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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Frankenstein JVM with flavour - jlink your own JVM with OpenJDK 11

    While you can find a lot of information regarding the Java "Project Jigsaw", I could not really find a good example on "assembling" your own JVM. So I took a few minutes to figure that out. My usecase here is that someone would like to use Instana (non free tracing solution) which requires the java.instrument and jdk.attach module to be available. From an operations perspektive we do not want to ship the whole JDK in our production Docker Images, so we've to ship a modified JVM. Currently we base our images on the builds provided by AdoptOpenJDK.net, so my examples are based on those builds. You can just download and untar them to any directory to follow along.

  • KDE Craft Packager on macOS

    In Craft, to create a package, we can use craft --package after the compiling and the installing of a library or an application with given blueprint name.

    On macOS, MacDMGPackager is the packager used by Craft. The MacDylibBundleris used in MacDMGPackager to handle the dependencies.

    In this article, I’ll give a brief introduction of the two classes and the improvement which I’ve done for my GSoC project.

  • It is coming alive

    After digging for around a month and a half, I can finally do some selections with the Magnetic Lasso tool, which I wrote with utter laziness as I would say. Though it still demands a lot of work to be done, so it will be just polishing the existing code into perfection for the next one and half month.

  • Humble Book Bundle: Programmable Boards by Make Community

    If you are interested in learning more about programmable boards, such as Arduino, and are looking for a crash course, you can pick up much on the topic by not just reading about the topic but also doing some hands-on learning. You can do just that, along with paying very little to do so when you buy the Humble Book Bundle: Programmable Boards by Make Community. You’ll pay as little as $1 for books that explain getting started with IoT, Arduino projects, mBot, and more. You’ll get instruction and hands-on training in several areas. Buy the bundle and receive only the books you really need to learn more about programmable boards.

  • Building a computer - part 1

    Off-hand I think the most complex projects I've built have been complex in terms of software. For example I recently hooked up a 933Mhz radio-receiver to an ESP8266 device, then had to reverse engineer the protocol of the device I wanted to listen for. I recorded a radio-burst using an SDR dongle on my laptop, broke the transmission into 1 and 0 manually, worked out the payload and then ported that code to the ESP8266 device.

    Anyway I've decided I should do something more complex, I should build "a computer". Going old-school I'm going to stick to what I know best the Z80 microprocessor. I started programming as a child with a ZX Spectrum which is built around a Z80.

    Initially I started with BASIC, later I moved on to assembly language mostly because I wanted to hack games for infinite lives. I suspect the reason I don't play video-games so often these days is because I'm just not very good without cheating Wink

    Anyway the Z80 is a reasonably simple processor, available in a 40PIN DIP format. There are the obvious connectors for power, ground, and a clock-source to make the thing tick. After that there are pins for the address-bus, and pins for the data-bus. Wiring up a standalone Z80 seems to be pretty trivial.

  • Python Machine Learning Tutorial: Predicting Airbnb Prices
  • DevOps for introverted people
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Coding week #6
  • Week 6 Check-In
  • Week 5 Check-In

    At the start of this week, I revisited the box-into-capsule test and re-implemented a different algorithm. Instead of representing the capsule as two hemispheres and a cylinder, my mentor suggested to see it as a line segment defined the by its two endpoints. So, the algorithm finds the closest point on the box to the line segment, and then tests for intersections accordingly.

  • `make -j5 kritaflake`

    At the end of June I finished copy-on-write vector layers. From the very beginning, I have been researching into possibilities to make kritaflake implicitly sharable. In that post I mentioned the way Sean Parent uses for Photoshop, and adapted it for the derived d-pointers in Flake.

  • Working With Dictionaries In Python

    Dictionaries in pythons are a collection of key value pairs. They are very similar to JSON data type in JavaScript. Dictionaries are indexed, they can be modified and they are no ordered. This makes it very flexible and useful. Since dictionary items can be accessed with keys instead of indexes, dictionaries are widely used in external data-driven programs and apps.

  • What is a golden image?

    If you’re in quality assurance, system administration, or (believe it or not) media production, you might have heard some variation of the term gold master, golden image, or master image, and so on. It’s a term that has made its way into the collective consciousness of anyone involved in creating one perfect model and then producing many duplicates from that mold. That’s what a gold master, or golden image, is: The virtual mold from which you cast your distributable models.

