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Red Hat's Statements on Being Bought by IBM (Now Official)

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  • Unlocking the true potential of hybrid cloud with Red Hat partners

    Today, we announced that IBM’s landmark acquisition of Red Hat has closed and shared our vision for how our two companies will move forward together.

    You’ve heard that IBM is committed to preserving Red Hat’s independence, neutrality, culture and industry partnerships, and that Red Hat’s unwavering commitment to open source remains unchanged.

    There is a key part of that statement I want to focus on—partnerships.

    IBM has made a significant investment to acquire Red Hat, and respects that Red Hat wouldn’t be Red Hat without our partner ecosystem. Partners open more doors for open source than we can alone and are vital to our success.

  • Red Hat and IBM: Accelerating the adoption of open source

    Today, IBM finalized its acquisition of Red Hat. Moving forward, Red Hat will operate as a distinct unit within IBM, and I couldn't be more excited—not only for what today represents in the history of two storied technology companies, but what it means for the future of the industry, for our customers, and for open source.

    Red Hat's acquisition by IBM represents an unparalleled milestone for open source itself. It signals validation of community-driven innovation and the value that open source brings to users.

  • IBM Closes Landmark Acquisition of Red Hat for $34 Billion; Defines Open, Hybrid Cloud Future

    IBM (NYSE:IBM) and Red Hat announced today that they have closed the transaction under which IBM acquired all of the issued and outstanding common shares of Red Hat for $190.00 per share in cash, representing a total equity value of approximately $34 billion.

    The acquisition redefines the cloud market for business. Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud technologies are now paired with the unmatched scale and depth of IBM’s innovation and industry expertise, and sales leadership in more than 175 countries. Together, IBM and Red Hat will accelerate innovation by offering a next-generation hybrid multicloud platform. Based on open source technologies, such as Linux and Kubernetes, the platform will allow businesses to securely deploy, run and manage data and applications on-premises and on private and multiple public clouds.

  • Q&A: IBM’s Landmark Acquisition of Red Hat

    Paul: Red Hat is an enterprise software company with an open source development model. A fundamental tenet of that model is that everything we do, from new practices that we learn to new technologies that we develop, goes back to the upstream community. By joining forces with IBM, our reach into customers will dramatically increase so we’ll be in a position to drive open enterprise technology a lot further. As for IBM, we’ve been partners for quite some time, but now existing IBM customers will have even more direct access to next-generation open source-based technologies that are at the cornerstone of hybrid cloud innovation.

  • Jim Whitehurst email to Red Hatters on Red Hat + IBM acquisition closing

    Last October, we announced our intention to join forces with IBM, with the aim of becoming the world’s top hybrid cloud provider. Since then, the promise IBM chairman, president, and CEO Ginni Rometty and I made has not changed. In fact, our commitment to that vision has grown - Red Hat will remain a distinct unit in IBM as we work to help customers deliver any app, anywhere, realizing the true value of the hybrid cloud. This morning, we can share that the most significant tech acquisition of 2019 has officially closed and we can now begin moving forward.

    We will be hosting an all-hands company meeting today (Tuesday, July 9) where you will hear from me, Ginni, Paul Cormier and IBM senior vice president of Cloud and Cognitive Software, Arvind Krishna. Details on logistics to follow; I hope you will join us.

    Since we announced the acquisition, I’ve been having conversations with our customers, partners, open source community members and more Red Hatters than I can count (I’ve been following memo-list as well!). What struck me most from those conversations was the passion. It’s passion not just for a company, but for what we do and how we do it—the open source way. That’s not going to change.

  • IBM Acquires Red Hat For $34 Billion

    IBM today closed the acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion, marking one of the biggest acquisition of any open source company.

Responses From Linux Sites and Fedora

  • IBM Has Just Wiped Clean Red Hat’s Position on Software Patents

    Red Hat could sell itself to Microsoft and even considered that. We’re thankful that this never happened. But Red Hat’s main casualty will be its policy on patents. Since IBM calls all the shots it’s safe to assume that Red Hat’s staff has become or will become a major booster of software patents (or at best passive). We also envision IBM putting a lot of pressure on new joiners (from Red Hat) to apply for software patents, maybe ‘spiced up’ with buzzwords such as "hey hi" (AI) so as to dodge 35 U.S.C. § 101. It’s important for IBM to show up at the top of U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) ladders. IBM also lobbies for software patents in Europe, so Red Hat is perhaps becoming a threat to Europe — even if only by extension.

  • Preserving the Red Hat developer experience

    In the months since the Red Hat acquisition by IBM was announced, I have been asked numerous times if this deal changes things for Red Hat’s Developer Program and Developer Tools group.

    My answer then and now is “no.”

