Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.2
    So I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because
    of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last
    week, and with spotty internet for a few days before that [*].
    
    But there really doesn't seem to be any reason for another rc, since
    it's been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but
    they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming
    merge window. Part of it may be due to the July 4th week, of course,
    but whatever - I'll take the quiet week as a good sign.
    
    So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for
    another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release
    timing.
    
    There's no particular area that stands out there - the changes are so
    small that the sppended shortlog really is the best description of
    last week. A few small random changes all over: drivers,
    architectures, filesystem, mm, ...
    
    So with this, the merge window for 5.2 is open.
    
               Linus
  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds has announced today the release and general availability of the Linux 5.2 kernel series, a major release that adds several new features, updated drivers, and many improvements.

    After seven RCs (Release Candidates), the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now available and it comes with some very interesting features and enhancements. However, before we dive into what's new, you should know that this release is not a long-term supported (LTS) branch, which means that you stick with your current LTS kernel instead.

    "I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last week," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement. "So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing."

  • Linux 5.2 Kernel Released As The "Bobtail Squid"

    Adding to the excitement of 7 July is the release of the Linux 5.2 stable kernel, which also means the opening of the Linux 5.3 merge window.

    Linux 5.2.0 made it out today on time without having any extra release candidates for this summer 2019 kernel release. This kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window and its series of release candidates that then should debut as stable in September.

    See our Linux 5.2 feature overview for those wondering about all of the exciting features of this new kernel.

By Corbet of LWN

  • The 5.2 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.2 kernel. He originally planned for an rc8 this week, rather than 5.2, due to his travel schedule, but was pleasantly surprised at how calm things have been.

The Best Features Of Linux 5.2

Update Linux Kernel In Ubuntu

Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released

  • Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released For Linux Enthusiasts

    Kernel 5.2 also continues to add more speculative execution bug fixes for Intel CPUs. There are new GPU drivers as well for ARM Mali devices.

    Apart from these changes, kernel 5.2 comes with the usual bug fixes for different drivers, better hardware support for new and older hardware, and better display performance.

Linux "Kernel 5.2 Is Out"

Sparky update

  • [Sparky] Linux kernel 5.2

    The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.2 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

    Arriving pretty much bang on schedule, the Linux kernel 5.2 release was announced to the world with little of Linus Torvalds’ usual fanfare.

    Instead, the Linux founder opted for a quiet introduction when announcing the update on the Linux Kernel Mailing List.

    He writes: “…despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing”.

    Each and every update to the Linux kernel, be it big or small, brings a stack of welcome improvements, drivers, hardware support, graphics compatibility and more. Linux Kernel 5.2, dubbed the “Bobtail Squid” (blame Linus’ scuba diving hobby the moniker), is no exception.

Simon Sharwood writes for CRN

  • Double delight for Linux lovers as kernel 5.2 and Debian 10 debut

    The weekend has given Linux users two big new releases to contemplate!

    Those who like new cuts of the kernel have version 5.2 to consider. Linus Torvalds signed it off on Monday, Australian time.

    The biggest feature in 5.2 is probably support for Intel’s forthcoming Comet Lake architecture, which will power the tenth generation of its Core desktop and mobile CPUs due. The new silicon is due to ship late in 2019 and appear in products early the next year. Linux 5.2 also includes many tweaks that improve its performance on laptops.

    The kernel also now supports a handful of extra ARM-powered single-board computers.

    The other big new release is Debian 10 “Buster”, which officially debuted on Sunday 7 July, Australian time. But this cut of Debian had actually already been available since 25 June as part of the new version of Raspbian OS, the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s preferred OS for its single board computers.

    The Foundation described Buster as offering “no huge differences” compared to its predecessor. “In a sad reflection of the way the world is nowadays, most of the differences are security changes designed to make Buster harder to hack,” wrote Simon Long, a senior principal software engineer at the Pi Foundation.

By: Zohaib Ahsan

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 released, here is what’s new

    Despite the busy schedule of Linus Torvalds, we’re still getting a significant release in Linux Kernel 5.2 instead of just a release candidate.

