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Devices: 'IoT', SparkFun and Beelink L55

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  • Top 20 Best Internet of Things Projects (IoT Projects) That You can Make Right Now

    Internet of Things (IoT) is a new predominant technology for this advanced world. This technology can change the lifestyle people lead. Question is what the Internet of Things is? IoT can be described as a network of physical objects connected through the internet. Physical objects could be anything that contains embedded electronics, software, sensor, etc. with the internet. Using the IP addresses, those smart objects can exchange data among the network and can make a decision. A significant number of researches is going on over the IoT trends and projects. In this article, we will talk about a few IoT project ideas based on standard IoT protocols, so that readers get the basic knowledge about the Internet of Things. These internet of things example are keen, useful, and interesting to build.

  • Open-Source SparkFun Module Supports Low-Power TensorFlow Machine Learning

    SparkFun has released the SparkFun Artemis, Engineering Version, an open-source embedded development kit that supports the TensorFlow machine learning environment. Designed for toolchain-agnostic, low-power machine learning development, the 15.5 mm x 10.5 mm Artemis board includes...

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    In addition to a secure firmware update system, flexible, serial peripherals, a suite of clock sources, and camera compatibility, the Artemis board features large SMD pads that support carrier board implementations. SparkFun has launched three carrier boards in conjunction with the release of the Artemis, Engineering version board: the BlackBoard Artemis (Arduino Uno footprint); BlackBoard Artemis Nano (smallest form factor); and BlackBoard Artemis ATP (with 48 GPIO pins).

  • Beelink L55 Review – An Intel Core i3-5005U Mini PC Tested with Windows 10 & Ubuntu 18.04

    With the shortage of Gemini Lake processors, some manufacturers have taken to releasing new mini PCs using older CPUs

More in Tux Machines

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button. Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those. All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update. Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

Today in Techrights

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal. Read more