Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Commons Clause in open source licences: business necessity or betrayal of software freedom?

    Accommodation of new business models and technological advances has fundamentally disrupted the open source industry. Unlike on-prem solutions, which are installed in a user environment, cloud-based software remains hosted on the vendor's servers and is accessed by users through a web browser. Because cloud-based offerings do not involve software distribution, the copyleft effect of open source licences is not triggered.

    Large cloud providers use their market power and infrastructure to generate significant revenues by offering proprietary services around successful open source projects, thus depriving such projects of an opportunity to commercialise similar services.

    [...]

    Whether the benefits of employing the Commons Clause outweigh the potential risks is likely to invoke a case by case analysis. The community consensus on the four software freedoms [the freedom to run the program for any purpose, the freedom to modify it for private or public use, the freedom to make copies and distribute the program and its derivatives] is under continuous pressure for modification. Indeed reshaping the portfolio of freedoms may not necessarily be a threat to open source as we know it, but rather an evolution thereof.

    As Heather Meeker, the drafter of the Commons Clause, has noted, the choice is often between the full proprietary route and a source-available licensing. By choosing the latter, we may preserve at least some of the freedoms.

  • Fedora 30 : About the Jupyter lab tool.

    The tutorial for today is about Jupiter Lab and Fedora 30. You can see an old tutorial with Fedora 29 here.
    The JupyterLab is the next-generation web-based user interface for Project Jupyter.
    This can be installed using conda, pip or pipenv.

  • AWS celebrates Labor Day weekend by roasting customer data in US-East-1 BBQ

    A power outage fried hardware within one of Amazon Web Services' data centers during America's Labor Day weekend, causing some customer data to be lost.

    When the power went out, and backup generators subsequently failed, some virtual server instances evaporated – and some cloud-hosted volumes were destroyed and had to be restored from backups, where possible, we're told.

    A Register reader today tipped us off that on Saturday morning, Amazon's cloud biz started suffering a breakdown within its US-East-1 region.

    Our tipster told us they had more than 1TB of data in Amazon's cloud-hosted Elastic Block Store (EBS), which disappeared during the outage: they were told "the underlying hardware related to your EBS volume has failed, and the data associated with the volume is unrecoverable."

    [...]

    Unlucky customers who had data on the zapped storage systems were told by AWS staff that, despite attempts to revive the missing bits and bytes, some of the ones and zeroes were permanently scrambled: "A small number of volumes were hosted on hardware which was adversely affected by the loss of power. However, due to the damage from the power event, the EBS servers underlying these volumes have not recovered.

More in Tux Machines

10 Open Source Static Site Generators to Create Fast and Resource-Friendly Websites

Technically, a static website means the webpages are not generated on the server dynamically. The HTML, CSS, JavaScript lie on the server in the version the end user receives it. The raw source code files are already prebuilt, the source code doesn’t change with the next server request. It’s FOSS is a dynamic website which depends on several databases and the web pages are generated and served when there’s a request from your browser. Majority of the web is powered by dynamic sites where you interact with the websites and there are plenty of content that often change. Read more

Today in Techrights

Richard Stallman: You can get arrested without a reason

The last few months have put data protection back in the spotlight. During a crisis of this kind, do we have to choose between safety and privacy? We talked about this with Richard Stallman, digital privacy activist and the founder of the Free Software Movement. Read more

7 Amazing Linux Distributions For Kids

Linux is a very powerful operating system and that is one of the reasons why it powers a lot of servers on the Internet. Though there have been concerns about its user-friendliness which has brought about the debate of how it will overtake Mac OSX and Windows on desktop computers, I think users need to accept Linux as it is to realize its real power. Today, Linux powers a lot of machines out there, from mobile phones to tablets, laptops, workstations, servers, supercomputers, cars, air traffic control systems, refrigerators, and many more. With all this and more yet to come in the near future, as I had already stated at the beginning, Linux is the operating system for future computing. Because the future belongs to the kids of today, then introducing them to technologies that will change the future is the way to go. Therefore they have to be introduced at an early stage to start learning computer technologies and Linux as a special case. One thing common to children is curiosity and early learning can help instill a character of exploration in them when the learning environment is designed to suit them. Having looked at some quick reasons why kids should learn Linux, let us now go through a list of exciting Linux distributions that you can introduce your kids to so that they can start using and learning Linux. Read more