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Servers: "Docker Not Doomed?" and Some IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
Server
  • Docker Not Doomed?

    Modern application development essentially consists of composing an application from a variety of services. These services aren't just infrastructure components that live on a server any more. They're delivered via an API and could be almost anything underneath as the abstractions start to pile up.

    COBOL code at the other end of a message bus with a lambda-function frontend? Okay. Ephemeral container running a Spring Boot service that connects to an RDBMS on a physical Unix server on the other side of the country? Sure, why not? Modern applications don't really care, because it's all about getting the job done. The name of the game is loosely-coupled modular components.

    This is why Docker has joined forces with Microsoft, Bitnami, HashiCorp, and a few others to create the Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB) specification. Docker uses this spec as part of its Docker App tool, which behaves a lot like docker-compose to collect a variety of services together into a single application bundle that can be shared around. It's a lot like a container collection, and brings the same easy portability of containers to composed applications.

    "[Docker App] allows you to describe not just containers, but other services around which the app is dependent," says Johnston. "And it allows you to do things that enterprises care about, such as signing the bundle, verifying that signature, and automatically promoting it based on that signature and things like that."

  • Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh is now available: What you should know

    As Kubernetes and Linux-based infrastructure take hold in digitally transforming organizations, modern applications frequently run in a microservices architecture and therefore can have complex route requests from one service to another. With Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh, we’ve gone beyond routing the requests between services and included tracing and visualization components that make deploying a service mesh more robust. The service mesh layer helps us simplify the connection, observability and ongoing management of every application deployed on Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

    Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh is available through the OpenShift Service Mesh Operator, and we encourage teams to try this out on Red Hat OpenShift 4 here.

  • Catching up with Red Hat at Sibos 2019

    Red Hat is excited to once again be attending Sibos, an annual financial services industry conference exhibition and networking event that is hosted by SWIFT. This year, the event is being held in London, England from September 23rd through 26th. Red Hat will be attending to sponsor a number of activities and discuss how and why enterprise open source technologies offer innovative capabilities that can help firms thrive in their digital journeys.

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