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NVIDIA Geforce 7800 GFX

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Hardware

WE SAW A NICE document which reveals that Nvidia is going to call its next chip the Geforce 7800 GFX.

And the graphics chip firm will start using Geforce series seven name for all the cards based on G70, we can reveal.

As for the specs, the Geforce 7800 GFX will be clocked at 430MHz core with 1400MHz memory. It will be equipped with 256MB of 256 bit memory, at least the version we are telling you about will be. It will also feature two DVI's, VIVO and HDTV support.

We are talking about a 24-pipeline card capable of supporting Nvidia intelisample marchitecture 4.0, CineFX 4.0, Ultra shadow marchitecture version two, pure video and 64-bit texture filtering and blending.

We don’t have any idea why you need 64-bit texture filtering nor blending but we guess developers do.

The document wafted under our noses claims double performance over Geforce 6800 Ultra but that might be the case just in some bottleneck scenarios.

We also learned that the card will score more than 7800 marks in 3Dmark05 and will arrive in less then two weeks and counting.

Nvidia briefed its NDA press in San Francisco about it so a lot of detail is out there in the hands of people wearing gags.

Until R520, this will sure be the fastest thing around, that we can confirm. µ

Source.

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