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Linux 5.2

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  • Linux 5.2
    So I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because
    of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last
    week, and with spotty internet for a few days before that [*].
    
    But there really doesn't seem to be any reason for another rc, since
    it's been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but
    they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming
    merge window. Part of it may be due to the July 4th week, of course,
    but whatever - I'll take the quiet week as a good sign.
    
    So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for
    another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release
    timing.
    
    There's no particular area that stands out there - the changes are so
    small that the sppended shortlog really is the best description of
    last week. A few small random changes all over: drivers,
    architectures, filesystem, mm, ...
    
    So with this, the merge window for 5.2 is open.
    
               Linus
  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds has announced today the release and general availability of the Linux 5.2 kernel series, a major release that adds several new features, updated drivers, and many improvements.

    After seven RCs (Release Candidates), the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now available and it comes with some very interesting features and enhancements. However, before we dive into what's new, you should know that this release is not a long-term supported (LTS) branch, which means that you stick with your current LTS kernel instead.

    "I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last week," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement. "So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing."

  • Linux 5.2 Kernel Released As The "Bobtail Squid"

    Adding to the excitement of 7 July is the release of the Linux 5.2 stable kernel, which also means the opening of the Linux 5.3 merge window.

    Linux 5.2.0 made it out today on time without having any extra release candidates for this summer 2019 kernel release. This kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window and its series of release candidates that then should debut as stable in September.

    See our Linux 5.2 feature overview for those wondering about all of the exciting features of this new kernel.

By Corbet of LWN

  • The 5.2 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.2 kernel. He originally planned for an rc8 this week, rather than 5.2, due to his travel schedule, but was pleasantly surprised at how calm things have been.

The Best Features Of Linux 5.2

Update Linux Kernel In Ubuntu

Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released

  • Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released For Linux Enthusiasts

    Kernel 5.2 also continues to add more speculative execution bug fixes for Intel CPUs. There are new GPU drivers as well for ARM Mali devices.

    Apart from these changes, kernel 5.2 comes with the usual bug fixes for different drivers, better hardware support for new and older hardware, and better display performance.

Linux "Kernel 5.2 Is Out"

Sparky update

  • [Sparky] Linux kernel 5.2

    The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.2 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

    Arriving pretty much bang on schedule, the Linux kernel 5.2 release was announced to the world with little of Linus Torvalds’ usual fanfare.

    Instead, the Linux founder opted for a quiet introduction when announcing the update on the Linux Kernel Mailing List.

    He writes: “…despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing”.

    Each and every update to the Linux kernel, be it big or small, brings a stack of welcome improvements, drivers, hardware support, graphics compatibility and more. Linux Kernel 5.2, dubbed the “Bobtail Squid” (blame Linus’ scuba diving hobby the moniker), is no exception.

Simon Sharwood writes for CRN

  • Double delight for Linux lovers as kernel 5.2 and Debian 10 debut

    The weekend has given Linux users two big new releases to contemplate!

    Those who like new cuts of the kernel have version 5.2 to consider. Linus Torvalds signed it off on Monday, Australian time.

    The biggest feature in 5.2 is probably support for Intel’s forthcoming Comet Lake architecture, which will power the tenth generation of its Core desktop and mobile CPUs due. The new silicon is due to ship late in 2019 and appear in products early the next year. Linux 5.2 also includes many tweaks that improve its performance on laptops.

    The kernel also now supports a handful of extra ARM-powered single-board computers.

    The other big new release is Debian 10 “Buster”, which officially debuted on Sunday 7 July, Australian time. But this cut of Debian had actually already been available since 25 June as part of the new version of Raspbian OS, the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s preferred OS for its single board computers.

    The Foundation described Buster as offering “no huge differences” compared to its predecessor. “In a sad reflection of the way the world is nowadays, most of the differences are security changes designed to make Buster harder to hack,” wrote Simon Long, a senior principal software engineer at the Pi Foundation.

