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GNOME Shell 3.33.92

Filed under
GNOME

About GNOME Shell
=================

GNOME Shell provides core user interface functions for the GNOME 3
desktop, like switching to windows and launching applications. GNOME
Shell takes advantage of the capabilities of modern graphics hardware
and introduces innovative user interface concepts to provide a
visually attractive and easy to use experience.

Tarball releases are provided largely for distributions to build
packages. If you are interested in building GNOME Shell from source,
we would recommend building from version control using the build
script described at:

 https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/GnomeShell

Not only will that give you the very latest version of this rapidly
changing project, it will be much easier than get GNOME Shell and its
dependencies to build from tarballs.

News
====

* Animate pointer a11y pie timer [Jonas D.; !688]
* Fix restarting shell in systemd user session [Benjamin; !690]
* Misc. bug fixes and cleanups [Florian, Jonas D., Jonas Å., Will;
  !691, !689, !692, #1552, !698]

Contributors:
  Jonas Ådahl, Benjamin Berg, Piotr Drąg, Jonas Dreßler, Florian Müllner,
  Will Thompson

Translators:
  Daniel Șerbănescu [ro], Danial Behzadi [fa], Daniel Mustieles [es],
  Jiri Grönroos [fi], Asier Sarasua Garmendia [eu], Piotr Drąg [pl],
  Rūdolfs Mazurs [lv], Anders Jonsson [sv], Fran Dieguez [gl], Jordi Mas [ca],
  Matej Urbančič [sl], Zander Brown [en_GB], Ryuta Fujii [ja], Tim Sabsch [de],
  Fabio Tomat [fur], Pawan Chitrakar [ne], A S Alam [pa], Changwoo Ryu [ko],
  Aurimas Černius [lt], Daniel Rusek [cs], Marek Černocký [cs],
  Kukuh Syafaat [id], Goran Vidović [hr], Rafael Fontenelle [pt_BR]

Read more

Also: Mutter 3.33.92

Last Minute Shell & Mutter Changes Ready For Testing Ahead Of GNOME 3.34

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Security Leftovers

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  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 161 - Human nature and ad powered open source

    Josh and Kurt start out discussing human nature and how it affects how we view security. A lot of things that look easy are actually really hard. We also talk about the npm library Standard showing command line ads. Are ads part of the future of open source?

  • Skidmap malware drops LKMs on Linux machines to enable cryptojacking, backdoor access

    Researchers have discovered a sophisticated cryptomining program that uses loadable kernel modules (LKMs) to help infiltrate Linux machines, and hides its malicious activity by displaying fake network traffic stats. Dubbed Skidmap, the malware can also grant attackers backdoor access to affected systems by setting up a secret master password that offers access to any user account in the system, according to Trend Micro threat analysts Augusto Remillano II and Jakub Urbanec in a company blog post today. “Skidmap uses fairly advanced methods to ensure that it and its components remain undetected. For instance, its use of LKM rootkits – given their capability to overwrite or modify parts of the kernel – makes it harder to clean compared to other malware,” the blog post states. “In addition, Skidmap has multiple ways to access affected machines, which allow it to reinfect systems that have been restored or cleaned up.”

  • Skidmap Linux Malware Uses Rootkit Capabilities to Hide Cryptocurrency-Mining Payload

    Cryptocurrency-mining malware is still a prevalent threat, as illustrated by our detections of this threat in the first half of 2019. Cybercriminals, too, increasingly explored new platforms and ways to further cash in on their malware — from mobile devices and Unix and Unix-like systems to servers and cloud environments. They also constantly hone their malware’s resilience against detection. Some, for instance, bundle their malware with a watchdog component that ensures that the illicit cryptocurrency mining activities persist in the infected machine, while others, affecting Linux-based systems, utilize an LD_PRELOAD-based userland rootkit to make their components undetectable by system monitoring tools.

Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts. Read more

Software: Zotero, PulseCaster and Qt Port of SFXR

  • Zotero and LibreOffice

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  • PulseCaster 0.9 released!

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  • SFXR Qt 1.3.0

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today's howtos