    As has been stated elsewhere, Red Hat will remain independent because IBM appreciates our unswerving dedication to open source, our open culture, and our neutrality. Neither IBM nor Red Hat has any desire to change these foundational values.

    My group, which covers developer evangelism, the developer program and our developer tools, will remain independent from IBM’s developer group.

  • IBM Completes Its Acquisition Of Red Hat

    With this $34 billion (USD) acquisition, IBM says they will still let Red Hat retain its independence and neutrality, continue the same development model, Jim Whitehurst will continue to lead Red Hat, and IBM will maintain the existing Red Hat headquarters/facilities/brands/practices.

  • IBM Closes Landmark Acquisition of Red Hat for $34 Billion; Defines Open, Hybrid Cloud Future
  • IBM Closes Red Hat Acquisition, Kaidan 0.4.0 Released, Android Apps Can Track You Even If You Deny Permission, Debian Edu 10 "Buster" Now Available and MIT Researchers Create New AI Programming Language

    IBM closes its acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion. From the press release: "The acquisition redefines the cloud market for business. Red Hat's open hybrid cloud technologies are now paired with the unmatched scale and depth of IBM's innovation and industry expertise, and sales leadership in more than 175 countries. Together, IBM and Red Hat will accelerate innovation by offering a next-generation hybrid multicloud platform. Based on open source technologies, such as Linux and Kubernetes, the platform will allow businesses to securely deploy, run and manage data and applications on-premises and on private and multiple public clouds." In addition, the release notes that IBM will preserve Red Hat's independence and neutrality, and also that "Red Hat's unwavering commitment to open source remains unchanged".

  • Miller: Red Hat, IBM, and Fedora

    Fedora project leader Matthew Miller reassures the community that IBM's acquisition of Red Hat, which just closed, will not affect Fedora.

    [...]

    If you have questions or would like to learn more about today’s news, I encourage you to review the materials below. For any questions not answered here, please feel free to contact us. Red Hat CTO Chris Wright will host an online Q&A session in the coming days where you can ask questions you may have about what the acquisition means for Red Hat and our involvement in open source communities. Details will be announced on the Red Hat blog.

  • Fedora Magazine: Red Hat, IBM, and Fedora

    Red Hat will continue to be a champion for open source, just as it always has, and valued projects like Fedora that will continue to play a role in driving innovation in open source technology. IBM is committed to Red Hat’s independence and role in open source software communities. We will continue this work and, as always, we will continue to help upstream projects be successful and contribute to welcoming new members and maintaining the project.

Slashdot and corporate media

  • IBM Closes Its $34 Billion Acquisition of Red Hat

    IBM closed its $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat, the companies announced Tuesday.

  • IBM closes its $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat

    IBM closed its $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat, the companies announced Tuesday.

    Shares of IBM were down less than 1% in late-morning trading.

    The deal was originally announced in October, when the companies said IBM would buy all shares in Red Hat for $190 each in cash.

    The acquisition of Red Hat, an open-source, enterprise software maker, marks the close of IBM's largest deal ever. It's one of the biggest in U.S. tech history. Excluding the AOL-Time Warner merger, it follows the $67 billion deal between Dell and EMC in 2016 and JDS Uniphase's $41 billion acquisition of optical-component supplier SDL in 2000.

    Under the deal, Red Hat will now be a unit of IBM's hybrid cloud division, according to the original announcement. The companies said Red Hat's CEO, Jim Whitehurst, would join IBM's senior management team and report to CEO Ginni Rometty.

A couple more assorted articles

  • IBM closes $34 billion Red Hat acquisition: Now it's time to deliver

    IBM has closed its $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat, vowed to keep its new unit independent, deliver innovative hybrid cloud stacks and grow. Now all IBM CEO Ginni Rometty has to do is execute since the Red Hat purchase will define her tenure.

    For customers of both companies, the next big milestone will be to see the roadmap for hybrid cloud integrations that can compete with VMware in enterprises. In addition, IBM has pledged to keep Red Hat neutral, open source focused and led by current management and CEO Jim Whitehurst.

    What IBM is trying to do is use its scale to turbo charge Red Hat's growth as well as bolster its own cloud unit. Red Hat's platform will instantly become global.

  • IBM wraps up purchase of Linux specialist in $34bn deal

    IBM said on Tuesday that it has closed its $34bn acquisition of software company Red Hat as it looks to ramp up its cloud computing business.

    Underscoring the drive into high-margin businesses, IBM in October agreed to buy Red Hat, the company’s biggest acquisition in its more than 100-year history.

    Ginni Rometty, IBM CEO since 2012, has steered the company towards faster-growing segments such as cloud, software and services and away from traditional hardware products, but not without a bumpy journey. The newer areas of focus have sometimes underwhelmed investors.

