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Huawei's alternative OS to Android set to roll out as early as fall

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OS

Reports have circulated about Huawei's efforts to build an alternative OS to Android for at least 3 years at this point. It's not known if the software will be a fork off of AOSP, which the company is free to use in any case under Google's open-source license. Huawei may also elect to use another base and implement an Android runtime as the Unix-derived BlackBerry 10 OS did. In any case, we're all still playing the guessing game.

Yu's statements — which were made to a quasi-public WeChat group this morning — followed a media briefing with the company's founder, Ren Zhengfei, on how it will handle its mounting challenges. Both executives have attempted to calm animosity coming from fervent fans and nationalists alike who have been ditching Apple products in favor of the company's, saying that patriots don't necessarily use Huawei products.

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Huawei’s HongMeng (Kirin OS)

  • Huawei’s HongMeng (Kirin OS?) Is 9 Years Old & Optimized For Linux

    After Google rescinded Huawei’s Android license and reports of other companies ceasing their dealings with the company emerged, we’ve now got a photograph of a power point presentation. This image is from a university in Shanghai, and its source claims that it marks the beginning of Huawei’s custom operating system dubbed ‘HongMeng’.

Google has canceled Huawei’s Android license

  • Huawei’s Android Alternative OS: Everything You Need To Know

    You might already know this but because of the executive order, Google has canceled Huawei’s Android license. Now, they’re only limited to accessing the AOSP barebones version of Android which doesn’t include any Google stuff like Play Store, YouTube, Gmail, and so on.

    This is a very big move because it affects all the Huawei and Honor devices sold internationally. Although, its Chinese market won’t see any significant difference as Google is already banned there.

    Also, Huawei and Honor branded smartphones won’t be getting any future Android updates. So, in order to keep their devices alive, they’re bringing their new OS.

    It’s not just Huawei, the latest move would also hurt the search giant. It would lose on the Android licensing fee it collects per device. Also, lots of potential customers who would use Google apps and services on Huawei devices.

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