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A question about the letter "L"

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The lowercase "l" that is. So it's kinda goofy, but hear me out.

Some distros, when you start in "verbose" mode, display a lowercase "l" with a bar across the bottom. (Which can't really be demonstrated when viewing with a sans-serif font, but think of what it looks like when using a manual typewriter. You do remember manual typewriters, don't you? No? OK, think of what it looks like in Courier. Or see this screenshot.)

Other distros display a lowercase "l" with a curly tail, like the bottom of the letter "t" -- for example, in this screenshot.

The question is, why the difference? And where do console fonts come from, anyway?

--
Bonus goofy joke: "Why does the alphabet only have 25 letters at Christmas?" "Noel."

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