By: Zohaib Ahsan

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 released, here is what’s new

    Despite the busy schedule of Linus Torvalds, we’re still getting a significant release in Linux Kernel 5.2 instead of just a release candidate.

    In the original news source, the king of the Linux world, Linus Torvalds, has claimed that he was possibly going to drop another release candidate as he was having internet problems for a few days and then got busy with his travels. Luckily, Linus didn’t stick to his plan owing to the lack of pull requests since rc7 and the fact that there seemed to be no real need for another release candidate. Thus, the announcement was made for the release of Linux Kernel 5.2, codenamed Bobtail Squid.

    [...]

    The key highlights of this release are new drivers, extended hardware support, performance improvements, and security fixes. However, Linux Kernel 5.2 is a mainline version, which is usually not suitable for mass deployments. Accordingly, FOSSLinux suggests its readers wait for Linux Kernel 5.2.1 to drop before upgrading their kernels.

CNX Software on Linux 5.2 Release

Slashdot has the news 'only' one week late

  • What's New in Linux 5.2?

    Linux 5.2 has been released. This release includes Sound Open Firmware, a project that brings open source firmware to DSP audio devices; open firmware for many Intel products is also included. This release also improves the Pressure Stall Information resource monitoring to make it usable by Android; the mount API has been redesigned with new syscalls; the BFQ I/O scheduler has gained some performance improvements; a new CLONE_PIDFD flag lets clone(2) return pidfs usable by pidfd_send_signal(2); Ext4 has gained support for case-insensitive name lookups; there is also a new device mapper target that simulates a device that has failing sectors and/or read failures; open source drivers for the ARM Mali t4xx and newer 6xx/7xx have been added. Many other new drivers, features and changes can be found in the changelog.

A couple more later articles

  • Linux 5.2 rolls out with Sound Open Firmware and Comet Lake support

    Kernel Kitten here, defender of the Linux kernel, commander of the Kitten Army, sworn to protect Commander Torvalds' intellectual property, and look dead cute while we do it.

    We cats aren't designed for summer. All we want to do is try and hide from the sun as much as possible. It starts with leaving the back door open to give us options, but will they? Oh no. Typical.

    Anyway, I've stepped away from the battalion in order to give you details of the latest updates, so hopefully, in line with my new calm, empathetic, zen persona, I'll be able to keep my temper and get on with telling you what you need to know for once.

  • Linux 5.2 releases with inclusion of Sound Open Firmware project, new mount API, improved pressure stall information and more

    Two days ago, Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux 5.2 in his usual humorous way, describing it as a ‘Bobtail Squid’. The release has new additions like the inclusion of the Sound Open Firmware (SOF) project, improved pressure stall information, new mount API, significant performance improvements in the BFQ I/O scheduler, new GPU drivers, optional support for case-insensitive names in ext4 and more. The earlier version, Linux 5.1 was released exactly two months ago.

    Torvalds says, “there really doesn’t seem to be any reason for another rc, since it’s been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming merge window. So despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing.”

    Linux 5.2 also kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window.

Late coverage today by Marius Nestor of kernel release

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Series Is Now Ready for Mass Deployments, Upgrade Now

    Released earlier this month, the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now ready for mass deployments as the first point releases are out, marking the branch as stable on the kernel.org website.
    Linux kernel 5.2 is a major release adding several exciting new features and improvements, including an open-source firmware to support DSP audio devices, new open-source GPU drivers for ARM Mali devices, a new file system mount API, support for case-insensitive names in the EXT4 file system, as well as better resource monitoring for Android.

    It also brings performance improvements to the BFQ I/O scheduler, a new device mapper "dust" target designed to simulate devices with failing sectors and read failures, a freezer controller for cgroups v2 for freeing up resources, and a CLONE_PIDFD flag to clone(2) for fetching PIDs when creating processes usable by pidfd_send_signal(2).

