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today's leftovers

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  • OSMC's May update is here

    Last month, we released Kodi v18 for OSMC devices. Since then, we've been working on a number of improvements and bug fixes to keep things running smoothly.

  • Linux Mint 17.x Reached End Of Life (EOL)

    We came to know from the Linux Mint monthly (April-2019) newsletter, the Linux Mint team reported that Linux Mint 17.x has reached the end of its supported life.

    After 5 good years of service, Linux Mint 17.x (i.e. 17, 17.1, 17.2 and 17.3) reached “End Of Life”.

    Although the repositories will continue to work they will no longer receive security updates.

  • Intel's 'Islay Canyon' NUCs Announced

    Introducing the first Intel® NUC with 8th Generation Intel® Core™ processors and Radeon* 540X discrete graphics for all your gaming and entertainment needs. Play casual games, binge watch the latest series, or stream digital music like never before with a quad-core processor that delivers 2x faster performance.

  • Avoiding Big Tech to Protect Your Privacy

    In a recent opinion piece by Jennifer Senior, titled If We Care So Much About What Google Knows, Why Do We Keep Telling it Everything?, she properly describes the privacy paradox as what happens when a person consistently acts in ways that are contradictory to the privacy values professed by that same person.

    The reasons behind the privacy paradox have been highlighted numerous times by our team at Purism: it all boils down to a simple word, convenience. It is convenient to give up your digital rights, it is simple to just click past a privacy wall, and easy to sign up for a service you know exploits you. It is inconvenient to learn about the best practices for privacy protection, from software to browser plugins and applications – let alone to find what service to use that isn’t entirely designed to spy on everything you do.

    The solution to the privacy paradox has also been answered many times by our team at Purism. It all boils down to the same simple word, convenience. People want convenient products that respect them by default, that they can trust will not exploit them, that allow them to participate in digital society with peace of mind, knowing they are in complete control.

  • Google and Binomial Partner to Open Source Basis Universal Texture Codec

    Google and Binomial have announced a partnership to open source the Basis Universal texture codec to improve the performance of transmitting images on the web and within desktop and mobile applications, while maintaining GPU efficiency. This release fills an important gap in the graphics compression ecosystem and complements earlier work in Draco geometry compression.

  • Say Goodbye to the Physical Kilogram (and Perhaps much More)

    Once upon a time we lived in a society that was not only completely analog but infinitely simpler. A time when it seemed the physical world could be understood and described, perhaps even tamed, purely through the application of rational thought. Contemporaries dubbed that era the Age of Enlightenment and looked forward to the wonders that this brave new world would bring. This week, one of the last icons of that heady time was dethroned and retired to a museum in Paris.

    I am speaking, of course, about the kilogram, the last of the seven International System of Units measures to be represented by a physical object rather than an “invariant constant of nature.” But where did it come from? And why, after two hundred twenty years, has it been replaced?

    The story begins with the same school of humanists that provided the philosophic justification for the French revolution which began honorably before descending into a campaign of terror. When they decided to rationalize the multiple systems of weights and measures, the results were both more benign and long-lasting, perhaps because they took their inspiration from the grand canvas of the physical world around them. The metre became the fundamental unit of length and was fixed at one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. Weight, in turn, would henceforth be calculated in reference to the kilogram, defined as the mass of one decimetre of pure water at sea level at a set temperature and barometric pressure.

  • g2k19 hackathon report from Claudio Jeker

More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.1.15, 4.19.56, and 4.14.130

  • Linux 5.1.15
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.15 kernel. All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.56
  • Linux 4.14.130

Introducing people.kernel.org

Ever since the demise of Google+, many developers have expressed a desire to have a service that would provide a way to create and manage content in a format that would be more rich and easier to access than email messages sent to LKML. Today, we would like to introduce people.kernel.org, which is an ActivityPub-enabled federated platform powered by WriteFreely and hosted by very nice and accommodating folks at write.as. Read more

Statement by The Apache Software Foundation Board of Directors

It is with a mix of sadness and appreciation that the ASF Board accepted the resignations of Board Member Jim Jagielski, Chairman Phil Steitz, and Executive Vice President Ross Gardler last month. As an ASF co-founder, Jim has held every officer position since the Foundation’s incorporation, with the exception of a one-year break in 2018. He has played a substantial role in the development and success of the organization and is a recognized advocate of Open Source at the developer and corporate levels. An ASF Member since 2005, Phil was instrumental in the adoption, growth, and ubiquity of Apache Java projects across many industries, most visibly financial services. He served as Vice President Apache Commons for four years, and as ASF Chairman August 2017 - May 2019. Ross has been championing The Apache Way to governments, corporations, and educational institutions for nearly two decades. Since becoming an ASF Member in 2005, he served as Vice President of Community Development (2009-2012), ASF Director and President (2015-2016), and ASF Executive Vice President October 2016 - May 2019. We laud their contributions to many of the ASF's achievements over the past two decades [1]. Their motivation, vision, and passion is truly inspiring. Whilst we will greatly miss their day-to-day leadership at the executive level, we are heartened that the Foundation will continue to benefit through their participation as ASF Members. Read more

Android Leftovers