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Linux 5.3, LWN's Kernel Coverage and the Linux Foundation

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  • Linux 5.3 Enables "-Wimplicit-fallthrough" Compiler Flag

    The recent work on enabling "-Wimplicit-fallthrough" behavior for the Linux kernel has culminated in Linux 5.3 with actually being able to universally enable this compiler feature.

    The -Wimplicit-fallthrough flag on GCC7 and newer warns of cases where switch case fall-through behavior could lead to potential bugs / unexpected behavior.

  • EXT4 For Linux 5.3 Gets Fixes & Faster Case-Insensitive Lookups

    The EXT4 file-system updates have already landed for the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window that opened this week.

    For Linux 5.3, EXT4 maintainer Ted Ts'o sent in primarily a hearty serving of fixes. There are fixes from coverity warnings being addressed to typos and other items for this mature and widely-used Linux file-system.

  • Providing wider access to bpf()

    The bpf() system call allows user space to load a BPF program into the kernel for execution, manipulate BPF maps, and carry out a number of other BPF-related functions. BPF programs are verified and sandboxed, but they are still running in a privileged context and, depending on the type of program loaded, are capable of creating various types of mayhem. As a result, most BPF operations, including the loading of almost all types of BPF program, are restricted to processes with the CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability — those running as root, as a general rule. BPF programs are useful in many contexts, though, so there has long been interest in making access to bpf() more widely available. One step in that direction has been posted by Song Liu; it works by adding a novel security-policy mechanism to the kernel.
    This approach is easy enough to describe. A new special device, /dev/bpf is added, with the core idea that any process that has the permission to open this file will be allowed "to access most of sys_bpf() features" — though what comprises "most" is never really spelled out. A non-root process that wants to perform a BPF operation, such as creating a map or loading a program, will start by opening this file. It then must perform an ioctl() call (BPF_DEV_IOCTL_GET_PERM) to actually enable its ability to call bpf(). That ability can be turned off again with the BPF_DEV_IOCTL_PUT_PERM ioctl() command.

    Internally to the kernel, this mechanism works by adding a new field (bpf_flags) to the task_struct structure. When BPF access is enabled, a bit is set in that field. If this patch goes forward, that detail is likely to change since, as Daniel Borkmann pointed out, adding an unsigned long to that structure for a single bit of information is unlikely to be popular; some other location for that bit will be found.

  • The io.weight I/O-bandwidth controller

    Part of the kernel's job is to arbitrate access to the available hardware resources and ensure that every process gets its fair share, with "its fair share" being defined by policies specified by the administrator. One resource that must be managed this way is I/O bandwidth to storage devices; if due care is not taken, an I/O-hungry process can easily saturate a device, starving out others. The kernel has had a few I/O-bandwidth controllers over the years, but the results have never been entirely satisfactory. But there is a new controller on the block that might just get the job done.
    There are a number of challenges facing an I/O-bandwidth controller. Some processes may need a guarantee that they will get at least a minimum amount of the available bandwidth to a given device. More commonly in recent times, though, the focus has shifted to latency: a process should be able to count on completing an I/O request within a bounded period of time. The controller should be able to provide those guarantees while still driving the underlying device at something close to its maximum rate. And, of course, hardware varies widely, so the controller must be able to adapt its operation to each specific device.

    The earliest I/O-bandwidth controller allows the administrator to set maximum bandwidth limits for each control group. That controller, though, will throttle I/O even if the device is otherwise idle, causing the loss of I/O bandwidth. The more recent io.latency controller is focused on I/O latency, but as Tejun Heo, the author of the new controller, notes in the patch series, this controller really only protects the lowest-latency group, penalizing all others if need be to meet that group's requirements. He set out to create a mechanism that would allow more control over how I/O bandwidth is allocated to groups.

  • TurboSched: the return of small-task packing

    CPU scheduling is a difficult task in the best of times; it is not trivial to pick the next process to run while maintaining fairness, minimizing energy use, and using the available CPUs to their fullest potential. The advent of increasingly complex system architectures is not making things easier; scheduling on asymmetric systems (such as the big.LITTLE architecture) is a case in point. The "turbo" mode provided by some recent processors is another. The TurboSched patch set from Parth Shah is an attempt to improve the scheduler's ability to get the best performance from such processors.
    Those of us who have been in this field for far too long will, when seeing "turbo mode", think back to the "turbo button" that appeared on personal computers in the 1980s. Pushing it would clock the processor beyond its original breathtaking 4.77MHz rate to something even faster — a rate that certain applications were unprepared for, which is why the "go slower" mode was provided at all. Modern turbo mode is a different thing, though, and it's not just a matter of a missing front-panel button. In short, it allows a processor to be overclocked above its rated maximum frequency for a period of time when the load on the rest of system overall allows it.