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More in Tux Machines

GNU Linux-libre 5.8

  • GNU Linux-libre 5.8-gnu
    GNU Linux-libre 5.8-gnu cleaning-up scripts, cleaned-up sources, and
    cleaning-up logs (including tarball signatures) are now available from
    our git-based release archive git://linux-libre.fsfla.org/releases.git/
    tags {scripts,sources,logs}/v5.8-gnu.
    
    Tarballs and incremental patches are still getting compressed; when
    ready, they are all going to be at published along with patches at
    <https://www.fsfla.org/selibre/linux-libre/download/releases/5.8-gnu/>.
    
    
    There haven't been any changes to the deblobbing scripts since 5.8-rc7
    last weekend.
    
    This was quite a big release.  New drivers that required cleaning up
    were for Atom ISP Video, MediaTek 7663 USB and 7915 PCIe and Realtek
    8723DE WiFi, Renesas PCI xHCI, HabanaLabs Gaudi coprocessor, Enhanced
    Asynchronous Sample Rate Converter, Maxim Integrated MAX98390 Speaker
    Aimplifier, Microsemi ZL38060 Connected Home Audio Processor, and I2C
    EEPROM Slave.  Drivers for Adreno GPU, HabanaLabs Goya coprocessor, x86
    Touchscreen, vt6656 and btbcm, and various documentation files needed
    adjustments to their cleaning-up details.
    
    
    I've also made some adjustments to enable the use of deblob-check to
    verify full tarballs using Python or Perl rather than GNU awk or GNU
    sed.  The order of regexp alternatives matters in Python and Perl
    regular expression engines, and some constructs lead to exponential
    backtracking.  Those that affected looking for blobs (e.g. -l, -B) have
    been fixed, so now checks for blobs without context make steady progress
    even with backtracking engines; GNU awk is still tens of times faster,
    but Python and Perl will run to completion with as little as a few tens
    of MBs, whereas GNU awk takes a couple of GBs.  The details are in
    comments in deblob-check, under 'top mem'.
    
    GNU sed, that long ago was fastest and leanest, was retested, and
    verified to now explode to a couple of tens of GBs of memory use,
    running some 4x slower than GNU awk.  Maybe that's something that GNU
    sed developers would like to look into and see whether there's something
    wrong in their code, or in ours?
    
    
    As for deblob-check -C, that still won't run to completion on full Linux
    tarballs when using the Python or Perl engines.  There's presumably
    still something involving exponential backtracking in the context
    patterns.  Alas, I haven't got as far as fixing those in time for this
    release.  This is something that contributors with some regexp
    knowledge, or interest in learning, might be able to help with, without
    getting into the innards of our deblobbing monster scripts.  Please get
    in touch if you'd like to help.
    
    Another thing I could use some help with is some means to avoid
    introducing regexps prone to exponential backtracking when using perl or
    python.  I imagine there might be some code that identifies common
    pitfalls, that we might be able to use, but my web searches were
    unfruitful.
    
    
    For up-to-the-minute news, join us on #linux-libre of irc.gnu.org
    (Freenode), or follow me (@lxoliva) on Twister <http://twister.net.co/>,
    Secure Scuttlebutt, GNU social at social.libreplanet.org, Diaspora* at
    pod.libreplanetbr.org or pump.io at identi.ca.  Check the link in the
    signature for direct links.
    
    
    Be Free! with GNU Linux-libre.
    
    
    What is GNU Linux-libre?
    ------------------------
    
      GNU Linux-libre is a Free version of the kernel Linux (see below),
      suitable for use with the GNU Operating System in 100% Free
      GNU/Linux-libre System Distributions.
      http://www.gnu.org/distros/
    
      It removes non-Free components from Linux, that are disguised as
      source code or distributed in separate files.  It also disables
      run-time requests for non-Free components, shipped separately or as
      part of Linux, and documentation pointing to them, so as to avoid
      (Free-)baiting users into the trap of non-Free Software.
      http://www.fsfla.org/anuncio/2010-11-Linux-2.6.36-libre-debait
    
      Linux-libre started within the gNewSense GNU/Linux distribution.
      It was later adopted by Jeff Moe, who coined its name, and in 2008
      it became a project maintained by FSF Latin America.  In 2012, it
      became part of the GNU Project.
    
