Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

IBM Left in the Dark

Filed under
Mac

There's no shortage of rumors as to just what really went on between Apple and IBM with regards to the souring of their relationship, and rehearsing them all here would be an exercise in futility. However, John Markoff of the New York Times has offered his take, based in-part on "close sources," and I thought it worth mentioning here.

Apple purportedly pulled a bit of a fast one on IBM, with Jobs only informing IBM of the decision late in the day Friday, right before Monday's big announcement. IBM apparently learned of the possibility of the deal the way most of us did, through the early reports of the WSJ. The question is, why? Jobs' WWDC presentation heavily implied that IBM simply couldn't deliver. The infamous image of the missing 3GHz PowerMac behind Jobs on stage certainly made it seem like Big Blue couldn't get the job done, and Jobs came off looking like he had to make a tough, but thoroughly necessary decision. IBM, not surprisingly, tells it a different way.

"Technical issues were secondary to the business issues," said an executive close to the I.B.M. side of the negotiations. Because the business was not profitable, I.B.M. "decided not to continue to go ahead with the product road map."

In other words, Apple wasn't interested in paying IBM's prices, and the prices that they would pay weren't enough for IBM to consider taking the road map further. Given Apple's lack of fear with regards to impressive price tags, this leads me to think that IBM was potentially looking to increase the prices of the PowerPC 970 in a significant way to justify spending more time on the project. Then again, no one can deny that the PowerPC 970 had a heat problem. The water-cooled PowerMac, the non-existent G5 laptop, and the 1-year overdue 3GHz part are all signs of problems at IBM. How much more scratch did IBM want to make these problems go away, and was it certain that these problems could be solved by the almighty dollar? Jobs' actions seem to suggest that, if this scenario is correct, he apparently had little faith in IBM. That, or the Blue Man Group seemed like a smarter way to preserve those profit margins.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Open source now part of Romania’s Digital Agenda

All of Romania’s public administrations are to use open source and open standards software. The government is making this a (minute) part of the 2014-2020 Digital Agenda, made public in November. The approach will increase interoperability of ICT systems. Read more

GNU Binutils 2.25 Released With Port To Andes NDS32

The Binutils 2.25 changes include support for the Andes NDS32 architecture and new --data, --include-all-whitespace, and --dump-section options. Among the changes for GNU ld in Binutils 2.25 is support for the Andes NDS32 architecture, support for the OpenRISC and OR32 has been replaced with the OR1K port. Gas for Binutils 2.25 has support for AVR Tiny micro-controllers, support for the NDS32, and enhanced ARM support. The NDS32 enablement within the GNU stack has been going on for a while with last year GCC seeing a port to this architecture, etc. The NDS32 from Andes Technology is a 32-bit CPU architecture designed for embedded environments using the AndeStar ISA and the SoC processors are marketed under the AndesCore brand. Read more

2014 Year-End NVIDIA Linux Benchmark Comparison

For this article today, the major driver releases of the year for their mainline driver were benchmarked while ignoring some of the later drivers in each series that just shipped bug-fixes or new kernel / xorg-server support after a new driver series was already in beta or stable. The tested NVIDIA drivers for this article include the 331.38, 334.16, 337.12, 337.19, 340.17, 343.13, 343.22, 346.16, and 346.22 Linux x86_64 drivers. The 331 series was the last driver series from late 2013 for reference. The graphics card used for today's testing was a GeForce GTX 780 Ti (Kepler) graphics card as being a high performance GPU that's compatible with all of the driver releases tested throughout the year. Read more

Quadcopter drone packs first all-Linux APM autopilot

Erle Robotics launched a ROS-enabled, open source “Erle-brain” autopilot that runs APM directly on Linux. The device also powers an “Erle-copter” drone. Over the last year, Spanish firm Erle Robotics S.L. has been working with 3DRobotics to develop an open source BeaglePilot autopilot for drones that can run Linux on 3DR’s popular, Arduino-based APM (ArduPilot Mega) platform. The APM Linux port was developed by both companies, as well as several academic institutions. The BeagleBone-based “Erle-brain” autopilot is built into the $490-and-up Erle-copter quadcopter. Read more