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Ubuntu Core: Raspberry Pi 4 and Beyond

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Hardware
Ubuntu
  • Attaching a CPU fan to a RPi running Ubuntu Core

    When I purchased my Raspberry Pi4 I kind of expected it to operate under similar conditions as all the former Pi’s I owned …

    So I created an Ubuntu Core image for it (you can find info about this at Support for Raspberry Pi 4 on the snapcraft forum)

    Runnig lxd on this image off a USB3.1 SSD to build snap packages (it is faster than the Ubuntu Launchpad builders that are used for build.snapcraft.io, so a pretty good device for local development), I quickly noticed the device throttles a lot once it gets a little warmer, so I decided I need a fan.

  • A reference architecture for secure IoT device Management

    One of the key benefits of IoT is the ability to monitor and control connected devices remotely. This allows operators to interact with connected devices in a feedback loop, resulting in accelerated decisions. These interactions are mediated by a device management interface, which presents data in a user-friendly UI. The interface also serves as a client to remotely control devices in the field. Device management is, therefore, a key component of IoT solution stacks, with a significant impact on the ROI of such deployments.

    However, there is no one size fits all when it comes to device management solutions. IoT solutions are deployed in various contexts. The purpose, the devices, and the users involved vary from one deployment to another, even within the same industry. It is, therefore, challenging to find a ready-made device management solution perfectly suitable to any given deployment.

    Security is the critical requirement that these deployments invariably share, for it must be implemented in line with the best practices. Secure authentication and communication encryption are indispensable for the management of mission-critical device fleets.

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