    Turbo mode can thus increase the CPU cycles available to a given process, but there is a reason why the CPU's rated maximum frequency is lower than what turbo mode provides. The high-speed mode can only be sustained as long as the CPU temperature does not get too high and, crucially (for the scheduler), the overall power load on the system must not be too high. That, in turn, implies that some CPUs must be powered down; if all CPUs are running, there will not be enough power available for any of those CPUs to go into the turbo mode. This mode, thus, is only usable for certain types of workloads and will not be usable (or beneficial) for many others.

  • EdgeX Foundry Announces Production Ready Release Providing Open Platform for IoT Edge Computing to a Growing Global Ecosystem

    EdgeX Foundry, a project under the LF Edge umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge IoT computing independent of hardware, silicon, application cloud, or operating system, today announced the availability of its “Edinburgh” release. Created collaboratively by a global ecosystem, EdgeX Foundry’s new release is a key enabler of digital transformation for IoT use cases and is a platform for real-world applications both for developers and end users across many vertical markets. EdgeX community members have created a range of complementary products and services, including commercial support, training and customer pilot programs and plug-in enhancements for device connectivity, applications, data and system management and security.

    Launched in April 2017, and now part of the LF Edge umbrella, EdgeX Foundry is an open source, loosely-coupled microservices framework that provides the choice to plug and play from a growing ecosystem of available third party offerings or to augment proprietary innovations. With a focus on the IoT Edge, EdgeX simplifies the process to design, develop and deploy solutions across industrial, enterprise, and consumer applications.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • npm is moving back to its developer roots, founder says

    Everyone has an opinion on what NPM should do next, both as a company (npm, Inc.) and as the package manager (npm) made essential by Node.js. That's not surprising: More than 11 million JavaScript developers use npm (and associated npm registry) to build their applications, whether they use Node.js or not. It's also not a particularly easy question to resolve, given the turmoil npm Inc. has experienced over the past year, what with the introduction (and eventual departure) of CEO Bryan Bogensberger and employee unrest in his wake. Talking to npm founder and Chief Open Technologies officer Isaac Schlueter, however, the right strategy for "building a sustainable engine behind an open source labor of love" might well be a return to npm's roots.

  • Open source community should help fight fake news

    That’s the view of Aroma Rodrigues, a full-time Python developer at a major bank in India and a part-time software activist. She told delegates at last week’s PyConZA 2019, part of SA’s Open Source Week, that they can and should be doing more to use their skills for social good. [...] For example, the US-based Knight Foundation, which was established to promote excellence in journalism, examined more than 10 million tweets from 700 000 Twitter accounts before, during and after the 2016 US presidential election. The study found that identified clusters of Twitter accounts linked back to more than 600 fake and conspiracy news sites repeatedly, often in ways that seemed to be co-ordinated, or even automated, in order to sway public opinion one way or another.

  • Open source community should embrace the spirit of ubuntu

    In an interview with ITWeb at the conference, Nkosi pointed out that although open source was about community, “we are not using it as community”. [...] The word 'ubuntu' loosely translates to “I am because we are”. This, Nkosi asserted, was essentially the premise of open source software, which was about harnessing the collective power of the community.

  • How the top open source AI software drives innovation

    Open source software and tools have long been a mainstay of the computing ecosystem, especially over the past two decades. From the popularity of Linux in the enterprise server environment to the Firefox browser, open source has found a successful place in the computing hierarchy. It should come as little surprise that open source AI software is finding significant popularity and use within the machine learning and deep learning ecosystem, as well. In fact, much of the technology that powers AI is open source. This comes as a contrast to other enterprise technology, such as operating systems and databases that had their initial roots in closed, licensed software.

