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today's leftovers

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  • Voyager Live 10 overview | The spirit of open source in the heart of the digital world

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Voyager Live 10 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Cantor and the support for Jupyter notebooks at the finish line

    Hello everyone! It's been almost three weeks since my last post and this is going to be my my final post in this blog. So, I want to summarize all my work done in this GSoC project. Just to remember again, the goal of the project was to add the support for Jupiter notebooks to Cantor. This format is widely used in the scientific and education areas, mostly by the application Jupyter, and there is a lot of content available on the internet in this format (for example, here). By adding the support of this format in Cantor we’ll allow Cantor users access this content. This is short description, if you more intersted, you can found more details in my proporsal.

    [...]

    This is all for the limitations, I think. Let's talk about future plans and perspectives. In my opinion, this project has reached its initial goals, is finished now and will only need maintenance and support in terms of bug fixing and adjustment to potential format changes in future.

    When talking more generally, this project is part of the current overall development activities in Cantor to improve the usability and the stability of the application and to extend the feature set in order to enable more workflows and to reach to a bigger audience with this. See 19.08 and 18.12 release announcements to read more about the developments in the recent releases of Cantor. Support of the Jupyter notebook format is a big step into this direction but this not all. We have already many other items in our backlog like for the UX improvements, plots integration improvements going into this direction. Some of this items will be addressed soon. Some of them are something for the next GSoC project next year maybe?

    I think, that's all for now. Thank you for reading this blog and thank you for your interest in my project. Working on this project was a very interesting and pleasant period of my life. I am happy that I had this opportunity and was able to contribute to KDE and especially to Cantor with the support of my mentor Alexander Semke.

  • My Open-Source Activities from January to August 2019

    Debian is a general-purpose Linux distribution that is widely used on the planet. I am a Debian Developer who works on packages related to Android SDK and the Java ecosystem.

    I started a new package in an attempt to build the Android framework android.jar using the upstream build systems involving Ninja, Soong and others. Since the beginning we have been writing our own (very simple) makefiles to build the binaries in AOSP because their build logic tends to be simple and straightforward, until we worked on android.jar. Building it requires digging in so much code that it became incredibly hard to maintain, which is why we still haven’t brought in any newer version since android-framework-23. This is problematic as developers can’t build any apps that target Android 7+.

    After a month of work, this package is finally done. After all its dependencies are packaged in the future, it will be good to upload. This is where the students of Google Summer of Code (GSoC) come in!

  • iMars Black is an Inexpensive Bluetooth 5.0 USB Audio Transmitter & Receiver
  • This Linux computer plus router is the size of a ring box

    The VoCore2 Mini Linux Computer packs a wireless router and 16M of onboard storage into a cube about the size of a coin. Just hook it up to any display monitor through a standard USB2.0 port, and you're ready to put it to work. With 128MB of DDR2 memory and an MT7628AN MIPS processor, it's equally useful as a streaming station, VPN gateway, data storage - you name it.

  • Dive into the life and legacy of Alan Turing: 5 books and more

    Another well-known fact about Turing was his conviction for "gross indecency" because of his homosexuality, and the posthumous apology and pardon issued over more a half a decade after Turing’s death.

    But beyond all of this, who was Alan Turing?

    Here are six books that delve deeply into the life and legacy of Alan Turing. Collectively, these books cover his life, both professional and personal, and work others have done to build upon Turing’s ideas. Individually, or collectively, these works allow the reader to learn who Alan Turing was beyond just a few well-known, broad-stroke themes.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (cups, nginx, and openjdk-7), Fedora (httpd, mod_md, nghttp2, and patch), and SUSE (rubygem-loofah).

  • Epyc Encryption | TechSNAP 410

    It's CPU release season and we get excited about AMD's new line of server chips. Plus our take on AMD's approach to memory encryption, and our struggle to make sense of Intel's Comet Lake line.

    Also, a few Windows worms you should know about, the end of the road for EV certs, and an embarrassing new Bluetooth attack.

More in Tux Machines

Debian: CUPS, LTS and Archival

  • Praise Be CUPS Driverless Printing

    Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work's many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet. Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few 'thank you' emails per month. I'm very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Archiving 20 years of online content

    mailman2 is pretty great. You can get a dump of an email list pretty easily and mailman3's web frontend, the lovely hyperkitty, is well, lovely. Importing a legacy mailman2 mbox went without a hitch thanks to the awesome hyperkitty_import importer. Kudos to the Debian Mailman Team for packaging this in Debian for us. But what about cramming a Yahoo! Group mailing list in hyperkitty? I wouldn't recommend it. After way too many hours spent battling character encoding errors I just decided people that wanted to read obscure emails from 2003 would have to deal with broken accents and shit. But hey, it kinda works! Oh, and yes, archiving a Yahoo! Group with an old borken Perl script wasn't an easy task. Hell, I kept getting blacklisted by Yahoo! for scraping too much data to their liking. I ended up patching together the results of multiple runs over a few weeks to get the full mbox and attachments. By the way, if anyone knows how to tell hyperkitty to stop at a certain year (i.e. not display links for 2019 when the list stopped in 2006), please ping me.

Running The AMD "ABBA" Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

Last week AMD's AGESA "ABBA" update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I've been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor. The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively. Read more

Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

  • Linux 5.2.16
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel. All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.74
  • Linux 4.14.145

Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams. However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts. Read more