    The company, which won approval for the purchase from EU regulators in late June and US regulators in May, agreed to pay $190 a share for Red Hat, representing a 63% premium.

    Founded in 1993, Red Hat specialises in Linux operating systems, the most popular type of open-source software and an alternative to proprietary software made by Microsoft. IBM has faced years of revenue declines as it transitions from its legacy computer hardware business into new technology products and services.

    Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst and his management team will remain in place, and Whitehurst will join IBM’s senior management team and report to Rometty. IBM will maintain Red Hat’s headquarters in Raleigh, North Carolina, as well as its facilities, brands and practices. Red Hat will operate as a distinct unit within IBM.

More on IBM and EPEL Plans

  • IBM officially acquires Red Hat for $34 billion -- Linux distros are unaffected

    IBM has closed its acquisition of Red Hat following the statement of intent back in October. Following the $34 billion deal, Red Hat will operate as a distinct unit within IBM -- and will be reported as part of IBM's Cloud and Cognitive Software segment.

    For IBM, the deal means fully embracing open source as it looks to accelerate its business model within the enterprise. For Red Hat, it means expanding its client base and working with a big player in the enterprise cloud business.

  • EPEL-8 Production Layout

    TL; DR:
    EPEL-8 will have a multi-phase roll-out into production.
    EPEL-8.0 will build using existing grobisplitter in order to use a ‘flattened’ build system without modules.
    EPEL-8.1 will start in staging without grobisplitter and using default modules via mock.
    The staging work will allow for continual development changes in koji, ‘ursa-prime’, and MBS functionality to work without breaking Fedora 31 or initial EPEL-8.0 builds.
    EPEL-8.1 will look to be ready by November 2019 after Fedora 31 around the time that RHEL-8.1 may release (if it uses a 6 month cadence.)

Where do IBM and Red Hat go from here?

  • Where do IBM and Red Hat go from here?

    IBM acquired Red Hat for a cool $34 billion. It's IBM hope that Red Hat will help IBM's annual revenue growth within the next five years. That growth will come from the continued rise of the hybrid cloud. How will they do that? The same way Red Hat has always grown: By embracing the open-source software approach.

    Specifically, as Paul Cormier, Red Hat's president of products and technologies, said in a conference call, it will continue moving forward with the hybrid cloud: "Today what we start on is that journey on steroids."

IBM Bets $34 Billion That Red Hat Can Help It Catch Amazon

  • IBM Bets $34 Billion That Red Hat Can Help It Catch Amazon and Microsoft

    IBM has tried multiple ways to stay relevant in the technology world. But it has often been outgunned by rivals like Amazon and Microsoft.

    On Tuesday, IBM outlined its latest strategy: using its $34 billion purchase of Red Hat, the largest ever acquisition of a business software company, to get a big piece of the lucrative cloud computing market.

    The deal is a high-stakes bet for IBM and its leader, Ginni Rometty. Amazon and Microsoft dominate the cloud computing industry, with Google a distant third. (In China, Alibaba is the clear leader.) They have the internet skills and the deep pockets to spend many billions a year building the vast data centers that power the cloud, helping to protect their lead. But their grasp has raised concerns from customers about being dependent on a single provider.

Sean Michael Kerner's article

  • IBM Closes Red Hat Acquisition Pledging to Keep Enterprise Software Separate

    $34B deal is now done and with it comes renewed questions about how IBM will influence and control Red Hat's enterprise software portfolio.

    IBM announced on July 9 that it had formally closed its' largest acquisition ever, picking up enterprise Linux vendor Red Hat in a deal valued at $34 billion.

    With the deal now done, questions about how IBM will handle Red Hat's enterprise application software portfolio and direction moving forward can now be officially answered. In a press conference, Arvind Krishna, SVP, Cloud and Cognitive Software at IBM and Paul Cormier, President Products and Technologies at Red Hat were peppered with questions about what will happen now.

    Krishna said that Red Hat will remain neutral and will continue to work with its partners that might well be competitors to IBM.

IBM Acquires Linux Developer Red Hat For $34 Billion

  • IBM Acquires Linux Developer Red Hat For $34 Billion

    IBM on Tuesday closed the deal that saw it acquire open source software products leader and Linux developer Red Hat Inc. for $34 billion.

    IBM first announced its intent to acquire Red Hat in October 2018. On May 3, the U.S. Department of Justice concluded its review of IBM's Red Hat acquisition, and by posing no objections basically approved IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat.

    Red Hat will operate as a distinct unit within IBM and will become part of IBM’s Cloud and Cognitive Software segment. It will maintain its independence and neutrality, insists IBM.

    Current CEO Jim Whitehurst will continue to lead Red Hat. He will join IBM’s senior management team and will report to CEO Ginni Rometty.

Later press coverage about IBM-Red Hat

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