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Server: Cilium, Unix at 50, SUSE and HPC

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Server
  • Thomas Graf on Cilium, the 1.6 Release, eBPF Security, & the Road Ahead

    Cilium is open source software for transparently securing the network connectivity between application services deployed using Linux container management platforms like Docker and Kubernetes. It is a CNI plugin that offers layer 7 features typically seen with a service mesh. On this week’s podcast, Thomas Graf (one of the maintainers of Cilium and co-founder of Isovalent) discusses the recent 1.6 release, some of the security questions/concerns around eBPF, and the future roadmap for the project.

  • Unix at 50 : The OS that powered smartphones started from failure

    UNIX was born 50 years ago from the failure of an ambitious project that involved titans like Bell Labs, GE, and MIT. This OS powers nearly all smartphones sold worldwide. The story of UNIX began from a meeting on the top floor of an unremarkable annex at the Bell Labs complex in Murray Hills, New Jersey.

  • We offer enterprise-grade open source solutions from edge to core to cloud: Brent Schroeder, Global CTO, SUSE

    The open source market is taking an interesting turn of its own. With IBM acquiring Red Hat for $34 billion, the wheels of competition and innovation have truly been set into motion in the open source market.

    In such interesting times, Brent Schroeder, Global CTO, SUSE took over from Thomas Di Giacomo, the now president for engineering at the company. In an exclusive interview with ETCIO, Schroeder talks about how SUSE intends to power digital transformation for companies to innovate and compete.

  • Julita Inca: Building a foundation of HPC knowledge

    The curriculum for courses are previously arranged in advance by the teachers and teaching assistants and published one week before on the intranet. They consist of the theorical materials and practical exercises to support the theory. Some reinforcing workshops were also used in order to address questions and concerns.

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