Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Google's Chrome OS 76 Improves Support for Multiple Accounts on Chromebooks

    Google promoted the Chrome OS 76 operating system for supported Chromebook devices to the stable channel, and it is now rolling out to users from around the world with new features and improvements.
    Based on the latest Google Chrome 76 web browser release, which brings many new features and improvements on its own, Chrome OS 76's probably most exciting is a unified account management for those who use multiple Google accounts on their Chromebook, either by you or if the devices is shared with other people.

    Users can check out the new account management feature under Settings > Google Accounts, and they should keep in mind that they can now apply all the permissions and access granted to apps, add-ons, websites, Google Play, and in Chrome to all of their signed-in Google accounts.

    [...]

    Chrome OS 76 is now rolling out to all supported Chromebook devices. You can update your Chromebook to Chrome OS 76 by going to Chrome settings and accessing the About Chrome OS section. The new version will be automatically downloaded and installed on your Chromebook. A restart is required for Chrome OS 76 to be successfully installed.

  • Netrunner 19.08 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Netrunner 19.08.

  • Asterisk Celebrates 25 Million Downloads

    Sangoma Technologies Corporation (TSX VENTURE: STC), a trusted leader in delivering Unified Communications solutions for SMBs, Enterprises, OEMs, and Service Providers, both on-premises and in the cloud, today announced that September will mark the 25 millionth download of Asterisk, the world's most widely used open source communications software.

  • Mozilla Mornings on the future of EU content regulation

    On 10 September, Mozilla will host the next installment of our EU Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments.

    The next installment will focus on the future of EU content regulation. We’re bringing together a high-level panel to discuss how the European Commission should approach the mooted Digital Services Act, and to lay out a vision for a sustainable and rights-protective content regulation framework in Europe.

  • FreeIPMI 1.6.4 Released

    o In libfreeipmi, add additional workarounds for packets that are
    re-ordered during sensor bridging.
    o In libfreeipmi, add additional sensor / event interpretations.
    o In libfreeipmi, fix error return value on bridging requests.
    o Add workaround in ipmi-sel for QuantaPlex T42D-2U motherboard,
    whichlists a SDR record that makes no sense.
    o Add workaround for Dell Poweredge FC830, which have an error
    when reading the last SDR record on a motherboard.
    o Support Supermicro X10 OEM dimm events.

  • The world’s first mobile phone type crypto digital currency hardware cold wallet officially opened source code

    Recently, the world's first mobile phone type crypto digital asset hardware cold wallet SAFEGEM officially opened source code [...] The cryptography-based blockchain technology is characterized by openness, transparency, and traceability. As an crypto digital asset management system based on blockchain applications, it should have the same characteristics and should have higher security. Therefore, the SAFEGEM development team decided to open up all source code, open source follows the GPL agreement, defines the business boundary, uses open source code for commercial use, and chooses not to open source.

  • Western Digital's Long Trip from Open Standards to Open Source Chips

    It started as a microprocessor pioneer in the 1970s. Now, the company is charting a new course in open source silicon.

  • Excellent Free Books to Learn Go

    Go is a compiled, statically typed programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software. It’s a general purpose programming language with modern features, clean syntax and a robust well-documented common library, making it a good candidate to learn as your first programming language. While it borrows ideas from other languages such as Algol and C, it has a very different character. It’s sometimes described as a simple language.

    Go is an open source project developed by a team at Google and many contributors from the open source community. Go’s first release was in 2009, and it’s distributed under a BSD-style license.

    This article selects the best open source books that will give readers a firm foundation in developing Go applications.

  • Corner cases and exception types

    Some unanticipated corner cases with Python's new "walrus" operator—described in our Python 3.8 overview—have cropped up recently. The problematic uses of the operator will be turned into errors before the final release, but just what exception should be raised came into question. It seems that the exception specified in the PEP for the operator may not really be the best choice, as a recent discussion hashed out.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp now used by 1750 CRAN packages

    Since this morning, Rcpp stands at just over 1750 reverse-dependencies on CRAN. The graph on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo, but excluding Suggests) over time.

