Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

More in Tux Machines

3D Subscription software driving move to open source

3D software makers' move to subscription models is pushing people to use open-source software because users are fed up with the price and neurotic terms and conditions. For a while now professional 3D software like 3DMax, Maya, AutoCAD (Autodesk) and Substance Painter (Adobe) are only available on a monthly or yearly subscription basis which means that you cannot get your paws on a perpetual license for these industry-standard 3D tools anymore, cannot offline install or activate the tools, and the tools also phone home every few days over the internet to see whether you have "paid your rent". This means if you stop paying your "rent" the software shuts down, leaving you unable to even look at any 3D project files you may have created with software. But this has created so much frustration, concern and anxiety among 3D content creators that, increasingly, everybody is trying to replace their commercial 3D software with Open Source 3D tools. Read more

GNU: denemo 2.3, Guix on CentOS 7 and GNU World Order

Intel: oneAPI and IWD 1.1

  • Intel Releases oneAPI Base Toolkit Beta For Performance-Focused, Cross-Device Software

    The oneAPI Base Toolkit is for writing code that runs across CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs among other possible accelerators. The primary programming language is their Data Parallel C++ and SYCL fits into the toolchain as well. OpenMP and MPI are supported with the oneAPI HPC toolkit. While other components include the oneAPI IoT Toolkit for developing IoT software and the oneAPI rendering toolkit for ray-tracing and visual rendering. The different toolkits can be found here.

  • IWD 1.1 Released For Intel's Linux Wireless Daemon

    IWD 1.0 stabilized this wireless daemon's interfaces and made it ready for embedded and desktop use-cases as an alternative to the likes of WPA-Supplicant. With IWD 1.1 are just a few changes amounting to some basic fixes while the new feature is radio resource management.

Programming Leftovers

  • What is -pipe and should you use it?

    This argument may have been needed in the ye olden times of supporting tens of broken commercial unixes. Nowadays the only platform where this might make a difference is Windows, given that its file system is a lot slower than Linux's. But is its pipe implementation any faster? I don't know, and I'll let other people measure that. The "hindsight is perfect" design lesson to be learned Looking at this now, it is fairly easy to see that this command line option should not exist. Punting the responsibility of knowing whether files or pipes are faster (or even work) on any given platform to the user is poor usability. Most people don't know that and performance characteristics of operating systems change over time. Instead this should be handled inside the compiler with logic roughly like the following:

  • ABlog v0.10 released¶

    ABlog v0.10 is released with the main focus being to support the latest version of Sphinx as well as Python 3 only support. Ablog V0.9.X will no longer be supported as Python 2 comes to an end in a few months and it is time people upgraded.

  • How and why I built Sudoku Solver

    The process was pretty intensive first of all i went to the drawing board thinking of how to actually do this i drew a 3x3 matrix and thought how it could be done on this miniature matrix of 3x3.But figuring out the right path was difficult and to get inspiration or an idea as to how to solve this problem I started solving sudoku problems on my own easy to expert level but once I got a hang of them I got back to my project I noted down every technique or idea in the notebook that I always carried with me,I made sure not too look this up on google I wanted to build this thing from scratch on my own.Experimenting day after day lines of code stacking up it took me 15 days to complete the code and the moment correctly filled sudoku matrix was given out well I was on cloud nine.

  • Unconventional Secure and Asynchronous RESTful APIs using SSH

    Some time ago, in a desperate search for asynchronicity, I came across a Python package that changed the way I look at remote interfaces: AsyncSSH. Reading through their documentation and example code, you’ll find an interesting assortment of use cases. All of which take advantage of the authentication and encryption capabilities of SSH, while using Python’s asyncio to handle asynchronous communications. Thinking about various applications I’ve developed over the years, many included functions that could benefit from decoupling into separate services. But at times, I would avoid it due to security implications. I wanted to build informative dashboards that optimize maintenance tasks. But they bypassed business logic, so I wouldn’t dare expose them over the same interfaces. I even looked at using HTTPS client certs, but support from REST frameworks seemed limited.