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Servers: IBM/Red Hat, CentOS, CNCF and SUSE

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  • Microservices, and the Observability Macroheadache

    Moving to a microservice architecture, deployed on a cloud platform such as OpenShift, can have significant benefits. However, it does make understanding how your business requests are being executed, across the potentially large numbers of microservices, more challenging.

    If we wish to locate where problems may have occurred in the execution of a business request, whether due to performance issues or errors, we are potentially faced with accessing metrics and logs associated with many services that may have been involved. Metrics can provide a general indication of where problems have occurred, but not specific to individual requests. Logs may provide errors or warnings, but cannot necessarily be correlated to the individual requests of interest.

    Distributed tracing is a technique that has become indispensable in helping users understand how their business transactions execute across a set of collaborating services. A trace instance documents the flow of a business transaction, including interactions between services, internal work units, relevant metadata, latency details and contextualized logging. This information can be used to perform root cause analysis to locate the problem quickly.

  • 5 AI fears and how to address them

    Most people don’t know what microservices architecture is, for example, even if some of the apps they use every day were built in decoupled fashion. But technical evolutions like microservices don’t tend to cause the kinds of emotional responses that AI does around potential social and economic impacts. Nor have microservices haven’t been immortalized in popular culture: No one is lining up at the box office for "Terminator: Rise of the Cloud-Native Apps."

    This speaks mainly to fears about AI’s nebulous future, and it can be tough to evaluate their validity when our imaginations run wild. That’s not particularly useful for IT leaders and other execs trying to build a practical AI strategy today. Yet you will encounter fears – many of them well-founded. The trick is to focus on these real-world concerns, not the time-traveling robot assassins. For starters, they’re much easier to defeat – er, address – because they’re often based in current reality, not futuristic speculation.

    “The types of fears [people have about AI] depend on the type of AI that we are talking about,” says Keiland Cooper, a neuroscience research associate at the University of California Irvine and co-director of ContinualAI. “The more theoretical and far off ‘general AI’ – a computer that can do all the things that humans can do – will raise more fears than those from a more realistic AI algorithm like we see being commonly used today.”

    Let’s look at five legitimate concerns about AI today – and expert advice for addressing them so that they don’t derail your AI plans.

  • CentOS 8 "Gnome Desktop" overview | The community enterprise operating system

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of CentOS 8.0.1905 "Gnome" and some of the applications pre-installed. 

  • How deep does the vDPA rabbit hole go?

    In this post we will be leading you through the different building blocks used for implementing the virtio full HW offloading and the vDPA solutions. This effort is still in progress, thus some bits may change in the future, however the governing building blocks are expected to stay the same. 

    We will be discussing the VFIO, vfio-pci and vhost-vfio all intended on accessing drivers from the userspace both in the guest and the host. We will also be discussing MDEV, vfio-mdev, vhost-mdev and virtio-mdev transport API constructing the vDPA solutions. 

    The post is a technical deep dive and is intended for architects, developers and those who are passionate about understanding how all the pieces fall into place. If you are more interested in understanding the big picture of vDPA, the previous post "Achieving network wirespeed in an open standard manner - introducing vDPA" is strongly recommended instead (we did warn you). 

  • CNCF’s Envoy report card shows Google, Lyft are top of contributing class

    The CNCF has delivered a report card on Envoy, the open source edge and service proxy which is usually mentioned alongside the words Kubernetes or service mesh.

    The report comes a year after Envoy graduated from the CNCF incubation process, and the headline scores are 1,700 contributors, who have made 10,300 code commits, 5,700 pull requests and 51,000 contributions overall.

    Envoy was initially developed in 2016 at Lyft, the ridesharing giant which isn’t Uber, and this is reflected in the CNCF report. Lyft still accounts for 30.4 of the Envoy code, though Google is the biggest contributor overall, with 42.8 per cent of the code.

  • Highly Automated and Secured Multi-Tenancy Using SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    I notice that when it comes to using a XaaS solution, clients and solution architects are typically concerned about multi-tenancy. This post attempts to decipher why that is and how SUSE CaaS Platform helps make this a reality.

More in Tux Machines

4MLinux 30.1 released.

