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International Day Against DRM (IDAD) Preparations

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GNU
  • Sign-making party at the FSF office to prepare for IDAD 2019!

    The International Day against DRM(IDAD), organized yearly by the Defective by Design campaign, is promising to be an exciting day of protest against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). This year we are standing up for readers' rights against the restrictive behavior of DRM-encumbered textbooks and digital learning environments from groups like Pearson, and our protestors will collect at the Pearson Education offices in Boston on October 12th, 2019.

    The day's success is dependent on the amount of people showing up, and, of course, on the visuals that we provide to supplement our message. And so, we're inviting you to our sign-making party at 17:30 on October 9th, at the Free Software Foundation (FSF) office in downtown Boston! We will provide a light dinner, art materials, and instructions to make your own protest signs, so all you have to do is join in the fun!

  • International Day Against DRM (IDAD) 2019

    Defective by Design is calling on you to stand up against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) on the International Day Against DRM (IDAD) on October 12th, 2019. This year we will be focusing specifically on everyone's right to read, particularly by urging publishers to free students and educators from the unnecessary and cumbersome restrictions that make their access to necessary course materials far more difficult.

    For thirteen years, we have used IDAD to mobilize actions that stand up for the freedom of users everywhere. This year, we'll be continuing the fight by bringing in a round of in-person actions, guest bloggers, organizing tips, and a few surprises that you won't want to miss. Follow along with us at the Defective by Design Web site, join the DRM Elimination Crew mailing list, and read about our past actions, such as last year's IDAD, and our protest of the W3C's decision to embed DRM into the core framework of the Internet.

Join us in Boston to fight DRM and get crafty! October 9 & 12

  • Join us in Boston to fight DRM and get crafty! October 9 & 12

    The International Day against DRM (IDAD), organized yearly by the Defective by Design campaign, is promising to be an exciting day of protest against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). This year we are standing up for readers' rights against the restrictive behavior of DRM-encumbered textbooks and digital learning environments from groups like Pearson, and our protestors will collect at the Pearson Education offices in Boston on October 12th, 2019.

    The day's success is dependent on the amount of people showing up, and, of course, on the visuals that we provide to supplement our message. And so, we're inviting you to our sign-making party at 17:30 on October 9th, at the Free Software Foundation (FSF) office in downtown Boston! We will provide a light dinner, art materials, and instructions to make your own protest signs, so all you have to do is join in the fun!

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