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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Android 8 forces FOSS apps to use Firebase for push notifications or label them as “using too much battery”

    Recently, Google imposed background limitations on the Android 8.0 (API level 26) for what apps can do while running in the background. Per this new update, Android 8 forces developers to use Firebase for their push notifications, or otherwise tell the user that the app has misbehaved. Push notifications are needed by all messaging apps such as Telegram-FOSS, riot.im, and other FOSS apps The problem here is that the Firebase Android client library is not open source. FOSS apps now cannot keep push notification features in Android 8 while also remaining 100% open source and not being stigmatized as misbehaved..

    Google official reason for putting this limitation is to improve the user experience. They state that when many Android apps and services are run simultaneously, it places a load on the system. Further if additional apps or services, run in the background, it places an additional load on the system, which could result in a poor user experience. For example, when a user is playing a game in one window while browsing the web in another window, and using a third app to play music, this could result in abrupt shut down of one of the apps, due to immense load on the system.

  • Introducing Matrix 1.0 and the Matrix.org Foundation

    Now, before you get too excited, it’s critical to understand that Matrix 1.0 is all about providing a stable, self-consistent, self-contained and secure version of the standard which anyone should be able to use to independently implement production-grade Matrix clients, servers, bots and bridges etc. It does not mean that all planned or possible features in Matrix are now specified and implemented, but that the most important core of the protocol is a well-defined stable platform for everyone to build on. On the Synapse side, our focus has been exclusively on ensuring that Synapse correctly implements Matrix 1.0, to provide a stable and secure basis for participating in Matrix without risk of room corruption or other nastinesses.

  • g2k19 Hackathon Report: Stefan Sperling on Access Points and Ghosts
  • 37th VistA Community Meeting

    Speaker, Topic / Link To Presentation [...]

  • Smarten Up Your Air Conditioning with the ESP8266

    If you’re looking for “smart” home appliances, there’s no shortage of options on the market. Even relatively low-end gadgets are jumping on the Internet of Things bandwagon these days (for better or for worse). But what if you’re not looking to purchase a brand new major appliance right now? In that case, you might be interested in seeing how [Giulio Pons] added some high-tech features to his existing air conditioner on the cheap.

    Since his AC unit had an infrared remote control, the first thing [Giulio] needed to do was come up with a way to emulate it. An easy enough project using the ESP8266 and an IR LED, especially when he found that somebody had already written a IR communications library for his particular brand of AC. From there, he could start tacking on sensors and functionality.

  • HestiaPi: A Stylish Open Hardware Thermostat

    Of course, the hardware is only half the equation. To get the HestiaPi Touch talking to all the other smart gadgets in your life, it leverages the wildly popular OpenHAB platform. As demonstrated in the video after the break, this allows you to use the HestiaPi and its mobile companion application to not only control your home’s heating and air conditioning systems, but pretty much anything else you can think of.

  • Simple Arduino Universal Remote Control

    The infrared remote control might not hold the seat of honor in the average home theater setup that it once enjoyed, but it’s not quite out to pasture yet. After all, what are you going to use to stop Netflix once the Chromecast invariably disconnects from your phone? As long as there are devices out there that will respond to commands blasted their way via an IR LED, hackers will be looking to get in on the action.

More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Systemd, DXVK, Intel and AMD

