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IBM, Fedora, and Servers

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Red Hat
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  • Red Hat CTO Chris Wright to host online Q&A

    On Tuesday, July 23, 2019, Red Hat senior vice president and CTO Chris Wright will host an online forum to answer questions about what IBM's landmark acquisition of Red Hat means for the company and its work in open source projects.

  • Announcing Fedora CoreOS preview

    On behalf of the Fedora CoreOS Working Group, I'm thrilled to announce the first preview release of Fedora CoreOS. Fedora CoreOS is built to be the secure and reliable host for your compute clusters. It's designed specifically for running containerized workloads without regular maintenance, automatically updating itself with the latest OS improvements, bug fixes, and security updates. The initial preview release of Fedora CoreOS runs on bare metal, QEMU, VMware, and AWS, on x86_64 only. It supports provisioning via Ignition spec 3.0.0 and the Fedora CoreOS Config Transpiler, automatic updates with Zincati and rpm-ostree, and running containers with Podman and Moby. In the coming months, we'll be adding more platforms, building out functionality, and creating documentation to get Fedora CoreOS ready for production use. For now, the Fedora CoreOS preview should not be used for production workloads, and it might change in incompatible ways before the stable release.

  • Pivotal Brings the Magic of CF Push to Kubernetes

    Today, Pivotal released an alpha version of its flagship product, Pivotal Application Service, powered by Kubernetes. Access to the bits are invite-only; contact your account team or sign up via the form at the end of this post for access. The documentation is publicly available here.

    Kubernetes is the new IaaS. And that means we're embedding it into more parts of Pivotal technology. It also means that we're here to help you achieve terrific business outcomes on top of this foundation.

  • Build cloud-native apps faster for Kubernetes with Kabanero, a new open source project from IBM

    As companies modernize their infrastructure and adopt a hybrid cloud strategy, they’re increasingly turning to Kubernetes and containers. Choosing the right technology for building cloud-native apps and gaining the knowledge you need to effectively adopt Kubernetes is difficult. On top of that, enabling architects, developers, and operations to work together easily, while having their individual requirements met, is an additional challenge when moving to cloud.
    To lower the barrier of entry for developers to use Kubernetes and to bring together different disciplines, IBM created new open source projects that make it faster and easier for you to develop and deploy applications for Kubernetes.

  • Kubernetes VS PaaS

    If you asked me 3 years ago, I would probably define the professional part of myself as a “Rails developer”. Back then, most of my new projects started with a proof of concept deployed on a free Heroku account. The reason is simple, that was the fastest way to get my Ruby application live. At the same time it was the cheapest (free right?) so that was a no-brainer.
    The last 2.5 years, my work has been mostly on CloudFoundry and Kubernetes. CloudFoundry is an Open Source PaaS solution and Kubernetes is a Container orchestration platform. I work on a project that combines these two (SUSE CloudFoundry runs CloudFoundry on top of Kubernetes). There is an argument I’ve heard more than once regarding running a PaaS on top of Kubernetes and that is: “Why deploy CloudFoundry on top of Kubernetes and not use Kubernetes directly?”. Maybe it’s my science studies, maybe it’s Myth Busters, but I had to test this theory. Thankfully, 2 times a year we get a week to hack on anything we want at SUSE (Check it out) so I got the time I needed a couple of weeks ago.

  • Issue #2019.07.22 – Kubeflow and Conferences, 2019

    Kubeflow at OSCON 2019 – Over 10 sessions! Covering security, pipelines, productivity, ML ops and more. Some of the sessions are led by end-users, which means you’ll get the real deal about using Kubeflow in your production solution

  • How to earn a promotion as a sysadmin

    There’s plenty of general advice when it comes to career advancement, such as, “Work hard and you’ll get ahead.”

    General advice can start to feel a little pat—too simplistic to put into action, or too difficult to measure. Surely, it’s not as simple as, “Work hard and watch the promotions roll in.” Not to mention, how would you know if it’s the right promotion. Is it one that matches your goals?

    This question becomes particularly important in IT. What if you’re a sysadmin who’s not particularly interested in managing a team of people? Do you grin and bear it while others move up the food chain?

More in Tux Machines

KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button. Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those. All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update. Read more

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

Today in Techrights

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal. Read more