Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Looking Glass meets Mandriva

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

Looking Glass is an open source development project based on and evolved from Sun Microsystems' Advanced Development division. It supports running unmodified existing applications in a 3D space, as well as APIs for 3D window manager and application development. At the moment, existing application integration is supported for Linux and Solaris x86 platforms. The platform for 3D application development is available for Linux, Solaris and Windows platforms. Linux-Tip.net was testing the LG3D Mega-bundle which integrates all the software necessary to run lg3d. This includes the jdk, java3d and lg3d itself.

Step 1: Download and install the Mega-Bundle
The LG3D Mega-bundle Installer installs LG3D and all the necessary components including JRE and Java 3D. Download it here:

https://lg3d-core.dev.java.net/files/documents/1834/46210/lg3d--1-0-0-linux-i686-0612190943.bin

Store it in your home directory (/home/users Downloads). The LG3D developer recommend to install it into /usr/share directory. Let’s do this after getting root permissions:

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017