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‘Far Cry New Dawn’ Never Released For Linux, But It’s Matching Windows 10 Performance Anyway

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming

The takeaway is clear: same minimum framerates, and an average framerate only 2.6% lower than Windows 10. Effectively within margin of error, and certainly not discernible when we’re talking about 112 FPS versus 115 FPS.

(The eagle-eyed among you may even notice slightly lower frametimes on the Linux side when watching the benchmark video.)

When you step back and realize that Far Cry New Dawn was never intended to run on Linux, yet does so this smoothly, it’s a testament to how far Linux gaming has come.

My own benchmarks – albeit for different titles – back this up. And when games are released natively on Linux, the performance is often better than the Windows 10 counterparts. It’s not a consistent conclusion, but as Codeweavers and Valve continue to refine and improve what they’re doing, the outlook gets brighter and brighter.

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More in Tux Machines

Solaris/UNIX: New Solaris Update/Release, Mystery of Unix History

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Mesa 19.2.5

Hi list,

I'd like to announce mesa 19.2.5. This is a return to our regularly scheduled
release cadence, featuring a reasonable number of fixes. In general things are
slowing down on the 19.2 branch, and things are starting to look pretty nice.

There's a little bit over everything in here, with anv and radeonsi standing out
as the two biggest components getting changes, but core mesa, core gallium,
llvmpipe, nir, egl, i965, tgsi, st/mesa, spirv, and the Intel compiler also
fixes in this release.

Dylan


Shortlog
========

Ben Crocker (1):
      llvmpipe: use ppc64le/ppc64 Large code model for JIT-compiled shaders

Brian Paul (1):
      Call shmget() with permission 0600 instead of 0777

Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
      spirv: Don't leak GS initialization to other stages

Danylo Piliaiev (1):
      i965: Unify CC_STATE and BLEND_STATE atoms on Haswell as a workaround

Dylan Baker (4):
      docs: Add SHA256 sum for for 19.2.4
      cherry-ignore: Update for 19.2.4 cycle
      docs: Add relnotes for 19.2.5
      VERSION: bump for 19.2.5

Eric Engestrom (1):
      egl: fix _EGL_NATIVE_PLATFORM fallback

Ian Romanick (2):
      nir/algebraic: Add the ability to mark a replacement as exact
      nir/algebraic: Mark other comparison exact when removing a == a

Illia Iorin (1):
      mesa/main: Ignore filter state for MS texture completeness

Jason Ekstrand (1):
      anv: Stop bounds-checking pushed UBOs

Lepton Wu (1):
      gallium: dri2: Use index as plane number.

Lionel Landwerlin (3):
      anv: invalidate file descriptor of semaphore sync fd at vkQueueSubmit
      anv: remove list items on batch fini
      anv/wsi: signal the semaphore in the acquireNextImage

Marek Olšák (3):
      st/mesa: fix Sanctuary and Tropics by disabling ARB_gpu_shader5 for them
      tgsi_to_nir: fix masked out image loads
      tgsi_to_nir: handle PIPE_FORMAT_NONE in image opcodes

Paulo Zanoni (1):
      intel/compiler: fix nir_op_{i,u}*32 on ICL

Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (3):
      radeonsi: disable sdma for gfx10
      radeonsi: tell the shader disk cache what IR is used
      radeonsi: fix shader disk cache key


git tag: mesa-19.2.5

Read more Also: Mesa 19.2.5 Released With Intel Vulkan + RadeonSI Driver Fixes

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  • The Incredible Disaster of Python 3

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The 10 Best Geometry Software for Linux System in 2019

Today whatever you consider, be it day to day life, physics, chemistry, architecture, space science, everywhere there is geometry. The invention of the computer has invented critical geometries and quick solutions to solve those. Many software is created to make geometry accessible and easy for everyone. The Linux dominated tech world has also created some excellent software for geometry. Thus, we shall discuss some geometry software for Linux that can fulfill almost all its related issues. Read more