Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.2
    So I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because
    of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last
    week, and with spotty internet for a few days before that [*].
    
    But there really doesn't seem to be any reason for another rc, since
    it's been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but
    they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming
    merge window. Part of it may be due to the July 4th week, of course,
    but whatever - I'll take the quiet week as a good sign.
    
    So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for
    another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release
    timing.
    
    There's no particular area that stands out there - the changes are so
    small that the sppended shortlog really is the best description of
    last week. A few small random changes all over: drivers,
    architectures, filesystem, mm, ...
    
    So with this, the merge window for 5.2 is open.
    
               Linus
  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds has announced today the release and general availability of the Linux 5.2 kernel series, a major release that adds several new features, updated drivers, and many improvements.

    After seven RCs (Release Candidates), the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now available and it comes with some very interesting features and enhancements. However, before we dive into what's new, you should know that this release is not a long-term supported (LTS) branch, which means that you stick with your current LTS kernel instead.

    "I was somewhat pre-disposed towards making an rc8, simply because of my travels and being entirely off the internet for a few days last week," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement. "So despite a fairly late core revert, I don't see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing."

  • Linux 5.2 Kernel Released As The "Bobtail Squid"

    Adding to the excitement of 7 July is the release of the Linux 5.2 stable kernel, which also means the opening of the Linux 5.3 merge window.

    Linux 5.2.0 made it out today on time without having any extra release candidates for this summer 2019 kernel release. This kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window and its series of release candidates that then should debut as stable in September.

    See our Linux 5.2 feature overview for those wondering about all of the exciting features of this new kernel.

By Corbet of LWN

  • The 5.2 kernel has been released

    Linus Torvalds has released the 5.2 kernel. He originally planned for an rc8 this week, rather than 5.2, due to his travel schedule, but was pleasantly surprised at how calm things have been.

The Best Features Of Linux 5.2

Update Linux Kernel In Ubuntu

Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released

  • Linux 5.2 And Debian 10 “buster” Released For Linux Enthusiasts

    Kernel 5.2 also continues to add more speculative execution bug fixes for Intel CPUs. There are new GPU drivers as well for ARM Mali devices.

    Apart from these changes, kernel 5.2 comes with the usual bug fixes for different drivers, better hardware support for new and older hardware, and better display performance.

Linux "Kernel 5.2 Is Out"

Sparky update

  • [Sparky] Linux kernel 5.2

    The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.2 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Released, This is What’s New

    Arriving pretty much bang on schedule, the Linux kernel 5.2 release was announced to the world with little of Linus Torvalds’ usual fanfare.

    Instead, the Linux founder opted for a quiet introduction when announcing the update on the Linux Kernel Mailing List.

    He writes: “…despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing”.

    Each and every update to the Linux kernel, be it big or small, brings a stack of welcome improvements, drivers, hardware support, graphics compatibility and more. Linux Kernel 5.2, dubbed the “Bobtail Squid” (blame Linus’ scuba diving hobby the moniker), is no exception.

Simon Sharwood writes for CRN

  • Double delight for Linux lovers as kernel 5.2 and Debian 10 debut

    The weekend has given Linux users two big new releases to contemplate!

    Those who like new cuts of the kernel have version 5.2 to consider. Linus Torvalds signed it off on Monday, Australian time.

    The biggest feature in 5.2 is probably support for Intel’s forthcoming Comet Lake architecture, which will power the tenth generation of its Core desktop and mobile CPUs due. The new silicon is due to ship late in 2019 and appear in products early the next year. Linux 5.2 also includes many tweaks that improve its performance on laptops.

    The kernel also now supports a handful of extra ARM-powered single-board computers.

    The other big new release is Debian 10 “Buster”, which officially debuted on Sunday 7 July, Australian time. But this cut of Debian had actually already been available since 25 June as part of the new version of Raspbian OS, the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s preferred OS for its single board computers.

    The Foundation described Buster as offering “no huge differences” compared to its predecessor. “In a sad reflection of the way the world is nowadays, most of the differences are security changes designed to make Buster harder to hack,” wrote Simon Long, a senior principal software engineer at the Pi Foundation.

By: Zohaib Ahsan

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 released, here is what’s new

    Despite the busy schedule of Linus Torvalds, we’re still getting a significant release in Linux Kernel 5.2 instead of just a release candidate.

