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Open-source software catalog upsets those snubbed

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OSS

Open-source systems integrator Optaros Inc. Wednesday released a guide listing and reviewing what it considers the 262 best open-source applications for companies.

The catalog, available on Optaros' Web site, rates software on a scale of 1 to 5 on factors such as functionality, the vibrancy of the developer community behind it, the software's maturity and stability, and its projected trajectory. Those factors are then used to calculate the software's readiness for use by midsize and large corporations.

The minireviews were based on the experiences of nearly 100 consultants, many of whom had directly installed or maintained the software for clients. The reviews all involve products released by last fall and include only the best of the nearly 140,000 open-source software projects available, according to the catalog's primary author, Bruno von Rotz.

"Every tool that made its way into our catalog is already pretty good, even if we gave it only a 1 or 2 (out of 3) for its enterprise readiness," he said.

Some of the rankings for well-known open-source software were surprising.

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Also:

This is definitely a good idea, but would be better suited to a Wiki style of editing. It would be good to talk to the projects/companies to make sure that the information is correct. Mule for instance is MPL, not BSD, not a big deal, but if the goal is to have the defacto catalog it needs to be real-time up-to-date.

Open Source Catalog--interesting but difficult to maintain.

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