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Ubuntu 19.10 to Support ZFS on Root as an Experimental Option in the Installer

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) will be the next major release of the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, and also a testbed for Canonical to implement new features and see if they prove to be useful to the community for upcoming LTS (Long Term Support) releases, such as next year's Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

One of these new features coming to the Ubuntu 19.10 release this fall is an experimental option implemented in the graphical installer to let users create a root file system formatted with the ZFS file system. But Canonical warns users that they should not use it on a production machine.

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Also: Canonical Confirms Their Experimental ZFS Plans For The Ubuntu 19.10 Desktop

Enhancing our ZFS support on Ubuntu 19.10 – an introduction

Ubuntu 19.10 Will Offer Experimental ZFS File System Option

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Will Offer Experimental ZFS File System Option

    Have you been itching to know more about Ubuntu’s ZFS file system plans? Well, get ready to stop scratching, ‘cos Canonical has revealed all.

    Now, I know as much about filesystems as I do about world wrestling: that’s to say nothing, other than it can be painful if you’re an amateur. Yet even I’m getting a tiny bit excited by Canonical’s efforts with ZFS.

    The newly announced plan — which I should stress could still go south, but probably won’t, but could, but shouldn’t — is to include an ZFS install option in Ubuntu 19.10, the next short term release due this October.

Canonical set to bring ZFS improvements

  • Canonical set to bring ZFS improvements over the coming Ubuntu cycles

    Canonical has announced that beginning with Ubuntu 19.10, it will begin improving the state of the ZFS file system to make it more practical for desktop users. Ubuntu 19.10 will be the first release with improvements but it’ll be a multi-cycle effort until a time when Canonical feels that it’s production-ready.

    In the first place, Canonical wants to make improvements to Ubuntu’s ZFS support for it to work better on the desktop. In its announcement, the firm said further down the road it’d like to bring it to server releases, presumably when the technology is more mature. Although improvements will be available with Ubuntu 19.10, Canonical warns not to use it on production systems because data may get erased at any time.

Ubuntu 19.10 Will Come with Support for ZFS

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Will Come with Support for ZFS

    Canonical has announced that it has plans with regards to implementing support for ZFS on the root file system, for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system. This operating system will be the next major release of the most-known Ubuntu Linux operating system. It will also be the test doe Canonical to actually include brand new features to see if they are useful to the community for the next LTS releases.

    One of the new features that we were talking about will be released this fall and is an experimental option included in the graphical installer. It is supposed to let its users create a root file system formatted with the ZFS file system. However, Canonical warns its users that they should not use it on a production machine.

Canonical adds ZFS on root as experimental install option

  • Canonical adds ZFS on root as experimental install option in Ubuntu

    Canonical is expanding Ubuntu's support for ZFS, an advanced file system originally developed by Sun Microsystems.

    Ubuntu's support is based on the ZFS on Linux project, which itself is based on code ported from OpenSolaris, Sun's open-source operating system. It is licensed under Sun's Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL).

    Ubuntu Eoan (19.10, due in October) will ship with ZFS on Linux 0.8.1. Features include data integrity checks, built-in RAID, vast capacity thanks to being 128-bit, built-in encryption, deduplication and copy-on-write cloning, built-in compression, and efficient checkpoints which let you snapshot a storage pool and recover it later. There is also TRIM support for SSDs.

Ubuntu 19.10 will now support experimental ZFS root file-system

  • Ubuntu 19.10 will now support experimental ZFS root file-system install option

    In order to make the basic and advanced concepts of ZFS easily accessible and transparent to users, Ubuntu is developing a new user space daemon, called zsys, which is a ZFS system tool. It will allow multiple ZFS systems to run in parallel on the same machine, and have other advantages like automated snapshots, separating user data from system and persistent data to manage complex zfs dataset layouts.

    Ubuntu is designing the system in such a way that people with little knowledge of ZFS will also be able to use it flexibly. Zsys’s cooperation with GRUB and ZFS on Linux initramfs will yield advanced features which will be made official by Ubuntu, later on.

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