      The GNU Linux-libre project takes a minimal-changes approach to
      cleaning up Linux, making no effort to substitute components that
      need to be removed with functionally equivalent Free ones.
      Nevertheless, we encourage and support efforts towards doing so.
      http://libreplanet.org/wiki/LinuxLibre:Devices_that_require_non-free_firmware
    
      Our mascot is Freedo, a light-blue penguin that has just come out
      of the shower.  Although we like penguins, GNU is a much greater
      contribution to the entire system, so its mascot deserves more
      promotion.  See our web page for their images.
      http://linux-libre.fsfla.org/
    
    What is Linux?
    --------------
    
      Linux is a clone of the Unix kernel [...]
    
    (snipped from Documentation/admin-guide/README.rst)
    
    -- 
    Alexandre Oliva, happy hacker
    https://FSFLA.org/blogs/lxo/
    Free Software Activist
    GNU Toolchain Engineer
    
  • GNU Linux-libre 5.8 Required A Lot Of Deblobbing

    He also noted that for the scripts they use in purifying the kernel, a transition is underway for using Python and Perl rather than GNU awk or Sed. GNU Awk is much faster for the GNU Linux-libre purposes but consumes several GB of RAM where as Python/Perl can complete in "a few tens of MBs." GNU Sed meanwhile appears to be performing slower than in the past for their deblob checking.

  • GNU Linux-Libre 5.8 Kernel Arrives for Those Seeking 100% Freedom for Their PCs

    Alexandre Oliva announced today the general availability of the GNU Linux-libre 5.8 kernel for those seeking 100% freedom for their personal computers. Based on the recently released Linux 5.8 kernel series, the GNU Linux-libre 5.8 kernel is here to deblob any proprietary code and drivers to allow anyone who doesn’t want to use proprietary software on their personal computer to install a libre, 100% free kernel. As you know, Linux kernel 5.8 is one of the biggest releases of all time, so the GNU Linux-libre kernel developers had a lot of work deblobbing new drivers that required cleaning. Deblobbed drivers include Atom ISP Video, MediaTek 7663 USB and 7915 PCIe, Realtek 8723DE Wi-Fi, Renesas PCI xHCI, HabanaLabs Gaudi co-processor, Enhanced Asynchronous Sample Rate Converter, Maxim Integrated MAX98390 Speaker Amplifier, Microsemi ZL38060 Connected Home Audio Processor, and I2C EEPROM Slave.

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

today's howtos

Games: FAudio, Wine Staging, Space Haven and More

  • FNA and FAudio get a 20.08 release, with FNA3D and Vulkan getting closer

    Game porter and software developer Ethan Lee announced the 20.08 releases of both of FNA and FAudio, as work continues on the newer FNA3D. What are they? FNA is an accuracy-focused XNA4 reimplementation for open platforms with it being used by a ton of games including the likes of: Celeste, Dust: An Elysian Tail, Full Metal Furies, Owlboy and a plenty more. While FAudio is accuracy-focused XAudio reimplementation for open platforms, which is used for a number of games and also by the Wine / Proton compatibility layers. For FNA, it was quite a quiet release as the majority of their work is going into bringing up FNA3D which will soon be merged in with FNA directly. They simply upgraded to the new FAudio, removed some dllmaps for iOS/tvOS due to macOS ARM and removed some dead code elsewhere in 'ModelReader' which 'should mildly improve load performance'.

  • You can now support Wine Staging directly on Patreon

    Wine Staging, the highly experimental area where all the latest (and often not "greatest") code comes in for Wine testing now has a Patreon so you can support it directly. It's perhaps not as well known as the normal Wine project or Valve's fork with Proton but it is an important project itself. Containing a set of patches that are applied on top of the main development branch of Wine, the idea is to provide experimental features and fixes faster in a way that users can grab and test that eventually get upstreamed into the main Wine project once they're ready.