  • Catalan separatists have tooled up with a decentralized app for civil disobedience

    One of the first protest actions programmed by a new online activist group, calling itself Tsunami Democràtic, saw thousands of protestors coalescing on Barcelona airport Monday, in an attempt to shut it down. The protest didn’t quite do that but it did lead to major disruption, with roads blocked by human traffic as protestors walked down the highway and the cancelation of more than 100 flights, plus hours of delays for travellers arriving into El Prat. For months leading up to a major Supreme Court verdict on the fate of imprisoned Catalan political leaders a ‘technical elite‘ — as one local political science academic described them this week — has been preparing to reboot Catalonia’s independence movement by developing bespoke, decentralized high-tech protest tools. A source with knowledge of Tsunami Democràtic, speaking to TechCrunch on condition of anonymity, told us that “high level developers” located all around the world are involved in the effort, divvying up coding tasks as per any large scale IT project and leveraging open source resources (such as the RetroShare node-based networking platform) to channel grassroots support for independence into a resilient campaign network that can’t be stopped by the arrest of a few leaders.

  • To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source

    The European Union aims to reduce carbon emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050. Former California Governor Jerry Brown signed an executive order last year calling for the state, the fifth-largest economy in the world, to go carbon neutral by 2045. Meeting these goals, or even the less ambitious goals set by other governments, will require utilities to buy more energy from sustainable sources like wind and solar power. That shift is already creating logistical challenges for utilities. Unlike more predictable sources of energy, the energy produced by a wind farm can vary from day to day, forcing utilities to offload excess supplies and make up for shortages. The solar panels on residential rooftops that feed into the grid pose their own challenges because the grid wasn't designed to facilitate a two-way flow of energy. To meet those technological challenges, the energy sector is turning to open source software. Open source, which anyone can modify or share, helped power the rise of internet giants like Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Ostensible competitors worked together to develop software like the data-crunching platform Hadoop because it enabled them to solve difficult computing problems. Now all sorts of companies, ranging from Microsoft to Walmart to JP Morgan Chase use and make open source software. But the energy industry has lagged behind others in using and creating open source software, says Loek Bakker, head of information management at Dutch energy distribution company TenneT. "The energy industry isn't known for being innovative," he says. "I think we're quite a traditional industry."

  • Open FinTech Forum Brings Together Technologists and Business Executives to Accelerate Development in Finance Sector

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the speakers and program for Open FinTech Forum taking place December 9, 2019 at the Convene Conference Center in New York.

  • LF Energy Brings Power System Leaders Together with Open Source Experts at Paris Summit to Implement the Grid of the Future

    LF Energy, a nonprofit, vendor-neutral initiative from The Linux Foundation, whose mission is to accelerate the energy and electricity sectors’ worldwide decarbonization goals through open-source technology, announced the full agenda for its first global summit, NOW TO NEXT - The Power of Together, as well as the addition of Alliander, EDP, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts and Unicorn as new LF Energy members. NOW TO NEXT, which will be hosted in La Défense, Paris, on Nov. 4-5, will bring together leaders and innovators in the power and technology industries to discuss the global transition to clean energy. Industry leaders have realized that no one can meet decarbonization goals alone. Instead, we must work together to transition the 150-year-old power grid infrastructure to smarter and more efficient digital technologies that enable decentralized energy resources.

  • Percona Open Source Software Database Survey Reveals Shift Toward Diversity

    Percona, a leader in open source database software and services, today announced the results of its Open Source Software Database Survey. More than 830 members of the Percona community and customer base, representing small, medium and large companies from around the world, responded to questions regarding open source database usage and growth. The survey revealed that diverse tools and environments, including multiple databases and multi-cloud and hybrid environments, are transforming today’s datacenters.

  • Public Health England - open source and containerisation key to tech agenda
  • Moodle Announces the Integration of H5P
  • SDSC Launches Open-Source ‘SeedMeLab’

    Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego have launched an open-source software called SeedMeLab, which provides a host of features for researchers across all disciplines to manage and disseminate their data products internally and externally from a personalized and branded data cloud with full ownership and control. Under development and rigorous testing for past five years, SeedMeLab is a result of $1.3 million National Science Foundation (NSF) award to create a set of web-based building blocks that lets scientists seamlessly share and access preliminary results and transient data from research on a variety of platforms, including mobile devices. SeedMe is short for ‘Swiftly Encode, Explore and Disseminate My Experiments.’ “Offered as an open-source software or a managed service from SDSC, SeedMeLab eliminates content fragmentation—that is data, its context, and its discussion—and enables quick reference of data/research context that’s critical during research phase and very useful for long tail use of data products” said SDSC Visualization Group leader Amit Chourasia, principal investigator for the project. “SeedMeLab also boosts team productivity by facilitating knowledge transfer between lab members in a sustained way, and it is now available for researchers to overcome data management gaps that have been an issue in the past. SeedMeLab is an important stepping stone for researchers to realize FAIR data management in practice.”

