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OpenSUSE/SUSE: Leap 15.1 Update Experience, Btrfs in YaST, SUSECON and SUSE GSI Partner Forum

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SUSE
  • The openSUSE Leap 15.1 update experience

    My desktop is a HP Pavilion Power 580-146nd. This is a midsize PC with an AMD Ryzen 5 1400 CPU, an AMD Radeon RX 580 GPU, 16 GB of RAM, a 128 GB M.2 SSD and a 1 TB 7200rpm HDD.

    I used the same USB thumbstick. After selecting ‘Update’ from the boot menu, the whole screen went black. And then nothing happened. Since I have installed openSUSE many times before, I quickly realized that this must be a graphics issue. I used ‘nomodeset’ in the past to get around that issue. This causes the installer to go back to the most basic graphics settings but it also means I could finish the update.

    It used to be a lot easier to edit the boot options. However, this is now hidden. This post on Stack Exchange (2) gives a great explanation how to enable nomodeset, both as a one-time option and as a permanent option.

    For the permanent enablement of nomodeset I know an easier way: in YaST look for the module ‘Boot Loader’ and in the Kernel Parameters tab, you can edit the boot command. This was the route that I took to make nomodeset a permanent boot setting.

  • Getting further with Btrfs in YaST

    Since the YaST team rewrote the software stack for managing the storage devices, we have been adding and presenting new capabilities in that area regularly. That includes, among other features, the unpaired ability to format and partition all kind of devices and the possibility of creating and managing Bcache devices. Time has come to present another largely awaited feature that is just landing in openSUSE Tumbleweed: support for multi-device Btrfs file systems.

    As our usual readers surely know, Btrfs is a modern file system for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features that go beyond the scope and capabilities of traditional file systems. Such capabilities include subvolumes (separate internal file system roots), writable and read-only snapshots, efficient incremental backup and our today’s special: support for distributing a single file system over multiple block devices.

  • openSUSE's YaST Now Supports Multi-Device Btrfs Setups

    For those wanting to install openSUSE Tumbleweed on a system where a single Btrfs file-system spans multiple block devices, that's now easily possible with the latest YaST. This includes the abilities for just a simple file-system spanning multiple devices to data duplication to the various RAID levels natively supported by Btrfs.

  • An application a year to an application a week on AWS

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Ryan Niksch from AWS discussed how shifting the focus from writing code to deploying applications to production has become more critical as business agility tops the list of customer requirements. He then introduces the benefits of Cloud Foundry in general, and SUSE Cloud Application Platform specifically, including the AWS service broker; its benefits are that it is a containerized distribution of Cloud Foundry that can very quickly and easily be deployed to AWS using a Quick Start template.

  • THE Forum exclusively for GSI Partners!

    This year’s SUSE GSI Partner Forum will feature all these – you won’t want to miss it!

More in Tux Machines

Allan Day: GNOME Shell user research goings on

It’s been a while since we last blogged about the GNOME Shell design work that’s been happening. While we might not have blogged in a bit, there’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, particularly on the research side, and it’s about time that we told everyone about what we’ve been up to. As a side note: a great team has developed around this initiative. The existing design team of Jakub, Tobias and myself has been joined by Maria Komarova from System76. Maria has a particularly strong research background and was immensely helpful in running interviews. The development side has also been fully engaged with the process, particularly through Georges and Florian. Read more

Android Leftovers

Apostrophe – distraction free Markdown editor

Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write. Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *. Apostrophe is a distraction free Markdown editor. It uses pandoc as backend for Markdown parsing and offers a very clean and sleek user interface. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: DevNation Tech Talks, LINUX Unplugged and mintCast

  • Kubernetes: The evolution of distributed systems

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Kubernetes and distributed systems from Bilgin Ibryam and Burr Sutter. Cloud-native applications of the future will consist of hybrid workloads: stateful applications, batch jobs, stateless microservices, and functions (plus maybe something else) wrapped as Linux containers and deployed via Kubernetes on any cloud. Functions and the so-called serverless computing model are the latest evolution of what started as service-oriented architecture years ago. But is this the last step of the application architecture evolution and is it here to stay? During this talk, we will take you on a journey exploring distributed application needs, and how they evolved with Kubernetes, Istio, Knative, Dapr, and other projects. By the end of the session, you will know what is coming after microservices.

  • Distro Triforce | LINUX Unplugged 372

    What would it really take to get you to switch Linux distributions? We debate the practical reasons more and more people are sticking with the big three. Plus Carl from System76 stops by to surprise us with some firmware news.

  • mintCast 344 – Getting Jacked

    First up, in our Wanderings, I fiddle with the Focusrite, Tony Hughes paints it pink, Joe puts a ring on it, Bo gets jacked, Tony Watts reduces, reuses and recycles