    Rcpp was first released in November 2008. It probably cleared 50 packages around three years later in December 2011, 100 packages in January 2013, 200 packages in April 2014, and 300 packages in November 2014. It passed 400 packages in June 2015 (when I tweeted about it), 500 packages in late October 2015, 600 packages in March 2016, 700 packages last July 2016, 800 packages last October 2016, 900 packages early January 2017,
    1000 packages in April 2017, 1250 packages in November 2017, and 1500 packages in November 2018. The chart extends to the very beginning via manually compiled data from CRANberries and checked with crandb. The next part uses manually saved entries. The core (and by far largest) part of the data set was generated semi-automatically via a short script appending updates to a small file-based backend. A list of packages using Rcpp is availble too.

    Also displayed in the graph is the relative proportion of CRAN packages using Rcpp. The four per-cent hurdle was cleared just before useR! 2014 where I showed a similar graph (as two distinct graphs) in my invited talk. We passed five percent in December of 2014, six percent July of 2015, seven percent just before Christmas 2015, eight percent last summer, nine percent mid-December 2016, cracked ten percent in the summer of 2017 and eleven percent in 2018. We are currently at 11.83 percent: a little over one in nine packages. There is more detail in the chart: how CRAN seems to be pushing back more and removing more aggressively (which my CRANberries tracks but not in as much detail as it could), how the growth of Rcpp seems to be slowing somewhat outright and even more so as a proportion of CRAN – just like one would expect a growth curve to.

  • GSoC final report

    The idea of this GSoC project was to implement new Domain-Specific language for LibreOffice to be used in UI testing by logging the user interactions with LO applications then generate the python code needed for the python UI framework which asaswill make testing easier. Also, the project aims to improve the logger that logs all the user interaction to be logged in the new DSL syntax to be more readable. Then we can use this replaying all the user interactions as a UI test.

  • Day 88 [Ed: Karina Passos on her time in KDE GSoC]

    Today, I’ll talk about my GSoC experience and won’t focus so much on Khipu, even because i still have some things to do, so in the next days I’ll publish a post about Khipu and what I’ve done.

    As I said in the old posts, the begin was the most complicated part for me. I made a project thinking that I’d be able to complete, I started studying the code and the things I’d make many weeks before the start. But I couldn’t understand the code and I think it’s my fault. I even lost three weeks after the start stuck in this situation. It was hard for me, because I was really scared about failing and at the same time dealing with my college stuff, because in Brazil, our summer (and our summer vacation), is in December-February, in July we have a three week vacation, but GSoC lasts three months. I wasn’t having a good time at college as well, but with the help of my therapist and my mentors I found a way to deal with the both things and as everything went well.

    After this complicated start, to not fail, my mentor suggested that I could change my project. My initial project was to create new features to Khipu and Analitza (Khipu’s main library) to make it a better application and move it out from beta. Then, my new project was to refactor Khipu (using C++ and QML). I was scared because I didn’t know if I’d be able to complete it, but the simplicity of QML helped me a lot, and before the first evaluation (approx. two weeks after I decided my new project) I finished the interface, or at least most of it.

    [...]

    And, of course, I’d like to say to KDE, Google and my mentors: thanks for this opportunity.

  • How To Check Your IP Address in Ubuntu [Beginner’s Tip]
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 Milestone 2 Released, OpenBenchmarking.org Serves 42 Millionth Download

    The second development release of the forthcoming Phoronix Test Suite 9.0-Asker is now available for testing.

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.0 Milestone 2 continued evolving the brand new result viewer being introduced with PTS 9.0 and various new graphing visualizations. Various fixes and other improvements have landed into this new release. Screenshots and more details on the new result viewing experience soon.