  • Senate Bill Would Open Some Weather Agency Models to the Public

    A bipartisan bill introduced in the Senate Tuesday would require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which collects and models scientific data for weather forecasting purposes, to make certain operational weather models publicly available. Under the Learning Excellence and Good Examples from New Developers, or LEGEND Act, NOAA would also “periodically review innovations and improvements” to operational models made by third parties and the public. The bill would give NOAA’s administrator authority to utilize certain outside innovations.

  • Former Catalyst CEO Launches New Open Source Push for Legal Tech

    John Tredennick, founder and former CEO of e-discovery company Catalyst Repository Systems, has accepted the challenge of bringing free, open source legal tech to an industry notoriously known as a slow tech adopter.

Openwashing Leftovers

  • SOSA Consortium’s C4ISR Demonstrator System Shows Value of Open-Source Tech in Mil/Aero Apps

    Actually, these marketplaces have had some level of collaborative effort due to common development trends and regulatory compliance activity, but nothing like the kind of active open environment that exists in other spaces. The military community is specifically reluctant to adopt more open development methods due to the secretive nature of military capability disclosure. Yet there are areas in core platform development that can benefit from an open-source approach.

  • New WSO2 Identity Server Release Provides a Hassle-Free Configuration Model and RESTful APIs for Self-Service IAM

    Digitally driven businesses face unprecedented complexity in protecting not only their own data and privacy but that of globally distributed customers, partners and employees using a variety of personal computing and mobile devices. WSO2 offers several new capabilities to help enterprises address these demands with the latest release of WSO2 Identity Server for identity and access management (IAM). Using WSO2 Identity Server, IT organizations now have an open source, API-driven, developer friendly solution for modernizing application security and delivering an enhanced user experience that encourages adoption.

  • Winding Tree and Travel Forward to host open-source Hackathon

    Key industry leaders such as Air France, KLM, and Etihad Airways have participated in Winding Tree’s previous two #HackTravel hackathons, one in Prague in December 2018, and the second most recently in Lisbon in July 2019.

  • SalesAgility announces 7th UK Open Source Awards, 2020

    SalesAgility are delighted to announce that the 7th UK Open Source Awards (UKOSA) will take place on Thursday May 21st 2020. We're also delighted to announce that once again they'll be held in the Edinburgh University Computing faculty's Informatics Forum. The awards are designed to recognise and celebrate the innovation, diversity, collaboration and creativity that are core components of Open Source software creation and maintenance. Previous winners have included contributors from several NHS healthcare projects, the Gnome project, Collabora (LibreOffice) and students from Edinburgh and Aberystwyth Universities.

  • How Google and Facebook do code analysis

    Facebook has reported target “fix rates” (how often developers fix the bug flagged by a tool) of 70% to 80%, and Google strives for greater than 90% fix rates for its ErrorProne code analysis tool. By only deploying tools with high fix rates, these companies maintain the trust of developers and ensure that they continue to act on important issues found by these tools. But how do you know whether a new tool meets this threshold? The best approach is to be data-driven. The developer tooling groups at these companies collect data on which bugs are getting fixed and support explicit developer feedback on tool results. This data is constantly monitored to flag tools that are underperforming so they can improve or remove them.

  • Weekly Wrap: AWS Makes It Rain, Extends Credits to Open Source Projects
  • AWS Makes It Rain, Extends Credits to Open Source Projects
  • AWS tempts open source projects with promo credit sweeteners

    Principal Open Source Technologist Arun Gupta and Operations Manager Vicente explained the initiative in a blog post mentioning the credits were typically used for testing, storage, or CI/CD purposes. First beneficiaries include the Rust and Julia programming languages, Java community project AdoptOpenJDK, Java component repository Maven Central, and a couple of projects hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

  • AWS' open source entreaties now include cloud credits

    AWS will offer promotional cloud credits to open source project maintainers that meet certain criteria. The move comes after repeated tensions with some companies.

  • Is AWS sponsoring Rust? Only a bit – and so is Microsoft Azure

    AWS has announced its "Sponsorship of the Rust project", causing some initial excitement in the community. However, in reality it only amounts to a year of AWS "promotional credits." "We're really excited to announce that AWS is sponsoring the Rust programming language," reads a statement by David Barsky (engineer on Rust runtime for Lambda), Arun Gupta (open source technical evangelist), and Jacob Peddicord (open-source engineer).