    In the original news source, the king of the Linux world, Linus Torvalds, has claimed that he was possibly going to drop another release candidate as he was having internet problems for a few days and then got busy with his travels. Luckily, Linus didn’t stick to his plan owing to the lack of pull requests since rc7 and the fact that there seemed to be no real need for another release candidate. Thus, the announcement was made for the release of Linux Kernel 5.2, codenamed Bobtail Squid.

    [...]

    The key highlights of this release are new drivers, extended hardware support, performance improvements, and security fixes. However, Linux Kernel 5.2 is a mainline version, which is usually not suitable for mass deployments. Accordingly, FOSSLinux suggests its readers wait for Linux Kernel 5.2.1 to drop before upgrading their kernels.

CNX Software on Linux 5.2 Release

Slashdot has the news 'only' one week late

  • What's New in Linux 5.2?

    Linux 5.2 has been released. This release includes Sound Open Firmware, a project that brings open source firmware to DSP audio devices; open firmware for many Intel products is also included. This release also improves the Pressure Stall Information resource monitoring to make it usable by Android; the mount API has been redesigned with new syscalls; the BFQ I/O scheduler has gained some performance improvements; a new CLONE_PIDFD flag lets clone(2) return pidfs usable by pidfd_send_signal(2); Ext4 has gained support for case-insensitive name lookups; there is also a new device mapper target that simulates a device that has failing sectors and/or read failures; open source drivers for the ARM Mali t4xx and newer 6xx/7xx have been added. Many other new drivers, features and changes can be found in the changelog.

A couple more later articles

  • Linux 5.2 rolls out with Sound Open Firmware and Comet Lake support

    Kernel Kitten here, defender of the Linux kernel, commander of the Kitten Army, sworn to protect Commander Torvalds' intellectual property, and look dead cute while we do it.

    We cats aren't designed for summer. All we want to do is try and hide from the sun as much as possible. It starts with leaving the back door open to give us options, but will they? Oh no. Typical.

    Anyway, I've stepped away from the battalion in order to give you details of the latest updates, so hopefully, in line with my new calm, empathetic, zen persona, I'll be able to keep my temper and get on with telling you what you need to know for once.

  • Linux 5.2 releases with inclusion of Sound Open Firmware project, new mount API, improved pressure stall information and more

    Two days ago, Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux 5.2 in his usual humorous way, describing it as a ‘Bobtail Squid’. The release has new additions like the inclusion of the Sound Open Firmware (SOF) project, improved pressure stall information, new mount API, significant performance improvements in the BFQ I/O scheduler, new GPU drivers, optional support for case-insensitive names in ext4 and more. The earlier version, Linux 5.1 was released exactly two months ago.

    Torvalds says, “there really doesn’t seem to be any reason for another rc, since it’s been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming merge window. So despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing.”

    Linux 5.2 also kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window.

Late coverage today by Marius Nestor of kernel release

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Series Is Now Ready for Mass Deployments, Upgrade Now

    Released earlier this month, the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now ready for mass deployments as the first point releases are out, marking the branch as stable on the kernel.org website.
    Linux kernel 5.2 is a major release adding several exciting new features and improvements, including an open-source firmware to support DSP audio devices, new open-source GPU drivers for ARM Mali devices, a new file system mount API, support for case-insensitive names in the EXT4 file system, as well as better resource monitoring for Android.

    It also brings performance improvements to the BFQ I/O scheduler, a new device mapper "dust" target designed to simulate devices with failing sectors and read failures, a freezer controller for cgroups v2 for freeing up resources, and a CLONE_PIDFD flag to clone(2) for fetching PIDs when creating processes usable by pidfd_send_signal(2).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Debian: RcppSimdJson, Opinionated IkiWiki and More

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSimdJson 0.0.4: Even Faster Upstream!