    In the original news source, the king of the Linux world, Linus Torvalds, has claimed that he was possibly going to drop another release candidate as he was having internet problems for a few days and then got busy with his travels. Luckily, Linus didn’t stick to his plan owing to the lack of pull requests since rc7 and the fact that there seemed to be no real need for another release candidate. Thus, the announcement was made for the release of Linux Kernel 5.2, codenamed Bobtail Squid.

    [...]

    The key highlights of this release are new drivers, extended hardware support, performance improvements, and security fixes. However, Linux Kernel 5.2 is a mainline version, which is usually not suitable for mass deployments. Accordingly, FOSSLinux suggests its readers wait for Linux Kernel 5.2.1 to drop before upgrading their kernels.

CNX Software on Linux 5.2 Release

Slashdot has the news 'only' one week late

  • What's New in Linux 5.2?

    Linux 5.2 has been released. This release includes Sound Open Firmware, a project that brings open source firmware to DSP audio devices; open firmware for many Intel products is also included. This release also improves the Pressure Stall Information resource monitoring to make it usable by Android; the mount API has been redesigned with new syscalls; the BFQ I/O scheduler has gained some performance improvements; a new CLONE_PIDFD flag lets clone(2) return pidfs usable by pidfd_send_signal(2); Ext4 has gained support for case-insensitive name lookups; there is also a new device mapper target that simulates a device that has failing sectors and/or read failures; open source drivers for the ARM Mali t4xx and newer 6xx/7xx have been added. Many other new drivers, features and changes can be found in the changelog.

A couple more later articles

  • Linux 5.2 rolls out with Sound Open Firmware and Comet Lake support

    Kernel Kitten here, defender of the Linux kernel, commander of the Kitten Army, sworn to protect Commander Torvalds' intellectual property, and look dead cute while we do it.

    We cats aren't designed for summer. All we want to do is try and hide from the sun as much as possible. It starts with leaving the back door open to give us options, but will they? Oh no. Typical.

    Anyway, I've stepped away from the battalion in order to give you details of the latest updates, so hopefully, in line with my new calm, empathetic, zen persona, I'll be able to keep my temper and get on with telling you what you need to know for once.

  • Linux 5.2 releases with inclusion of Sound Open Firmware project, new mount API, improved pressure stall information and more

    Two days ago, Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux 5.2 in his usual humorous way, describing it as a ‘Bobtail Squid’. The release has new additions like the inclusion of the Sound Open Firmware (SOF) project, improved pressure stall information, new mount API, significant performance improvements in the BFQ I/O scheduler, new GPU drivers, optional support for case-insensitive names in ext4 and more. The earlier version, Linux 5.1 was released exactly two months ago.

    Torvalds says, “there really doesn’t seem to be any reason for another rc, since it’s been very quiet. Yes, I had a few pull requests since rc7, but they were all small, and I had many more that are for the upcoming merge window. So despite a fairly late core revert, I don’t see any real reason for another week of rc, and so we have a v5.2 with the normal release timing.”

    Linux 5.2 also kicks off the Linux 5.3 merge window.

Late coverage today by Marius Nestor of kernel release

  • Linux Kernel 5.2 Series Is Now Ready for Mass Deployments, Upgrade Now

    Released earlier this month, the Linux 5.2 kernel series is now ready for mass deployments as the first point releases are out, marking the branch as stable on the kernel.org website.
    Linux kernel 5.2 is a major release adding several exciting new features and improvements, including an open-source firmware to support DSP audio devices, new open-source GPU drivers for ARM Mali devices, a new file system mount API, support for case-insensitive names in the EXT4 file system, as well as better resource monitoring for Android.

    It also brings performance improvements to the BFQ I/O scheduler, a new device mapper "dust" target designed to simulate devices with failing sectors and read failures, a freezer controller for cgroups v2 for freeing up resources, and a CLONE_PIDFD flag to clone(2) for fetching PIDs when creating processes usable by pidfd_send_signal(2).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Security: Patches, Firefox and Webmin

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (oniguruma and thunderbird-enigmail), openSUSE (chromium, ghostscript, and slurm), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (kpatch-patch), Slackware (bind), SUSE (python-ecdsa), and Ubuntu (bind9 and mariadb).

  • Princesses make terrible passwords

    When the Disney+ streaming service rolled out, millions of people flocked to set up accounts. And within a week, thousands of poor unfortunate souls reported that their Disney passwords were hacked. According to media reports, some Disney+ account holders have lost their account access while hackers have sold their logins online. [...] When setting up accounts, Lockwise can help you select something complex and unique that you never would have thought of on your own. Then you can save that tricky password straight into your browser and use it directly from the app, secured behind a master password or fingerprint login protected in the most delightful way for when you need it. We can’t guarantee that various services and platforms you use won’t ever be compromised, but we can help you create complex unique passwords to minimize your exposure should it occur. And with Firefox Monitor, we can alert you when breaches happen.

