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Programming: Bash, GraphQL and More

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Development
  • How to write a loop in Bash

    A common reason people want to learn the Unix shell is to unlock the power of batch processing. If you want to perform some set of actions on many files, one of the ways to do that is by constructing a command that iterates over those files. In programming terminology, this is called execution control, and one of the most common examples of it is the for loop.

  • Why use GraphQL?

    GraphQL, as I wrote previously, is a next-generation API technology that is transforming both how client applications communicate with backend systems and how backend systems are designed.

    As a result of the support that began with the organization that founded it, Facebook, and continues with the backing of other technology giants such as Github, Twitter, and AirBnB, GraphQL's place as a linchpin technology for application systems seems secure; both now and long into the future.  

  • Things I Learnt The Hard Way (in 30 Years of Software Development)

     

    This is a cynical, clinical collection of things I learnt in 30 years working with software development.

     

    Again, some things are really cynical, others are long observations on different jobs.

  • History of Programming languages

    Behind everything, we do on the computer and on their cell phones stands the code. The code is a specific dictionary of terms and instructions that ultimately leads to what we see users on their computers, such as a website, to a mobile game. There is a multitude of programming languages, but each one is unique. Each of them has a unique set of keywords and specific syntax.

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Wine 4.0.2 Released

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine maintenance release 4.0.2 is now available.

  • Wine 4.0.2 Released With 66 Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0.2 is out today as the second stable point release to this year's Wine 4.0 cycle. As is customary for Wine stable point releases, only bug fixes are allowed in while new features come by way of the bi-weekly development releases that will lead up to the Wine 5.0 release in early 2020.

  • The stable Wine 4.0.2 release is now available

    If you prefer to walk on the calmer side of life, the Wine 4.0.2 release has been made available today. As it's just a "maintenance" release, there's no big new features which are reserved for the current 4.xx series currently at 4.14 released on August 17th. With that in mind they noted 66 bugs being marked as solved. These bugs include issues with Worms 2, Warframe, Rogue Squadron 3D, Settlers III, Mass Effect, F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin, The Sims and plenty more.

  • Linux Gaming FINALLY Doesn't SUCK!

28 facts about Linux for its 28th birthday

Nearly three decades ago, Linus Torvalds sent the email announcing Linux, a free operating system that was "just a hobby" and not "big and professional like GNU." It's fair to say that Linux has had an enormous influence on technology and the world in general in the 28 years since Torvalds announced it. Most people already know the "origin story" of Linux, though. Here's 28 things about Linux (the kernel and larger ecosystem) you may not already know. 1 - Linux isn't very useful alone, so folks took to creating Linux distributions to bundle user software with it, make it usable and easier to install. The first Linux distribution was Softlanding Linux System (SLS), first released in 1992 and using the .96p4 Linux kernel. You could buy it on 5.25" or 3.5" floppies, or CD-ROM if you were high-tech. If you wanted a GUI, you needed at least 8MB of RAM. 2 - SLS didn't last, but it influenced Slackware Linux, which was first released in 1993 and is still under development today. Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and celebrated its 26th birthday on July 17th this year. 3 - Linux has the largest install base of any general purpose operating system. It powers everything from all 500 of the Top 500 Supercomputers to Android phones, Chomebooks, and all manner of embedded devices and things like the Kindle eBook readers and smart televisions. (Also the laptop used to write this post.) Read more

Quick Guide to The Awesome GNOME Disk Utility

GNOME Disk Utility is an awesome tool to maintain hard disk drives that shipped with Ubuntu. It's called simply "Disks" on start menu on 19.04, anyway. It's able to format hard disks and USB sticks, create and remove partitions, rename partitions, and check disk health. Not only that, it also features writing ISO into disk and vice versa, create ISO image of a disk. This tutorial explains in brief how to use it for 8 purposes. Let's go! Read more