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 4.19.69. The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.41, MariaDB 10.4.7, and PHP 7.3.9 (see this post for more details). You can update your 4MLinux by executing the "zk update" command in your terminal (fully automatic process). Read more

today's howtos

Disney+ streaming uses draconian DRM, avoid

First of all, as always my opinions are my own, not those of my employer. Since I have 2 children I was happy to learn that the Netherlands would be one of the first countries to get Disney+ streaming. So I subscribed for the testing period, problem all devices in my home run Fedora. I started up Firefox and was greeted with an "Error Code 83", next I tried Chrome, same thing. So I mailed the Disney helpdesk about this, explaining how Linux works fine with Netflix, AmazonPrime video and even the web-app from my local cable provider. They promised to get back to me in 24 hours, the eventually got back to me in about a week. They wrote: "We are familiar with Error 83. This often happens if you want to play Disney + via the web browser or certain devices. Our IT department working hard to solve this. In the meantime, I want to advise you to watch Disney + via the app on a phone or tablet. If this error code still occurs in a few days, you can check the help center ..." this was on September 23th. Read more

Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

  • Why Red Hat supports standards and open source

    Red Hat may be synonymous with open source and the developer community, but the company also actively participates within industry standards processes. For example, it is working closely with the operator-led Common NFVi Telco Taskforce (CNTT), which was initiated in the LFN open source community but has now been embraced by the GSMA, as an attempt to harmonise on the many varied NFV infrastructure solutions and architectures. Furthermore, Red Hat supports the move for greater alignment in NFV software platform domain.

  • Overview of Node-RED 1.0 Release

    Low-code, visual-based programming environments are opening doors for new types of application developers. At the same time, new event-driven architectures are making such environments more responsive. Node-RED, a visual flow-based programming tool, is one such environment attuned to these new development styles. After years of refinement, the open source Node-RED recently hit maturity with a 1.0 release. I chatted with Nicholas O’Leary of IBM, who has pioneered the development of Node-RED. In this article, we’ll discover what this new release encompasses. We’ll also peek into the history of Node-RED, look into some fascinating IoT use cases and estimate the future Node-RED roadmap.

  • Girls Who Code wins IBM's first $50K Open Source Community Grant

    Girls Who Code were the winners of the first $50,000 IBM Open Source Community Grant. Girls Who Code is a nonprofit organization working to increase the number of women working in computer science. Girls Who Code helps girls to learn more about computer science through after-school classes and summer courses. Along with the advancement of IT knowledge, women also gain confidence in their capabilities.

  • IBM launches grant to promote diversity in the open source community

    Announced at this week's All Things Open conference in Raleigh, NC, the grant -- which will be awarded quarterly -- will see the winner receive $25k in cash and $25k in Cloud Credits in order to support their efforts dedicated to education and skill building for women, minorities, and/or under-served communities. The inaugural grant is going to Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization working to increase the number of women working in computer science. [...] Other finalists in this quarter's grant competition were Outreachy (Organized by the Software Freedom Conservancy), which sets up three-month paid internships on open source projects for people who ordinarily might not have those opportunities. And PyLadies, an international mentorship group of the Python Software Foundation, helping women become active in the Python open-source community.

  • Ex-IBM Director Joins Open-Source Blockchain Platform

    ennifer Trelewicz, the former Director of the Systems & Technology Laboratory at IBM, has just joined the open-source and fully decentralised blockchain software, Credits. According to AMB Crypto, Trelewicz has taken the post of Chief Business Officer, under which she is responsible for the external business sector of the firm.

  • IBM Group Sales Down Again But Cloud And Open Source Business Is Positive

    Third quarter results at IBM showed group sales were down 3.9% to $18bn, although revenue from the acquired Red Hat was up a handy 20%. That group drop though masked progress being seen in the cloud, with Cloud & Cognitive Software up 7.8% to $5.3bn. This part of the business includes cloud and data platforms that include Red Hat offerings, cognitive applications and transaction processing platforms. The Global Technology Services segment – that includes infrastructure and cloud services and technology support services – was down 4.1% to $6.7bn. And Global Business Services, which includes consulting, application management and global process services was up 2.2% to $4.1bn – with consulting actually up 5% when broken down.

  • IBM Poised for Another Sales Slide Despite Red Hat Deal: What to Watch

    International Business Machines Corp. is expected to report third-quarter earnings after the market closes Wednesday. The results, which follow a string of quarterly revenue declines, will be the company’s first since it closed its $34 billion purchase of open-source software giant Red Hat. Here’s what to look for: