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Orange Pi Zero2 is a Tiny Allwinner H6 SBC with HDMI 2.0, USB 3.0, Ethernet & WiFi

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Debian
Ubuntu

It’s always frustrating to see boards with USB 3.0 and Fast Ethernet, since there’s no benefit over USB 2.0 for networked storage. But this is usually to cut costs, and in this case the PCB’s size may have been a problem to accommodate the extra transceiver required for Gigabit Ethernet.

Supported operating systems are said to be Android7.0, Ubuntu, and Debian, but this information is not always correct before launch. The good news is that Orange Pi 3 SBC, also powered by Allwinner H6 processor, is supported in Armbian, albeit only with WIP Debian 10 and Ubuntu 18.04 images, meaning they are suitable for testing, but not necessarily stable.

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More on Orange Pi Zero2 and Librem 5 'Plug'

  • Orange Pi Zero2 mini PC supports Android & Linux, measures 2.2 inches wide

    About three years after launching a tiny single-board computer called the Orange Pi Zero, the folks at Shenzhen Xunlong are introducing a Orange Pie Zero2 with a faster processor, an HDMI port, and other upgrades.

    It still measures just 2.2″ x 2.2″ across, making it one of the smallest single-board computers I’m aware of to feature a 64-bit, quad-core processor and full-sized USB, HDMI, and Ethernet ports.

  • The Librem 5 Smartphone in Forbes

    Purism’s crowdfunding campaigns on the Crowd Supply platform consistently achieved more than their funding goal. The latest, concerning the Librem 5 smartphone, raised over $2 million. And what makes the Librem 5 smartphone different from other phones? Several factors, such as the business model, an engaged community, and the fact that privacy and security are starting to be a great concern– and not just for everyday smartphone users but for the government as well.

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