    A new (upstream) simdjson release was announced by Daniel Lemire earlier this week, and my Twitter mentions have been running red-hot ever since as he was kind enough to tag me. Do look at that blog post, there is some impressive work in there. We wrapped up the (still very simple) rcppsimdjson around it last night and shipped it this morning. RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire. Via some very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. For illustration, I highly recommend the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk). The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Opinionated IkiWiki

    For various personal projects and things, past and present (including my personal site) I use IkiWiki, which (by modern standards) is a bit of a pain to set up and maintain. For that reason I find it hard to recommend to people. It would be nice to fire up a snapshot of an existing IkiWiki instance to test what the outcome of some changes might be. That's cumbersome enough at the moment that I haven't bothered to do it more than once. Separately, some months ago I did a routine upgrade of Debian for the web server running this site, and my IkiWiki installation broke for the first time in ten years. I've never had issues like this before.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in March 2020

    This month I accepted 156 packages and rejected 26. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 203.

Python Programming

  • Python 2.7.8 : Using python scripts with Revit Dynamo.

    Dynamo is a visual programming tool that extends the power of the Revit by providing access to Revit API (Application Programming Interface. Dynamo works with node, each node have inputs and outputs and performs a specific task. This is a short tutorial about how you can use your python skills with Revit and Dynamo software.

  • Getting started with Django middleware

    Django comes with a lot of useful features. One of them is middleware. In this post I'll give a short explanation how middleware works and how to start writing your own.

  • Talk Python to Me: #258 Thriving in a remote developer environment

    If you are listening to this episode when it came out, April 4th, 2020, there's a good chance you are listening at home, or on a walk. But it's probably not while commuting to an office as much of the world is practicing social distancing and working from home. Maybe this is a new experience, brought upon quickly by the global lockdowns, or maybe it's something you've been doing for awhile. Either way, being effective while working remotely, away from the office, is an increasingly valuable skill that most of us in the tech industry have to quickly embrace. On this episode, I'll exchange stories about working from home with Jayson Phillips. He's been writing code and managing a team from his home office for years and has brought a ton of great tips to share with us all.

  • How TO GET STARTED WITH Machine Learning
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxii) stackoverflow python report

today's howtos

Games: Anodyne, Streets of Rogue, Vendetta Online and More

  • Analgesic Productions have opened up the source for their Zelda-lite 'Anodyne'

    Anodyne, a Zelda-lite action adventure from Analgesic Productions from back in 2013 has today had the code opened up. Looking over the project, it's not open source as they have their own custom licensing with a number of restrictions on it. So by the definition of open source, it is not, it's more like "source open" but it's still a very nice gesture. It's similar in spirit to what Terry Cavanagh did with VVVVVV, in fact the licensing is actually an adaption of theirs. Hopefully with this move, someone can port it over to something more modern rather than Flash/Air—that certainly would be nice to see. Especially if the developer then pulled that back in to update it for everyone.

  • Looks like there's going to be a 'Streets of Rogue 2' and I'm definitely happy with that

    Streets of Rogue released in 2019 and it's one of my absolute favourites from last year (still is this year to be honest with you, it's just that good). The developer, Matt Dabrowski, recently outlined their future plans which will include a sequel. The 2019 release was after over six years of development, and at least half of that it was available in some form to the public. First as a free taster and later a full game. In an announcement on Steam about the latest update, Dabrowski mentioned how they would like to "take Streets of Rogue in some big new directions" and so they've "decided to begin work on a sequel".

  • Vendetta Online goes free to play until June 1 giving anyone full access

    Vendetta Online, something of a classic MMO space game is now free to play for everyone until June 1. Everyone will be treated as if they're a paying player during this time. Why are they doing this for so long? They said they wanted to offer a bit of sanctuary to players, somewhere "they can virtually go and be (politely) social, interact with others, and perhaps get a little respite from the chaos". They are of course referring to the Coronavirus situation. Read more on that here.

  • “Crunch”: Video Game Development’s Dirty Secret

    James Wood reported for Game Revolution that game director Masahiro Sakurai, who created Super Smash Bros Ultimate,  went “to work with an IV drip instead of taking a day off.” As Wood noted, Sakurai’s admission “have raised eyebrows, even in an industry where he is known as “notoriously hard-working.”