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LibreOffice 6.3 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Here's What's New

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The third major, feature-full update to the latest LibreOffice 6 office suite series, LibreOffice 6.3, comes exactly six months after the LibreOffice 6.2 release to add better performance, enhanced interoperability with proprietary document formats, as well as a set of new features and other improvements.

The LibreOffice 6.3 office suite will be supported for the next ten months with smaller maintenance updates until May 29, 2020. The Document Foundation has planned a total of six point releases for LibreOffice 6.3, but currently recommends users the LibreOffice 6.2 series for extra stability in production environments.

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LibreOffice 6.3 Released With Better Performance, UI Enhancement

  • LibreOffice 6.3 Released With Better Performance, UI Enhancements

    After a slight delay, The Document Foundation this morning announced the release of the LibreOffice 6.3 cross-platform open-source office suite.

    This leading Microsoft Office alternative has performance improvements particularly around Writer (its word processor) and Calc (spreadsheet) components, the tabbed compact user-interface work is now available throughout more of the suite, better PDF export support, continually ongoing improvements to the Microsoft Office file format interoperability support, and a plethora of other improvements.

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3

  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3

    LibreOffice 6.3’s new features have been developed by a large community of code contributors: 65% of commits are from developers employed by companies sitting in the Advisory Board like Collabora, Red Hat and CIB, plus other organizations, and 35% are from individual volunteers.

    In addition, there is a global community of individual volunteers taking care of other fundamental activities such as quality assurance, software localization, user interface design and user experience, editing of help system and documentation, plus free software and open document standards advocacy.

LibreOffice 6.3 Released, Up to 97% Faster At Opening Files

  • LibreOffice 6.3 Released, Up to 97% Faster At Opening Files

    LibreOffice 6.3 is the latest version of The Document Foundation’ open source office suite for Windows, macOS and Linux — and it’s pretty big on changes.

    Among the new LibreOffice 6.3 features that productivity-focused folks will benefit from are A, B and, important for secret government agencies, the ability to redact information from documents.

    You’ll see a new “tip of the day” dialog open on startup (once per day). There’s also a new “what’s new? infobar” linking to the LibreOffice release notes when launching an updated version of the suite for the first time.

The king of open source office suite version 6.3 is released!

  • The king of open source office suite version 6.3 is released!

    Libreoffice is one of the leading opensource cross-platform (Linux, Windows, MacOs) project, that offer Linux users specially a great free office suite alternative to the commercial MS office suite. The team behin it, continue their hard work to introduce us today as Linux users, the new update that brings remarkable improvements and notable changes.

LibreOffice 6.3 released, here are the new features

  • LibreOffice 6.3 released, here are the new features

    As a result of the efforts by the Document Foundation, LibreOffice 6.3 is here with improved performance, better interoperability, and a variety of new features.

    LibreOffice 6.3 comes with a lot of features, which is impressive considering that LibreOffice 6.2 was released just six months ago. However, it should be noted that The Document Foundation has decided not to include 32-bit binaries starting from this release. So only users with 64-bit architecture will be able to apply this update. Getting back on track, let’s delve into what the new LibreOffice has in store for us.

LibreOffice 6.3 released

  • LibreOffice 6.3 released

    Writer and Calc performance has been improved by an order of magnitude based on documents provided by end users: text files with different bookmarks, tables and embedded fonts, large ODS/XLSX spreadsheets, and Calc files with VLOOKUP load and render more quickly. Saving Calc spreadsheets as XLS files is also faster.

Bit of a time-saver: LibreOffice emits 6.3 with new features

  • Bit of a time-saver: LibreOffice emits 6.3 with new features, loading and UI boosts

    The Document Foundation has made some tweaks to improve file loading and save times in its word processor and spreadsheet programs in the latest version of LibreOffice, 6.3.

    The open-source office suite for Windows, macOS and Linux – which consists of a word processor, spreadsheet, presentation graphics, diagramming tool and database manager – began in 2011 as a fork of Oracle's OpenOffice (now Apache OpenOffice). The origins of the project go right back to the '80s, when it was a commercial office suite called Star Office.

    The foundation now comes up with a major new release around every six months. The previous version, 6.2, was released in February 2019.

    This release fixes the security issue whereby documents could auto-run arbitrary system commands automatically on opening, thanks to a component called LibreLogo and its interaction with Python. LibreLogo, intended for teaching programming, is still included by default on Windows, even though most users have no use for it.

LibreOffice 6.3 Boosts Document Performance, Fixes Security Bugs

  • LibreOffice 6.3 Boosts Document Performance, Fixes Security Bugs

    Major update improves loading and saving times for complex documents, improves compatibility with Microsoft Office formats and adds new features

    LibreOffice, the open source alternative to Microsoft Office, has improved file loading times and added new features in the major version 6.3 release.

    The project, which began in 2010 as a fork of OpenOffice, is developed by The Document Foundation and now aims to release major updates every six months, with the last coming in February. Version 6.2 introduced a tabbed ribbon-like interface option.

    Two of the suite’s components, Writer and Calc, now load and save files significantly faster, and a security issue that could have allowed documents to auto-run arbitrary system commands has been fixed.

    Developers targeted files known to present performance problems, such as Writer ODT files with large numbers of bookmarks and documents with large tables or embedded fonts, and performance on these has now been improved.

A look at LibreOffice’s new 6.3.0 “fresh” release

  • A look at LibreOffice’s new 6.3.0 “fresh” release

    The open source office suite LibreOffice released its version 6.3.0 last week. This was a major release that added many new features, as well as interoperability enhancements (read: better import and export of Microsoft Office documents) and performance increases. LibreOffice 6.3.0 is a "fresh" (not long-term support) release that may be downloaded directly—or, if you're a Linux user, you might choose to install it from the Snap Store instead. Ubuntu (and probably most Linux users) will get a separate installation of LibreOffice 6.3.0 regardless of whether users install natively from download or install from snaps; Windows users who download the new version will have their existing LibreOffice version (if any) completely replaced upon installation.

    The release notes for 6.3.0 boast of several performance improvements related to loading and saving documents in Writer and Calc. We were able to confirm these performance improvements—but only when installing LibreOffice natively. When we tested LibreOffice 6.3.0 installed from the Snap Store, performance was fine when actually inside the app and working on a document. But application launch times were significantly slower.

New LibreOffice out

  • New LibreOffice out

    The open source office suite LibreOffice released its version 6.3 with many new features, interoperability enhancements and performance increases.

    There are several performance improvements related to loading and saving documents in Writer and Calc. For example there is a FOURIER() function in its spreadsheet app Calc.

    The biggest improvement are the document redaction tools which enables you to stick black bars you see across sensitive passages in documents that are only intended to be partially released.

    When you select Tools⟶Redact, a Draw window opens up with your flattened document in it. So does a simplified toolset allowing you to draw boxes or scribble over content you don't want to expose. When you're done, you can export the redacted version of a document; this produces a completely flattened PDF. There are no hidden text elements to be sleuthed out by pesky journalists.

LibreOffice 6.3: 10 days of stats

  • LibreOffice 6.3: 10 days of stats

    On August 8, The Document Foundation announced the release of LibreOffice 6.3 with new features, performance boosts and compatibility improvements. A big thanks to our volunteer community and certified developers for making this release happen!

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