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FreeBSD 11.3

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE Announcement

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE. This is the fourth release of the stable/11 branch.

  • FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE Available

    FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE is now available. Please be sure to check the Release Notes and Release Errata before installation for any late-breaking news and/or issues with 11.3. More information about FreeBSD releases can be found on the Release Information page.

  • FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE Release Notes

    This document contains the release notes for FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE. It describes recently added, changed, or deleted features of FreeBSD. It also provides some notes on upgrading from previous versions of FreeBSD.

    This distribution of FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE is a release distribution. It can be found at https://www.FreeBSD.org/releases/ or any of its mirrors. More information on obtaining this (or other) release distributions of FreeBSD can be found in the “Obtaining FreeBSD” appendix to the FreeBSD Handbook.

    All users are encouraged to consult the release errata before installing FreeBSD. The errata document is updated with “late-breaking” information discovered late in the release cycle or after the release. Typically, it contains information on known bugs, security advisories, and corrections to documentation. An up-to-date copy of the errata for FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE can be found on the FreeBSD Web site.

    This document describes the most user-visible new or changed features in FreeBSD since 11.2-RELEASE. In general, changes described here are unique to the 11.3-STABLE branch unless specifically marked as MERGED features.

    Typical release note items document recent security advisories issued after 11.2-RELEASE, new drivers or hardware support, new commands or options, major bug fixes, or contributed software upgrades. They may also list changes to major ports/packages or release engineering practices. Clearly the release notes cannot list every single change made to FreeBSD between releases; this document focuses primarily on security advisories, user-visible changes, and major architectural improvements.

  • FreeBSD 11.3 Officially Released With Random Improvements, Updated Components

    FreeBSD 11.3 brings a number of updated user-space applications, libxo support has been enabled for various applications, XZ 5.2.4 has been updated, a Lua loader has been merged, LLVM Clang 8.0 is now available along with other LLVM 8.0.0 components, various networking driver updates, a ZFS file-system fix, and other changes. And, yes, there is a random driver update for improving the performance during the expensive task of reseeding the pool.

FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE Released

  • FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE Released, Which comes with many Improvements

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.3-RELEASE on July 09th 2019.

    This is the fourth release of the stable release of FreeBSD 11 branch.

    [...]

    The kernel will now log the jail ID when logging a process exit.

    Several feature additions and updates to userland applications.

    Several network driver firmware updates.

    Warnings for features deprecated in future releases will now be printed on all FreeBSD versions.

    Warnings have been added for IPSec algorithms deprecated in RFC 8221.

    Deprecation warnings have been added for weaker algorithms when creating geli providers.

FreeBSD 11.3 officially released with enhancements

  • FreeBSD 11.3 officially released with enhancements and updated apps

    With an upgraded kernel and userland, FreeBSD 11.3 is now available for the general audience.

    Starting with an introduction, FreeBSD is an operating system based on the Berkley Software Distribution?s UNIX. The OS is also known for its advanced networking, security, and compatibility. Accordingly, alongside regular users, you?ll find computer scientists, ISPs, and researchers using this operating system as well.

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