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Events: GUADEC 2019 and Linux Plumbers Conference

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GNOME
  • Robert Ancell: GUADEC 2019 - Thessaloniki

    This year we had seven people from Canonical Ubuntu desktop team in attendance. Many other companies and projects had representatives (including Collabora, Elementary OS, Endless, Igalia, Purism, RedHat, SUSE and System76). I think this was the most positive GUADEC I've attended, with people from all these organizations actively leading discussions and a general consideration of each other as we try and maximise where we can collaborate. 

    Of course, the community is much bigger than a group of companies. In particular is was great to meet Carlo and Frederik from the Yaru theme project. They've been doing amazing work on a new theme for Ubuntu and it will be great to see it land in a future release.

    In the annual report there was a nice surprise; I made the most merge requests this year! I think this is a reflection on the step change in productivity in GNOME since switching to GitLab. So now I have a challenge to maintain that for next year...

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: LPC waiting list closed; just a few days until the conference

    The waiting list for this year’s Linux Plumbers Conference is now closed. All of the spots available have been allocated, so anyone who is not registered at this point will have to wait for next year. There will be no on-site registration. We regret that we could not accommodate everyone. The good news is that all of the microconferences, refereed talks, Kernel summit track, and Networking track will be recorded on video and made available as soon as possible after the conference. Anyone who could not make it to Lisbon this year will at least be able to catch up with what went on. Hopefully those who wanted to come will make it to a future LPC.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference waiting list closed; just a few days until the conference

    The Linux Plumbers Conference has filled up and has closed its waiting list.

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