  • Two ways Firefox protects your holiday shopping

    We’re entering another holiday shopping season, and while you’re browsing around on the internet looking for thoughtful presents for friends and loved ones, it’s also a good time to give yourself the gift of privacy. Your research and shopping behavior has the potential to be a huge gift to the advertisers collecting data about your habits. If you’re not using Firefox, every weird search for every weird gift could get packaged up in a marketplace where companies and advertisers will be buying, selling and trading this data about you in their own holiday shopping bonanza. Using Firefox is the preventative measure you need during the holiday season (but really anytime you’re shopping online) to protect you from two potential problems...

  • Linux Webmin Servers Under Attack by Roboto P2P Botnet

    A newly-discovered peer-to-peer (P2P) botnet has been found targeting a remote code execution vulnerability in Linux Webmin servers. Vulnerable Linux Webmin servers are under active attack by a newly-discovered peer-to-peer (P2P) botnet, dubbed Roboto by researchers.

KDE/GNOME Events: Linux Applications Summit and KDE e.V. board meeting in Berlin

  • Some GNOME / LAS / Wikimedia love

    About LAS 2019: Linux App Summit Linux App Summit 2019 And about the previous LAS format: Libre Application Summit Libre Application Summit 2018

  • Linux Applications Summit 2019 activity

    And finally, I helped the local team with some minor tasks like moving items and so. I want to congratulate all the organization team and specially the local team for the results and the love they have put in the event. The results have been excellent and this is another strong step for the interweaved relations between opensource development communities sharing very near goals. My participation at the conference has been sponsored by the GNOME Foundation. Thanks very much for their support.

  • KDE e.V. board meeting in Berlin

    Just back from Barcelona – with a brief pause at home for some mathematical cabaret, a board meeting for my local badminton club, music lessons and an afternoon of volunteering at a local charity second-hand shop – and I’m off to Berlin again. The train is not particularly fast, but it’s a relatively predictable six hours from here to HBf and I do have some “home” feeling in Berlin. At least I have a favorite chocolate place. In Berlin we’re combining a KDE e.V. board meeting with the KDE Frameworks 6 sprint. Both events are basically “planning for the future” on an organizational and technical level.

Yocto-based Torizon distro adds OTA updater

Toradex has released an experimental version of an OTA updater for its new Torizon embedded Linux distribution. Torizon OTA offers fault-tolerant features and supports web-based remote management including grouping of devices into fleets. Read more

Growth of Kubernetes

  • Just how popular is Kubernetes?

    In its study of usage data from thousands of companies and more than 1.5 billion containers, the company found "roughly 45% of Datadog customers running containers use Kubernetes, whether in self-managed clusters or through a cloud service." Not bad for a technology that's just over five years old. What's more telling though is that almost half of all Datadog container users have already turned to Kubernetes. It's Kubernetes' growth rate that really tells the story. In the last year, Kubernetes' numbers of users grew by 10%. In the meantime, other container orchestration programs, such as Marathon and Docker swarm mode, have simply not caught fire. Indeed, their parent companies, D2iQ, formerly Mesosphere, and Docker both started offering Kubernetes to their customers. Need more be said? Datadog also found that Kubernetes is very popular on the public cloud. In particular, managed Kubernetes services such as Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) dominates the Google Cloud Platform (GCP). Since Kubernetes ancestry goes back to Google that comes as no surprise.

  • Rancher CEO on k3s: Kubernetes is the new Linux; you run it everywhere

    Once, Kubernetes was just some geeky cloud-native project for orchestrating containers (a virtualized method for running distributed applications). Isn’t it funny how it’s worked its way into practically every tech conversation in just a few years? In fact, thanks to technologies that shrink and simplify it, Kubernetes is about to find its way into even more use cases. With the technology and its uses expanding so rapidly, how do we even define it anymore? Sheng Liang (pictured), co-founder and chief executive officer of Rancher Labs Inc., has an idea: “Kubernetes is the new Linux, and you run it everywhere.” Cloud, on-premises data center, bare metal, internet of things edge, Raspberry Pi, surveillance camera? Check. The developer ecosystem is invading more and more spaces through tweaks that make Kubernetes easier than ever to deploy.