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Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly, BSD Now, Linux Headlines, Linux in the Ham Shack and TLLTS

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Interviews
  • FLOSS Weekly 549: PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL, also known as Postgres, is a free and open-source relational database management system emphasizing extensibility and technical standards compliance. It is designed to handle a range of workloads, from single machines to data warehouses or Web services with many concurrent users.

  • The TrueNAS Library | BSD Now 318

    DragonFlyBSD vs. FreeBSD vs. Linux benchmark on Ryzen 7, JFK Presidential Library chooses TrueNAS for digital archives, FreeBSD 12.1-beta is available, cool but obscure X11 tools, vBSDcon trip report, Project Trident 12-U7 is available, a couple new Unix artifacts, and more.

  • 10/02/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Nextcloud goes pro, the self-proclaimed "Steam replacement" reaches version 1, and Microsoft drops some far-out future tech.

    Plus Linux app throttling is in the works for Chrome OS.

  • LHS Episode #305: Morning Mink

    Welcome to Episode 305 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts discuss the Amazon being invasive (no, really!), amateur radio in France, Australia and space, artificial intelligence multi-SDR boards and much more. Thank you for listening and we hope you have a great week.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 828

    ubuntu 19.10, 3d printing, streaming, good stuff

More in Tux Machines

May/June in KDE PIM

Following Dan here’s the summary of what happened around KDE PIM in the last two months. While the focus was mainly on the 20.04.x maintenance releases and KDE’s source code hosting and review systems migrated to a Gitlab instance during that time, development continued at full steam with more than 1,800 changes by 34 contributors. Read more More KDE: 20.08 releases branches created

Learn NixOS by turning a Raspberry Pi into a Wireless Router

A lot of the Nix documentation seems to be aimed at a very particular kind of desktop user: someone who already has Nix installed! Such users represent an important use case, and the nix build configurations are easy enough to read. However, I definitely think there is on-boarding improvement work to be done in the Nix ecosystem. So, will I ever go back? I don't think so! This router was so cheap (~$40) and the Raspberry Pi 3B+ is so powerful that I get amazing performance throughout my entire apartment. If it ever breaks, the Pi will be trivial to replace. I am really happy with what I created. Even if this little project isn't original, it solves a real problem in my day-to-day life. In terms of NixOS as a Linux distribution, I think I now am totally on board. Nix has so many incredible advantages that (as a control freak who builds his own WiFi router) I just can't ignore or give up. The feature of Ubuntu that was keeping me on that distribution for so long was that "it just works" © ®. But Nix "just works" too. The only catch is that you need to know what "it" is that you want working ahead of time. I am also comfortable with responsibly using environments, so I think that increases my willingness to jump into a new OS framework. I am a little worried about moving from Ubuntu to Nix on an existing machine, but that is what external hard drive backups are for! Read more

today's howtos

Android Leftovers