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Purism Partners with Halo Privacy to Bring Extra Security to Its Linux Devices

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Linux
Security

Purism is already known for providing top notch security and privacy for its Linux laptops and phones, but with the new partnership with Halo Privacy, the company wants to bring strong cryptography and custom managed attribution techniques to secure communications from direct attacks.

These new, unique security stack provided by Halo Privacy works together with Purism's state-of-the-art security implementations for its Linux devices, including the Librem Key USB security token with tamper detection and PureBoot secure UEFI replacement, to cryptographically guarantee signing of the lowest level of firmware and user's privacy.

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The original press release

  • Halo Privacy partners with Purism

    Halo Privacy partners with Purism to provide best-in-class secure hardware devices to large enterprise customers in defense, aerospace, and the cryptocurrency/fintech sector.

    Halo is excited to deliver solutions utilizing Purism’s industry unique security stack across Librem Laptops, the Librem 5 phone, and including the recently released Made in the USA Librem Key. This advanced security combines hardware with PureBoot, Purism’s UEFI replacement (combining coreboot, Heads, TPM, and Librem Key), to cryptographically guarantee signing of the lowest level of hardware and firmware.

    Halo Privacy, combines custom managed attribution techniques with strong cryptography to secure communications from direct attack while maintaining confidentiality for a user’s identity. By integrating with the Purism suite, Halo significantly reduces the attack surface while providing strong assurance based on the integrity of Purism’s supply chain.

    Building on a foundation of shared enthusiasm for privacy and control, Purism and Halo Privacy are happy to announce a partnership focused around delivering Purism hardware into Halo Privacy’s Corona & Eclipse secure communications platforms. Halo is a solutions partner with its network of Government and private sector clients. As an additional step, Halo is allocating developer resources to deliver additional functionality on Purism’s platform.

    “Halo Privacy has proven to be an instrumental partner with Purism, helping shape some of the security products by getting involved in the early phases of development and product purchasing.” says Todd Weaver, Founder & CEO of Purism.

    “When looking to mitigate the supply chain risk in publicly available hardware offerings, nothing compares to Purism. Delivering solutions using the foundational strength of Purism’s products provides an unparalleled level of confidence and control” says Lance Gaines, Founder & CTO of Halo Privacy.

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