  • Aliens and enemy ships weren't enough for Space Haven so now there's space hazards too

    Space Haven is an Early Access game that blends together elements of FTL, RimWorld and other such building and survival sims to create a promising mix of space exploration and people management. After entering Early Access in May following a successful Alpha period for backers of their Kickstarter campaign, Bugbyte continue to expand the gameplay systems. It wasn't enough to deal with space pirates, ship to ship combat and aliens that pinch your crew members and put them into cocoons—you now have to deal with Space Hazards like: Solar Flares, Micrometeoroids, Siren Worlds (they mess with crew brains) and Nebulae to add a little more variety to your exploration.

  • Aloof looks like a wonderful feature-filled upcoming puzzle-battler

    Something of a recent discovery is Aloof, an in-development puzzle-battler somewhat inspired by the likes of Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo and Puyo Puyo Tetris with its own unique take on it. According to the full description of the game, you summon and defend small islands all the while you build combos against your opponent. What makes it different is that the puzzle pieces don't descend by themselves and you can even move up, you can also flush them all away. They said the game ' isn't about zoning out. It's about responding to your opponent, taking your time to think and move fast when you can'. [...] Sounds like it's going to be ridiculously feature-filled too. They're planning a full campaign that can be played solo or in co-op, there's going to be local and online competitive multiplayer, the ability to play it offline while also searching for an online opponent, multiple win conditions and of course full support of Linux.

  • Arcane Fortune is a grand strategy empire building game you can play in your terminal

    Sounds like it's going to be ridiculously feature-filled too. They're planning a full campaign that can be played solo or in co-op, there's going to be local and online competitive multiplayer, the ability to play it offline while also searching for an online opponent, multiple win conditions and of course full support of Linux.

  • Half-Life: Absolute Zero mimics Half-Life's original vibe, run it on Linux with Xash3D FWG

    The original Half-Life turned out to look and feel rather different than what originally shown before release. This fan project seeks to give players a different experience more inline with that original design. [...] I've tried the above instructions and can report that things work rather well. I was able to play for a while and progress without any issues. Now, Absolute Zero isn't quite finished yet and the game is still unbeatable as of the time of writing. It's the mod team's hope that things will be done by the end of October. Still, speaking as someone who has played through Half-Life a few times, it's really interesting to see this alternate visiion for the game.

  • Summer camp building gets a little supernatural in the upcoming Camp Canyonwood

    Coming from the same team as We Need To Go Deeper, Deli Interactive LLC have announced Camp Canyonwood which looks like it puts a quirky spin on building up a summer camp. What can we expect from it? Well, you're going to be responsible for building the camp and looking after your visitors. Their fun, education and safety lies in your hands and things might go bump in the night. I'm getting a bit of a Don't Starve vibe from this. [...] Speaking to the developer on Steam, they confirmed it will be supporting Linux.

  • With less than a month to go there's a new Crusader Kings III dev video

    This diary explains more about character portraits and how they change over time. It sounds pretty fun and has more depth to it than the previous game, with each character having a DNA stream that determines their appearance based on their parents. Character features change over time due to age too along with their lifestyle and any diseases. It also goes over changes made to the vassal contract system and how user testing has helped along development. [...] At release I'm hoping to take a look at it, from the perspective of someone new to it who struggled a lot with the previous entry. Thanks to the effort Paradox has put into the tutorial and help systems, it sounds like it won't be so overwhelming to get into it.

  • X4: Foundations update 3.30 arrives with a crew transfer system overhaul

    Egosoft are continuing to improve and expand their detailed space trading, exploration and combat sim X4: Foundations. Along with a bunch of gameplay improvements, one of the highlights of this release is the overhaul of the crew transfer feature. Instead of needing to make an order and having the ships meet up, it's been streamlined to be less of an annoyance. Now you can do it anywhere, along with it being possible to move any amount of people as they will use crew capsules to move around independently. Once you start getting far into the game and build up a little empire, this sounds like it will be much nicer.