More in Tux Machines

Deepin Desktop Review: A Stylish Distro and Desktop Environment

In this Linux Desktop Environment review, we have a slightly controversial choice. Deepin, both as a distribution and as a Desktop Environment, is one that not everybody feels comfortable using and trusting. However, we’ll be setting that aside, dispelling some myths, and looking at the beautiful Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE), its user experience, some notable features, and giving some recommendations on where to experience it and who should use it. Read more

The 10 Best Raspberry Pi Emulators Available in 2020

Raspberry Pi is a mini-computer as well as a marker board that comes with all the hardware built-in and is designed to make coding easier. You will find everything necessary, including RAM, CPU, and GPU on the boards. However, no matter how perfect Raspberry Pi looks, it isn’t capable of doing a lot of things, including running x86 apps. As a result, we need the Raspberry pi emulators to help us with the problems. One of the most amazing uses of these emulators is to play any of your favorite classic retro games using them on your Pi board. Read more

The 10 Best GNOME based Linux Distributions in 2020

GNOME, short for GNU Network Object Model Environment, was released back in 1999 as a part of the GNU Project. However, throughout its development, the acronym was dropped as it no longer resonated with the evolving GNOME vision. At the time of writing, GNOME 3 is its latest iteration and is currently one of the most popular desktop environment used by almost every major Linux distro. It offers a modern desktop focused on delivering an intuitive user experience for all users – programmers and non-programmers alike. In terms of functionality, new features and options are regularly getting added to GNOME with every point release. Right now, GNOME 3.38 just came out. You can check out its unique features over here. Read more

Games: Breakpoint, Last Stand and Unrailed!

  • Breakpoint is an arcade high-score seekers dream and it's ridiculously fun

    Breakpoint released today and it's an absolute joy. I don't need to bury the lead on this one, as I just want to tell you how freaking-awesome it is. What do you get when you take a bright neon twin-stick shooter, where the shooting has been taken away from you and replaced with exploding melee weapons? A whole lot of action and insane amount of fun that's what. I get a big smile on my face each time I load it up, as it's just genuine easy-going entertainment. Even the intro was brilliantly done, as it's both a tiny tutorial and a logo screen as you smash things and get shown the logos. Excellent touch.

  • The Last Stand update for Left 4 Dead 2 is out, plus big sale and free weekend

    The day no doubt many of our readers have been waiting for is here, as Valve worked with the community to create a brand new update to Left 4 Dead 2 named The Last Stand. Made in partnership with over 30 members of the modding community, it's been a long time since Valve came back to Left 4 Dead 2 in any sizeable way which is why it's so exciting. What exactly does it include? A lot. Seriously, there's loads. Some highlights include: The Last Stand Campaign and over 20 survival maps, new melee weapons, new animations, new voice lines and so much more. [...] The player count is already spiking up dramatically compared to the usual amounts. Looking on SteamDB, it took all of 15 minutes to jump another 15,000+ players on top of around that amount already online. Considering it's one of Valve's most popular games, it's not exactly surprising. This new update might even keep those counts up for some time.

  • Unrailed! is a brilliant and often incredibly frantic co-op game - out now

    Unrailed! from Indoor Astronaut and Daedalic Entertainment has now left Early Access as a finished and highly entertaining co-op experience all about keeping a train going as long as you can. Chop trees, mine for iron and get building. Simple mechanics but it quickly becomes absolute chaos. As you progress and stop at each station for a quick breather and upgrade, the train will then set off slightly quicker than your last run. The train will catch fire, llamas will come along and drink all your water, a thief will steal your resources and so much more. Unrailed! is a game of constant movement and it really is hilarious. [...] The big 1.0 release pulls in a new biome to build through, a "Kids" difficulty mode if Easy was still to difficult, an Extreme difficulty mode if you like to be punished, a new wagon to attach to your train, new characters and something that looks like another wagon but they kept it secret so you just have to find out.