC 9.2.1, and more.

    Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) was released earlier this year on April 18th, and it will only be supported for nine months, until January 2020. Therefore, if you're using it on your personal computer, we think it will be a good idea to upgrade to Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) right now by following the next instructions.

Ubuntu 19.10 arrives with edge capabilities for Kubernetes

  • Ubuntu 19.10 arrives with edge capabilities for Kubernetes, integrated AI developer experience

    Following 25 weeks of development, Canonical today released Ubuntu 19.10. Highlights include new edge capabilities for Kubernetes, an integrated AI developer experience, and the fastest GNOME desktop performance yet. You can download Ubuntu 19.10 from here.

    Kubernetes (stylized as k8s) was originally designed by Google and is now maintained by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Kubernetes is an open source container-orchestration system. MicroK8s, meanwhile, is a CNCF-certified upstream Kubernetes deployment that runs entirely on your workstation or edge device.

    Ubuntu 19.10 brings strict confinement to MicroK8s, ensuring complete isolation and a tightly secured production-grade Kubernetes environment. MicroK8s add-ons (like Istio, Knative, CoreDNS, Prometheus, and Jaeger) can now be deployed at the edge with a single command. Raspberry Pi 4 supports Ubuntu 19.10, meaning you can orchestrate workloads at the edge with MicroK8s for just $35.

    Additionally, Ubuntu 19.10 ships with the Train release of Charmed OpenStack. The included live migration extensions let users move machines from one hypervisor to another without shutting down.

A couple more articles

  • Ubuntu 19.10 delivers goodies for gamers and a slick new Gnome desktop

    Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’ has been unleashed on the world, with Nvidia driver support built right in, and a new faster, more responsive Gnome desktop, with lots of major improvements for business users, too.

    The good news for gamers is that Nvidia’s graphics driver is now embedded right in the ISO image, so it’s there from the get-go (as opposed to being offered up as a download during installation).

    That’s nicely convenient, of course, because Nvidia’s official drivers are the only realistic way to go for gamers on Linux – while open source alternatives like Nouveau might be coming on, they still aren’t a patch (no pun intended) on Nvidia’s proprietary driver.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine,” Available Now

    Ubuntu 19.10 is available for download today. Upgrading isn’t mandatory—in fact, most people stick with the long-term service (LTS) releases and upgrade just once every two years when the next one comes out. The last LTS release was Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver.”

    For some people, if the latest release isn’t a Long Term Support (LTS) release, the question “should I upgrade?” is a no-brainer. Canonical estimates that 95 percent of Ubuntu installations are running LTS versions. Ubuntu 19.10 isn’t an LTS release; it is an interim release. The next LTS is due out in April 2020, when Ubuntu 20.04 is going to be delivered.

    If 95 percent stick with LTS releases, those who do upgrade to interim releases are very much in the minority. But there’s always going to be users who want the newest shiny things. They’re going to upgrade. Period. The fact that there’s a new version is reason enough.

    So we’ve got the LTS-only users in the “definitely won’t upgrade” camp, and the give-me-the-new-version-now users in the “definitely will upgrade” camp. If neither of those is you, you must be in the “I might upgrade if there’s something compelling about this new release” camp. Here’s our quick run-down so you can make up your mind.

Ubuntu 19.10 is Now Available to Download

  • Ubuntu 19.10 is Now Available to Download

    Ubuntu 19.10 is the 31st version of Ubuntu to be released since 2006. It’s backed by 9 months of ongoing updates, and will be followed by Ubuntu 20.04 LTS ‘Focal Fossa’ in April of next year.

    Six months of plucky development, one freshly prepped Linux kernel, and a giant GNOME release later and the ‘Eoan Ermine’ is good to go (i.e. ready to download).

    Read on for a quick overview of what’s new (check out our full guide for more) or skip straight to the download to grab your copy ahead of its formal release.

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Is Now Available to Download

  • Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Is Now Available to Download

    While Canonical hasn't yet publish an official announcement for Ubuntu 19.10, which has been in development during the past six months, they released the ISO images for all official flavors. These downloads aren't visible to the untrained eye, but we got you covered, so head to the downloads below if you can't wait anymore.

    Dubbed Eoan Ermine, Ubuntu 19.10 comes packed with the latest Linux 5.3 kernel series and GNOME 3.34 desktop environment, an up-to-date toolchain, and various new features and enhancements, among which we can mention embedded Nvidia drivers, additional default hardening options enabled in GCC, WPA3 support, ZFS on root in the installer, and new themes.

Ubuntu 19.10 Available For Download With Its GNOME 3.34

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Available For Download With Its GNOME 3.34 + Experimental ZFS Experience

    Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" has hit mirrors today for an on-time release of this six-month non-LTS installment to Ubuntu Linux.

    Ubuntu 19.10 is a bit more lively than some of the recent Ubuntu releases otherwise, thanks to GNOME 3.34 being a big update on the desktop (including many upstream contributions from the likes of Canonical's Daniel van Vugt), Linux 5.3 being a solid kernel release, and the experimental ZFS root file-system support from Ubiquity coming together at the last moments of the cycle. So, simply put, Ubuntu 19.10 highlights largely come down to:

    - GNOME 3.34 is the default desktop and is quite exciting thanks to its many upstream improvements, including better performance and -- assuming you opt for the non-default session on Ubuntu -- much better Wayland support.

Ubuntu 19.10 on the edge: Raspberry Pi 4 support and MicroK8s

  • Ubuntu 19.10 on the edge: Raspberry Pi 4 support and MicroK8s

    Ubuntu 19.10 debuts “strict confinement” support for MicroK8s — Canonical’s snap-deployed, single-node Kubernetes environment — enabling easier deployment of k8s containers on edge gateways. MicroK8s can even run on the newly supported RPi 4.

    Canonical’s Ubuntu project released Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” with loads of new features for the desktop and cloud. Yet, it also delivered some shiny new objects for the embedded/edge world. First and shiniest is support for the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B. The second is the addition of “strict confinement” support for Canonical’s MicroK8s Kubernetes environment for single-node clusters, enabling easier deployment on edge devices. In addition, the Kubeflow machine learning toolkit for Kubernetes is now available as an add-on to MicroK8s.

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