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Fedora: Cockpit 198, EPEL, and Fedora Community Departure

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Red Hat
  • Cockpit 198

    Cockpit has been restyled to match the PatternFly 4 User Interface design, including the Red Hat Text and Display fonts.

    This style refresh aligns Cockpit with other web user interfaces that use PatternFly, such as OpenShift 4.

    Over time, Cockpit will be ported to actually use PatternFly 4 widgets, but this restyle allows us to change Cockpit gradually.

  • The State Of EPEL-8 For Complementing RHEL8's Packages

    Under the Fedora umbrella has been the "Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux" to complement the official RHEL packages with extra packages largely based on Fedora packages. While RHEL 8.0 launched in May, there hasn't been full support for EPEL-8 yet but it's being worked on.

    Due to the many changes from RHEL7 to RHEL8, the EPEL-8 support has been slow. The EPEL-8 bring-up is being done via a multi-phase roll-out.

  • Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator (FCAIC)

    I’ve decided to move on from my role as the Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator (FCAIC). This was not an easy decision to make. I am proud of the work I have done in Fedora over the last three years and I think I have helped the community move past many challenges. I could NEVER have done all of this without the support and assistance of the community!

    As some of you know, I have been covering for some other roles in Red Hat for almost the last year. Some of these tasks have led to some opportunities to take my career in a different direction. I am going to remain at Red Hat and on the same team with the same manager, but with a slightly expanded scope of duties. I will no longer be day-to-day on Fedora and will instead be in a consultative role as a Community Architect at Large. This is a fancy way of saying that I will be tackling helping lots of projects with various issues while also working on some specific strategic objectives.

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Security: One More Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day, New FOSS Patches, Major Metapackage Makeover in Kali and Securing Crypto Wallets

  • One more Steam Windows Client Local Privilege Escalation 0day

    Not long ago I published an article about Steam vulnerability. I received a lot of feedback. But Valve didn’t say a single word, HackerOne sent a huge letter and, mostly, kept silence. Eventually things escalated with Valve and I got banned by them on HackerOne — I can no longer participate in their vulnerability rejection program (the rest of H1 is still available though).

    You can read the story in more detail in previous article, here is a couple of words about current situation.

    And it’s sad and simple — Valve keeps failing. Last patch, that should have solved the problem, can be easily bypassed (https://twitter.com/general_nfs/status/1162067274443833344) so the vulnerability still exists. Yes, I’ve checked, it works like a charm.

    But this article is not about an old vulnerability, it’s about new one. Since Valve decided to read a public report instead of private report one more time, I won’t take that pleasure away from them.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (nginx), openSUSE (ImageMagick and putty), Red Hat (Ansible, atomic-openshift-web-console, ceph, and qemu-kvm-rhev), SUSE (kvm, libssh2_org, postgresql96, qemu, and wavpack), and Ubuntu (libzstd and openjpeg2).

  • Major Metapackage Makeover

    With our 2019.3 Kali release imminent, we wanted to take a quick moment to discuss one of our more significant upcoming changes: our selection of metapackages. These alterations are designed to optimize Kali, reduce ISO size, and better organize metapackages as we continue to grow. Before we get into what’s new, let’s briefly recap what a metapackage is. A metapackage is a package that does not contain any tools itself, but rather is a dependency list of normal packages (or other metapackages). This allows us to group related tools together. For instance, if you want to be able to access every wireless tool, simply install the kali-tools-wireless metapackage.

  • Securing Your Crypto Wallet

    When it came time to create my CryptocurrencyOS, based on Linux Mint I wanted to solve some practical user and security issues. The end result was for people to have their own crypto wallets in a secure, opensource, environment and encourage more adoption of cryptocurrency. I applied some of my experience with some of the products I developed for compevo and Techrich. The first problem is that a lot of people don’t even know how to find or download a wallet (at least safely, since there are a lot of fake / malware wallets that steal people’s coins). If they don’t know how to avoid the above, then how would they be able to secure their computer?

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