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GNU Radio 3.8.0.0

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Development
GNU

Tonight, we release GNU Radio 3.8.0.0.

It’s the first minor release version since more than six years, not without pride this community stands to face the brightest future SDR on general purpose hardware ever had.

Since we’ve not been documenting changes in the shape of a Changelog for the whole of the development that happened since GNU Radio 3.7.0, I’m afraid that these release notes will be more of a GLTL;DR (git log too long; didn’t read) than a detailed account of what has changed.

What has not changed is the fact that GNU Radio is centered around a very simple truth:

Let the developers hack on DSP. Software interfaces are for humans, not the other way around.

And so, compared to the later 3.7 releases, nothing has fundamentally modified the way one develops signal processing systems with GNU Radio: You write blocks, and you combine blocks to be part of a larger signal processing flow graph.

With that as a success story, we of course have faced quite a bit of change in the systems we use to develop and in the people that develop GNU Radio. This has lead to several changes that weren’t compatible with 3.7.

Read more

Also: GNU Radio Sees Its First Release In More Than Six Years

GNU Radio 3.8.0.0 released

  • GNU Radio 3.8.0.0 released

    Dear most patient SDR community to ever expect a release,

    Witness me!

    Tonight, we release GNU Radio 3.8.0.0.

    It's the first minor release version since more than six years, not without
    pride this community stands to face the brightest future SDR on general purpose
    hardware ever had.

    Since we've not been documenting changes in the shape of a Changelog for the
    whole of the development that happened since GNU Radio 3.7.0, I'm afraid that
    these release notes will be more of a GLTL;DR (git log too long; didn't read)
    than a detailed account of what has changed.

GNU Radio 3.8.0.0 releases with new dependencies

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