  • Groundbreaking CloudCO Demo at Broadband World Forum 2019 Made Possible by UNH-IOL’s Role as Open Broadband Lab

    The intention of the OB-Labs initiative is to demonstrate an open framework for cloud-based broadband for carriers globally, and bring the promise of SDN and NFV to fruition. The demo at BBWF 2019 was built from a combination of open source from the OPNFV, ONAP, and Open Broadband Access Abstraction (OB-BAA) projects and products from Nokia, Altice Labs, DZS, and VMware. A first of its kind demonstration, this implementation truly shows the power of a well-defined architecture and the agility of an open community.

  • flexiWAN Announces Global Channel Partner Program for MSPs, SIs and VAR Offering SD-WAN Services
  • Mavenir Swings for Big Leagues With OpenRAN
  • Beware Systems Integrator Lock-In, Open Source Dependency

    Broadband World Forum 2019 -- Kings can be tyrants, but at least they give you an easy target to punch when something goes wrong and revolution follows. Telcos in a perpetual huff about the ruling trio of Ericsson, Huawei and Nokia could be in for a more slippery autocracy with the emergence of systems integrators, a cabal of tiny vendors and some unwieldy open source platforms. Operators are worried, too. "Yes," said BT's Simon Fisher when asked during a panel session here if there is a danger of going from one form of lock-in to another. "You are squeezing complexity and cost into the software side of the business." [...] "I guess the fear is that because ONAP is open source it will be easier for bad actors to explore (than a commercial solution) and, if widely adopted, worthwhile trying to hack," noted Crawshaw.

  • Broadband Forum, ONF create virtualisation and open source roadmap

    A new agreement between Broadband Forum (BBF) and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is set to ease the path to automated and open virtualised access networks. The roadmap sets forth how operators seeking to effectively use virtualisation and open source to increase agility can leverage open source and standardisation projects side-by-side to ease their migrations to automated access networks and enable seamless co-existence. As the broadband industry embarks on the next phase of broadband deployment, numerous new business opportunities are emerging that require rapid service instantiation, often across disparate, software-defined networks, and leveraging third-party applications.

  • Broadband Forum and ONF collaborate on automation and virtualization in access networks

    In yet another example of open source groups working together, the Broadband Forum and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced on Monday that they have signed an agreement to mutually drive automation and virtualization across access networks. Over the past several years, open source communities and standards development organizations (SDOs) have started to collaborate with each other in order to speed up the development of new applications and services while not duplicating each other's efforts.

  • Broadband Forum and ONF Ease the Path to Automated and Open Virtualized Access Networks

    As the broadband industry embarks on the next phase of broadband deployment, numerous new business opportunities are emerging that require rapid service instantiation, often across disparate, software-defined networks, and leveraging third-party applications. To take advantage of this untapped potential, operators are looking to interconnect different parts of their network with open source solutions and systems from various suppliers.

  • Microsoft to Reward Hackers for Finding Bugs in Open Source Election Software [Ed: This clearly spreads Microsoft propaganda. Microsoft puts back doors in election systems, so at the same time it tries to spin itself as the solution to security with its proprietary software

    Fair elections are the lifelines of democracy, but in recent years election hacking has become a hot topic worldwide.

  • Sotabench: Benchmarking Open Source Models Directly From GitHub [Ed: No, you cannot do proper studies with only data from Microsoft because it is biased by design; many FOSS projects reject proprietary software such as GitHub]

    Machine learning research resource Papers with Code last week introduced Sotabench, a free and open website created to benchmark and rate the performance of state-of-the-art open source models from GitHub. Papers with Code is an open platform that aggregates ML papers, code, and evaluation tables and metrics from sources such as arXiv and GitHub.

  • Kansai University Research: Kansai University Researcher is Awarded Prestigious Prize for the Development and Advancement of Open Source Data Mining Technology for Business and Product Marketing
  • Alfresco Named a Leader in Worldwide SaaS and Cloud-Enabled Content Applications, According to IDC MarketScape

OSS Funding: Ripple/Towo Lab and Strapi

  • Ripple invests in Swedish open source start-up Towo Labs

    Towo Labs, a Swedish startup aimed at simplifying ‘crypto self-custody’, has announced an investment from Xpring, Ripple’s developer initiative. Xpring is described as an initiative by Ripple that will invest in, incubate, acquire and provide grants to companies and projects run by entrepreneurs. [...] All open source code contributions will be subject to the normal code and security reviews of the involved repository maintainers.

