Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software: Book Squire, isolcpus, GNU Health and rpminspect

Filed under
Software
  • Book Squire Is Ten Years Old

    I choose Python for the first version. I got the logging in, navigating of the Library site and the scraping of account data working as a script. Then decided to built it into an application running under the then new Google App Engine platform. That worked for a while just fine. Over time I added a database to store user information and an email notifications feature with nightly reports delivered when accounts had notable events worth mentioning.

    After working on a few Django applications I decided to move Book Squire to Django and host it on a VPS. Here it stayed for many years working well except for the random updates made to the Library site which broke the parsing of the pages.

    Eventually, the Library upgraded there system in a significant way. Actually made it somewhat user friendly. Still it didn't support multiple cards and you had to click around a bit so Book Squire was reworked and it continued on.

    For my latest update to Book Squire I've rewritten it in Clojure. The latest version is much cleaner internally and suspect the maintenance going forward will be easier. The old Python code did suffer overtime as refactoring was never justified enough because it just worked.

  • Matt Fleming: isolcpus is deprecated, kinda

    A problem that a lot of sysadmins and developers have is, how do you run a single task on a CPU without it being interrupted? It’s a common scenario for real-time and virtualised workloads where any interruption to your task could cause unacceptable latency.

    For example, let’s say you’ve got a virtual machine running with 4 vCPUs, and you want to make sure those vCPU tasks don’t get preempted by other tasks since that would introduce delays into your audio transcoding app.

    Running each of those vCPU tasks on its own host CPU seems like the way to go. All you need to do is choose 4 host CPUs and make sure no other tasks run on them.

    How do you do that?

  • GNU Health HMIS 3.6 Release Candidate 1 is out !

    We are pleased to announce the initial release candidate for the upcoming GNU Health HMIS server !

  • rpminspect-0.7 released, bug fixes and a new integration test suite

    rpminspect-0.7 has been released. The main things in this release are a new integration test suite and many bug fixes. There is one new user feature and that's the -t or --threshold option.

    The -t option lets you control the result code that triggers a non-zero exit code from rpminspect. By default, this is set to VERIFY. But you could set it to BAD or INFO or any other valid result code in the program. The result code specified by this option means that any result in rpminspect at that code or higher will trigger a non-zero return code. Combined with the -T option, this can be a useful tool for some types of CI system integration.

More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 brings support for gRPC, custom JNDI names, and Java SE 15 - Red Hat Developer

    Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 now supports gRPC 1.0 and gRPC Client 1.0. This universal, open source framework is an efficient way to connect remote services across data centers. We’ve also added custom names support for the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI), making it easier to look up and inject Jakarta Enterprise Beans (EJBs) in your Open Liberty applications. Finally, this new release is compatible with Java SE 15, the latest Java Standard Edition version. We’ll introduce these features and show you how to set up and configure the new gRPC and custom JNDI names support in Open Liberty 20.0.0.12.

  • Pablo Iranzo Gómez: Upstream/Downstream documentation workflow
  • Updates to Container Tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3

    The launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3, brings with it a host of new container capabilities. This builds on the work done in RHEL 8.2 (New container capabilities in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2) and gives users even more reasons to upgrade from RHEL 7.

  • The rise of the Robot Operating System

    Having your work covered in a documentary like How to Start a Robot Revolution — a five-part documentary in the Open Source Stories series from Red Hat — is bound to make you feel old. You look back and think, "wow, I've been doing this for a long time." Indeed some of us have been working on Robot Operating System (ROS) now for well over a decade, far exceeding the traditional Silicon Valley two-year cycle of jumping to the next thing. Personally, the story in the film is just the latest chapter in an even longer journey. As a computer engineering undergrad at Tulane University in the mid-1990s, I met a new professor in the department named Jim Jennings. Like the other faculty, Jennings had a lab, but unlike them, his lab had robots. There were three RWI B14 robots, and students were welcome to program them. I was immediately hooked by the experience of writing code that made things move in the world.

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – November 2020

    In this 34th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in November 2020.

  • New IBM Redpaper: SUSE and IBM Power Systems for SAP HANA

What Is the Best Linux Distro for Laptops?

Let's start with those aging, venerable machines: your old laptop. Linux carries a strong reputation for breathing life into old hardware, and Lubuntu is one of the best options. Lubuntu, as you might guess from the name, is an Ubuntu derivative. It uses a different desktop environment from Ubuntu, opting for the more lightweight and less resource-intensive LXDE desktop instead of GNOME. The result is a lightweight Linux distro that will run nicely on an older laptop. Lubuntu requires a minimum of 1GB RAM for "advanced internet services" such as YouTube and Facebook, while just 512MB RAM will suffice for basic operations such as LibreOffice and basic web browsing. In terms of CPU, you'll need at least an Intel Pentium 4 or Pentium M, or an AMD K8. Read more

Don't Panic: Kubernetes and Docker

Docker as an underlying runtime is being deprecated in favor of runtimes that use the Container Runtime Interface(CRI) created for Kubernetes. Docker-produced images will continue to work in your cluster with all runtimes, as they always have. If you’re an end-user of Kubernetes, not a whole lot will be changing for you. This doesn’t mean the death of Docker, and it doesn’t mean you can’t, or shouldn’t, use Docker as a development tool anymore. Docker is still a useful tool for building containers, and the images that result from running docker build can still run in your Kubernetes cluster. If you’re using a managed Kubernetes service like GKE or EKS, you will need to make sure your worker nodes are using a supported container runtime before Docker support is removed in a future version of Kubernetes. If you have node customizations you may need to update them based on your environment and runtime requirements. Please work with your service provider to ensure proper upgrade testing and planning. If you’re rolling your own clusters, you will also need to make changes to avoid your clusters breaking. At v1.20, you will get a deprecation warning for Docker. When Docker runtime support is removed in a future release (currently planned for the 1.23 release in late 2021) of Kubernetes it will no longer be supported and you will need to switch to one of the other compliant container runtimes, like containerd or CRI-O. Just make sure that the runtime you choose supports the docker daemon configurations you currently use (e.g. logging). Read more

International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is almost here: Stand with us on Dec. 4

Although many of us are in quarantine, that doesn't mean that we have to cease our fight against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). The International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is just two days away, and we're here to let you know how we can all stand up this Friday, December 4th, against the latest encroachments from one of DRM's major players: Netflix. As pandemic response measures all over the world forced so many people to stay home, we've seen a corresponding and dangerous increase in dependence on streaming media for entertainment. Streaming media has gone from an ethically problematic pastime to being a playground for dystopia. In a world where media is served over ephemeral streaming, these services can delete things from history, or rewrite them, sometimes without any announcement. Besides deciding what people can and can't view with their service, corporations like Netflix also dictate what can and can't be made, now that they're one of the heavyweights in television and film production and distribution. This rise in control is in part due to their constant mistreatment of their subscribers, having used DRM to prevent legitimate uses of their media and dictate which devices can play it. December 4th marks the start of Netflix's "StreamFest" initiative in certain countries -- letting users have a taste of the poison apple before they commit to taking the bite. It's at times like these that we as a community need to step up and say that enough is enough, and let them know that DRM is unacceptable no matter where it appears or how it's being used. We may not be meeting in person, but that doesn't mean we can't come together and let our voices be heard. We hope you'll join us in this year's IDAD by following one or more of the suggestions we've provided below. Read more