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today's leftovers: LFS, Games, Shows and Government's Use of Containers

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Misc
  • Linux From Scratch (LFS) Stable Version 9.0 Released

    Linux From Scratch (LFS) is a project that provides you with step-by-step instructions for building your own custom Linux system, entirely from source code.

    The Linux From Scratch community announces the release of LFS Version 9.0 on Sep 01, 2019.

    Toolchain updates to glibc-2.30, and gcc-9.2.0 is a major changes in this release.

    In total, 33 packages were updated since the last release.

  • Growing Pains, a platformer where you're constantly growing is now on Linux

    Growing Pains, a platformer where you're growing constantly as you rush to finish each level before getting stuck is now available on Linux.

    Originally released on Steam by Smudged Cat Games back in 2014, they didn't actually have any plan to bring it to Linux. However, game porter Ethan Lee recently updated two other Smudged Cat Games titles (Adventures of Shuggy and Gateways) and they announced on Twitter that they ported Growing Pains "just because"—okay then!

  • The non-linear hack-n-slash platformer Blasphemous is still coming to Linux but it's delayed

    After successfully crowdfunding on Kickstarter back in 2017, Blasphemous is now out but sadly the Linux version is currently delayed.

    There seemed to be no mention of this before, which likely would have been quite frustrating if you were a Kickstarter backer. Speaking about it when queried on Steam, the publisher Team 17 said it is coming but they have no current date for when that will happen. The developer, The Game Kitchen, have also today put out a Kickstarter update post to mention "Due to circumstances out of our control, Mac and Linux are not going to be publicly available at launch, but they will be really soon.".

  • SMLR 314 Let’s Talk About Pie

    Tony Bemus, Tom Lawrence, Phil Porada and Jay LaCroix Sound bites by Mike Tanner

  • LHS Episode #301: Pi-Star Deep Dive Part 1

    Welcome to Episode 301 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts have an in-depth talk with Andy Taylor, MW0MWZ, the author and maintainer of the Pi-Star project. Pi-Star is a Linux operating system and application suite for single-board computers which creates a hotspot for digital VHF and UHF operation. We quickly discover this topic requires more than one deep dive so this will be the first in a series on Pi-Star and digital operation. 

  • Best Practices for Using Container Technology in Government

    Far from a passing fad, containers are a logical outgrowth of the huge success of virtualization and can help to solve a wide range of operational problems, including deployment, scalability and patching.

    Government IT managers with a broad portfolio of existing applications should explore how to take advantage of the benefits of container technology. When moving from one computing environment to another, applications may not always run as programmed. But containers collect code and all related dependencies into one virtual package so that an application runs smoothly wherever it’s deployed, from one cloud to another.

    Here are some best practices for optimizing container use to achieve quick wins in your environment.

More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware and Google's Linux-powered Platforms

  • RISC-V: What’s Missing And Who’s Competing

    Arm is definitely one of the competitors. RISC-V is definitely getting a lot of traction in the microcontroller space, and even Arm is trying to make it easier for other companies to adopt that adopt their baseline designs. Arm and ARC are definitely competitors, especially in the IoT embedded space.

  • AMD Launches Chromebook-Optimized Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series Mobile Processors

    After unveiling Athlon 3000-series of 15W mobile processors earlier this year, AMD has now announced Chromebook-optimized mobile processors with AMD Ryzen and Athlon 3000 C-Series family.

  • Android 11 on Android TV Launches for the Big Screen

    Android 11 may have been released for smartphones on September 8th, but Google has just only announced the launch of Android 11 on Android TV for an optimized experience on the big screen. The version of the TV-optimized operating system builds on the many new features introduced for Android 11, but also adds performance and privacy improvements, new features tailored for the TV, and updated developer tools.

Games: Wine, Stadia, Move or Die

  • Easier Vulkan Debugging Of Windows Applications Running Under Wine Is On The Way

    With patches pending it will be easier to debug Windows games/applications running under Wine on Linux. Stemming from a discussion over the ability to forward Vulkan API debugging information to the host loader to receive those calls from the Windows software, there are now Wine patches sent out to make that happen.

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  • The Division 2 on Stadia gets a free weekend for Stadia Pro and more Stadia news

    Seems Google are getting a bit more chatty about Stadia recently. Hot on the heels of announcing another round of new indie games with Stadia Makers, we have another round-up for you. For anyone with Stadia Pro, which is still free for a month when you sign up, you will able to play The Division 2 free from September 24 at 16:00 UTC until September 28 at 16:00 UTC. I actually think The Division 2 is one of the better ports on Stadia, with cross-play with the Windows version and it actually looks quite good.

  • Move or Die hits 1 million sales, free to play until September 24 and huge discount

    Move or Die, probably one of the funniest party games around that supports both local and online play has a hit a huge milestone with 1 million sales. That sales mark is just on Steam, which sounds like a lot but this is spread across quite a few years since it released back in 2016. Fantastic for an indie developer though, and well deserved because it's a genuine delight to play through. Move or Die is an absurdly fast-paced, 4-player local and online party game where the mechanics change every 20 seconds.

today's howtos

Allan Day: GNOME Shell user research goings on

It’s been a while since we last blogged about the GNOME Shell design work that’s been happening. While we might not have blogged in a bit, there’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, particularly on the research side, and it’s about time that we told everyone about what we’ve been up to. As a side note: a great team has developed around this initiative. The existing design team of Jakub, Tobias and myself has been joined by Maria Komarova from System76. Maria has a particularly strong research background and was immensely helpful in running interviews. The development side has also been fully engaged with the process, particularly through Georges and Florian. Read more