  • French open-source CMS startup Strapi raises $4 million in seed funding

    Strapi, a Paris, France-based open-source CMS, raises $4M in seed funding to deliver on its vision of making content accessible to any platform while offering the only fully open-source, JavaScript-based, community-powered and 100% customizable Headless CMS which is entirely free for developers.The round was led by Accel and Stride.vc. Notable angel investors and open-source experts, Solomon Hykes (Founder of Docker), Guillermo Rauch (Founder of Cloudup, Socket.io, Next.js and Zeit.co) and Eli Collins (Ex-CTO at Cloudera), also participated in this round.

  • Headless CMS company Strapi raises $4 million

    Strapi has become quite popular in the headless CMS space, with 500,000 downloads and 250 contributors to the open-source project. The first version was released on GitHub in 2015.

Open Hardware: Ploopy, Shapeshifter, AR3 and More

  • Ploopy is an open-source trackball kit (pre-order one or build your own)

    These days there are plenty of ways to interact with computers including mice, touchpads, touchscreens, and pens (and keyboards, of course). But one option that’s largely fallen by the wayside is the trackball. While a handful of companies continue to offer “trackball mouse” accessories that are basically mice with a rolling wheel in the side, there aren’t many decent standalone options.

  • Shapeshifter – An Open Source Drum Machine

    Shapeshifter’s design is open-source, with everything available on Github for the curious musical tinkerers out there. The device is built around a PCB with only through-hole components, making assembly easy for even the least experienced enthusiasts out there. A Teensy 3.6 is then slotted into the socket on the board, providing 180MHz of grunt to run the show. It’s an excellent choice, as the Teensy platform has a huge range of libraries which make it simple to work with audio. Being open-source, not only is it a cinch to make your own, but there’s plenty of room to remix the design to your personal tastes. There’s even a breadboarding area and the capability to add an expansion card for even more possibilities. Some users have even gone so far as to add displays and filter mods to really open things up.

  • Speeding the Idea-to-Prototype Process with the Arduino Open-Source Ecosystem
  • Open-Source Arm Puts Robotics Within Reach

    In November 2017, we showed you [Chris Annin]’s open-source 6-DOF robot arm. Since then he’s been improving the arm and making it more accessible for anyone who doesn’t get to play with industrial robots all day at work. The biggest improvement is that AR2 had a closed-loop control system, and AR3 is open-loop. If something bumps the arm or it crashes, the bot will recover its previous position automatically. It also auto-calibrates itself using limit switches. AR3 is designed to be milled from aluminium or entirely 3D printed. The motors and encoders are controlled with a Teensy 3.5, while an Arduino Mega handles I/O, the grippers, and the servos. In the demo video after the break, [Chris] shows off AR3’s impressive control after a brief robotic ballet in which two AR3s move in hypnotizing unison.

  • Makr Mirror open source Raspberry Pi smart mirror

    Makr Mirror is an open source smart mirror created to provide a “customisable out of the box experience”. The smart mirror It has been launched via Kickstarter this week and is now available to back with earlybird pledges starting from $649, providing a fully finished Raspberry Pi smart mirror with shipping available throughout the United States. Watch the project video below to learn more about the Makr Mirror and its inspiration to provide a fully open source and extensible smart mirror.

  • BCN3D renews commitment to open source releasing files for Sigma & Sigmax R19 3D printers

    Releasing the news into the community, BCN3D asked RepRap pioneer Richard Horne, better known as RichRap, for his input. Deemed a “step beyond” the usual release of machine CAD files by the open source advocate, Horne says ““This release of the Sigma R19 and the Sigmax R19 source files also comes [with] an even greater gift to the open source hardware community, this being the inclusion of the designs and information that BCN3D use to manufacture, test and assemble all aspects of the machine during production.” “With this level of commitment to the open source hardware movement,” Horne adds, “it allows others to learn and further benefit from the R19 project and it’s journey from design to stable production 3D printers.”

  • Intel And AMD’s Biggest Cloud Threat May Be An Open X86 Instruction Set

    Meanwhile, academics at Berkeley created the new RISC-V (pronounced “risk-five") open source instruction set, which is being commercialized by the RISC-V Foundation. Many current and potential Arm server processor designers are evaluating the potential for RISC-V based server processors. They include some large IaaS clouds, like Alibaba Group and Google, plus some chip companies not currently in the server processor design business, like NVIDIA.

  • Open Source VR - Heads-On with HTC Vive Cosmos

    Depending on your position, VR is either dead or dying, or just waiting on that eureka technological leap to fully realise its promised potential. HTC's Vive Cosmos headset, released this month, might just be that virtual reality saviour. And we got a complete heads-on experience with it.