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What'll they think of next: Winbuntu?

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu development team announced today that it is looking for testers for a new, Windows-based installer for its popular Linux distribution. The idea is to provide a simple-to-use, no-risk way to install Ubuntu in a partition on a Windows machine.

"The aim of this installer is to provide an easier way for a Windows user to install Ubuntu without having to know how to burn a cd iso, set the bios to boot from cd, repartition the disks, set up a multiboot system, etc." the team said in the announcement on Ubuntuforums.org. "It will not replace any of the current Ubuntu installation options, and will not require that Windows is installed prior to the installation of Ubuntu."

More Here.

Sounds a lot like Topologilinux

In years past, Linux bootloaders gave me a lot of headaches. One computer hung when loading LILO. The next computer could use LILO, but hung with GRUB. Getting MBRs fixed is a pain, and kind of scary. (Backup? What's a backup?) So it took a while before I was brave enough to install GRUB on the next computer.

Fortunately, there was Topologilinux, which uses "GRUB for Windows" (which loads from an entry in Windows' boot.ini) and runs in a couple of loopback images from an NTFS partition. It's been around for a while and is a great way for the faint-hearted to try out Linux with low risk.

And, after that, you can start experimenting with "real" Linux installations.

I just want to point out...

I predicted this was going to happen.

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Ubuntu is lame as a duck- not the metaphorical lame duck, but more like a real duck that hurt its leg, maybe by stepping on a land mine.

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