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PyGamer open source handheld games console $39.95

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Gamers, coders and electronic enthusiasts looking to own a pocket sized open source handheld games console may be interested to know that the Adafruit PyGamer is now available priced at $39.95. Offering a small games console that can be coded using MakeCode Arcade, CircuitPython or Arduino. The PyGamer is powered by the ATSAMD51, with 512KB of flash and 192KB of RAM, Adafruit has also added 8 MB of QSPI flash for file storage, handy for images, fonts, sounds, or game assets.

“On the front you get a 1.8″ 160×128 color TFT display with dimmable backlight – we have fast DMA support for drawing so updates are incredibly fast. A dual-potentiometer analog stick gives you great control, with easy diagonal movement – or really any direction you like. There’s also 4 square-top buttons, which fit our square top button caps. The buttons are arranged to mimic a gaming handheld, with 2 menu-select buttons and 2 fire-action buttons. There’s also 5 NeoPixel LEDs to dazzle or track activity.”

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Also: Honeycomb CRUNCH releases, an example Godot game with sources

32blit/Picade

  • 32blit is an open-source retro-style handheld that wants to help you code your first game

    The brains behind the phenomenal Picade now have their sights set on retro handhelds, with 32blit (£90). But whereas Picade invited you to build an arcade cabinet, 32blit’s DIY nature is all about the games. So coo all you like at the device’s bright 3.5in display and decent selection of controls, backed by a 32-bit ARM processor; but it’s a pretty brick until you get to work. Fortunately, Pimoroni’s got you covered there, too, by way of monthly tutorials that – whether you’re a hacking newbie or coding god – lead you through programming your first game. Those with the artistic and musical bent of a tub of lard also get 2000 sprites and hundreds of sound effects to play with, whereas sickeningly talented types can get stuck into a gaggle of editors to craft their very own retro-infused masterpieces.

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