  • Systemd Is Now Seeing Continuous Fuzzing By Fuzzit
    In hoping to catch more bugs quickly, systemd now has continuous fuzzing integration via the new "Fuzzit" platform that provides continuous fuzzing as a service.  New this week to systemd is the continuous fuzzing integration where every pull request / push will see some quick checks carried out while on a daily basis will be fuzzed in full for all targets.
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  • DXVK 1.2.2 Brings Minor CPU Overhead Optimizations, Game Fixes
    In time for those planning to spend some time this weekend gaming, DXVK lead developer Philip Rebohle announced the release of DXVK 1.2.2 that will hopefully soon be integrated as part of a Proton update for Steam Play but right now can be built from source. While certain upstream Wine developers express DXVK being a "dead end" and are optimistic in favor of piping their WineD3D implementation over Vulkan, for Linux gamers today wanting to enjoy D3D11 Windows games on Linux the DXVK library continues working out splendid with great performance and running many Direct3D games with much better performance over the current WineD3D OpenGL code.
  • Intel 19.23.13131 OpenCL NEO Stack Adds Comet Lake Support
    We've seen the Intel Comet Lake support get pieced together in recent months in the different components making up the Intel Linux graphics stack while the compute-runtime is the latest addition. Comet Lake as a refresher is a planned successor to Coffeelake/Whiskeylake and expected to come out this year as yet more 9th Gen hardware. But Comet Lake should be interesting with rumored 10-core designs. Though with being more processors with Gen9 graphics, the Comet Lake Linux support basically boils down to adding in the new PCI IDs.
  • AMD Wires Its New Runtime Linker Into RadeonSI Gallium3D
    RadeonSI Gallium3D has already shifted over to using this new linker. Making use of the .rodata should help with efficiencies throughout the driver (more details in this forum thread) but at this point is mostly laying the groundwork for more improvements to be made moving forward.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Building IT Transformation Architecture with Red Hat OpenShift
    In the era of mobile applications, business challenges to the enterprise IT organizations are more dynamic than ever. Many enterprises have difficulties responding in time because of the inherent complexity and risk of integrating emerging technologies into existing IT architectures. In this article, I will share my experience on how to utilize Red Hat OpenShift as a “Middle Platform” (中台) for enterprises to construct its bimodal IT architecture with agile, scalable and open strategy. In the past year, I have discussed with many corporate customers–especially in the financial services industry–the challenges of digital transformation, and the solutions. Most of their difficulties are coming from “core systems” which have been working for more than 10 years.
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-24
    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is open through 23:59 UTC on Thursday 20 June. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.
  • Copr's Dist-Git
    In Copr, we use dist-git to store sources as well. However, our use case is different. In the past, Copr only allowed to build from URL. You provided a URL to your SRC.RPM and Copr downloaded it and built it. This was a problem when the user wanted to resubmit the build. The original URL very often did not exists anymore. Therefore we came with an idea to store the SRC.RPM somewhere. And obviously, the dist-git was the first idea.

Software: FreeFileSync, Debian/GSOC, LibreOffice and Lightworks

  • File Synchronization App FreeFileSync Brings Another Update
    File synchronization software, FreeFileSync releases latest update with 10.13. FreeFileSync is a folder and file synchronization free software that is available for Linux, Windows and Mac. This software can sync between your devices files and folders and only sync the changed files/directories. That means it can identify the changed files and make sure to transfer those in backup systems. Armed with scheduling of transfers, JOB features for sync – this free and open source software is one of the best file sync/ backup software available today. FreeFileSync released 10.13 with bunch of big fixes and enhancements.
  • Utkarsh Gupta: GSoC Bi-Weekly Report - Week 1 and 2
    The idea is to package all the dependencies of Loomio and get Loomio easily installable on the Debian machines. The phase 1, that is, the first 4 weeks, were planned to package the Ruby and the Node dependencies. When I started off, I hit an obstacle. Little did we know about how to go about packaging complex applications like that. I have been helping out in packages like gitlab, diaspora, et al. And towards the end of the last week, we learned that loomio needs to be done like diaspora.
  • Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Conference
    The LibreOffice Conference is the annual gathering of the community, our end-users, and everyone interested in free office software. Every year, it takes place in a different country and is supported by members of the LibreOffice commercial ecosystem. In 2018, the conference was organized by the young and dynamic Albanian community at Oficina in Tirana, from Wednesday, September 26, to Friday, September 28, the eight anniversary of the LibreOffice project. Here’s a quick video recap – read on for more details…
  • New Lightworks Beta Version 14.6 revision 114986 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!
    It is strongly recommended that users backup their project folder before installing any new Beta build of Lightworks. We are pleased to announce the second Beta of Lightworks 14.6 which includes many changes based on Forum feedback. Excellent work all round and we are hopeful that this Beta Cycle will be short lived. We hope you enjoy all the features and changes in the latest version which can be found in the : Changelog pages
  • Lightworks 14.6 Remains A Closed-Up Blob, But At Least The Linux Support Continues
    It was nearly a decade ago the high-end, commercial video software editing solution Lightworks announced they would be going open-source but to this day that milestone has yet to be materialized. Lightworks though does continue advancing with their v14.6 release on the horizon and at least their added Linux support continues to be expanded upon. EditShare, the company behind Lightworks, really dropped the ball when it came to their open-source plans. All that we've been able to gather over these years is that they hit some complexities with their original open-source plans and aren't committed enough in seeking to work through those issues to make the code public. So at the end of the day Lightworks is still a closed-source non-linear video editor, but at least it's one of the most feature-rich/professional-grade solutions with native Linux support.

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