    In media production, the theory is that a crew works toward the gold master. This final product is one of a kind. It looks and sounds the best a movie or an album (or whatever it is) can possibly look and sound. Copies of this master image are made, compressed, and sent out to the eager public.

    In software, a similar idea is associated with the term. Once software has been compiled and tested and re-tested, the perfect build is declared gold. No further changes are allowed, and all distributable copies are generated from this master image (this used to actually mean something, back when software was distributed on CDs or DVDs).

More in Tux Machines

Open Source platforms to now help students

The technical institutes in the State are now asked to use free and open-source software developed by a team, headed by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). The MHRD has also promoted their FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education) projects which uses tools so that students can easily use them. Recently, the MHRD made a decision that FOSSEE should be promoted amongst the student community so they can aim at reducing dependency on proprietary software in educational institutions. The MHRD Minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank too took to twitter urging students to use FLOSS tools in various languages to meet academic and research requirements. Read more

today's howtos

  • A guided tour of Linux file system types

    While it may not be obvious to the casual user, Linux file systems have evolved significantly over the last decade or so to make them more resistant to corruption and performance problems. Most Linux systems today use a file system type called ext4. The “ext” part stands for “extended” and the 4 indicates that this is the 4th generation of this file system type. Features added over time include the ability to provide increasingly larger file systems (currently as large as 1,000,000 TiB) and much larger files (up to 16 TiB), more resistance to system crashes and less fragmentation (scattering single files as chunks in multiple locations) which improves performance.

  • Testing the Linux Malware Detect.
  • Kushal Das: Remember to mark drive as removable for tails vm install

    If you are installing Tails into a VM for testing or anything else, always remember to mark the drive as a removable USB drive. Otherwise, the installation step will finish properly, but, you will get errors like the following screenshot while booting from the drive.

  • How to Set DNS Nameservers on Ubuntu 18.04

Security Leftovers

  • NSA Researchers Talk Development, Release of Ghidra SRE Tool

    The National Security Agency released its classified Ghidra software reverse-engineering (SRE) tool as open source to the cybersecurity community on April 4. NSA researchers Brian Knighton and Chris Delikat shared how Ghidra was built and the process of releasing it at Black Hat 2019. Ghidra is a framework developed by the NSA’s Research Directorate for the agency’s cybersecurity mission. It’s designed to analyze malicious code to give security pros a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems.

  • Linux Is Being Hit with Zero-Day Exploits/ Zero-Day Attacks [Ed: This is not news. If you have a system that is unpatched for months, despite many warnings, it is a risk, no matter the OS/kernel.]

    It was once the popular opinion that Linux was immune to zero-day exploits. However, even before the Equifax exploit, vulnerabilities were found in Linux distributions like Fedora and Ubuntu. In particular, back in 2016, a security researcher discovered that you could exploit a Linux system by playing a specific music file. Then, in 2017, a group of attackers used Struckshock vulnerability to carry on the attack on Equifax. These zero-day attacks are Advanced Persistent Attacks that exploit recently discovered vulnerabilities. Read on to learn more about what are zero-day exploits and how they can affect a Linux system.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and Others Launch Confidential Computing Consortium for Data Security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and others launch Confidential Computing Consortium for data security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use. Established by the Linux Foundation, the organization plans to bring together hardware vendors, developers, open source experts, and others to promote the use of confidential computing, advance common open source standards, and better protect data. “Confidential computing focuses on securing data in use. Current approaches to securing data often address data at rest (storage) and in transit (network), but encrypting data in use is possibly the most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data,” the Linux Foundation said today in a joint statement. “Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.”

Linux-driven modules to showcase new MediaTek AIoT SoCs

Innocomm is prepping an “SB30 SoM” with the new quad -A35 MediaTek i300 followed by an “SB50 SoM” with an AI-equipped, octa-core -A73 and -A53 MediaTek i500. Both modules ship with Linux/Android evaluation kits. Innocomm, which has produced NXP-based compute modules such as the i.MX8M Mini driven WB15 and i.MX8M powered WB10, will soon try on some MediaTek SoCs for size. First up is an SB30 SoM due to launch in October that will run Linux or Android on MediaTek’s 1.5GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC. In November, the company plans to introduce an SB50 SoM based on the MediaTek i500 (MT8385). Read more